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Looking at Ptolemaic Private Portraiture
Author: Giorgia Cafici
In The Egyptian Elite as Roman Citizens Giorgia Cafici offers the analysis of private, male portrait sculptures as attested in Egypt between the end of the Ptolemaic and the beginning of the Roman Period.

Ptolemaic/Early Roman portraits are examined using a combination of detailed stylistic evaluation, philological analysis of the inscriptions and historical and prosopographical investigation of the individuals portrayed. The emergence of this type of sculpture has been contextualised, both geographically and chronologically, as it belongs to a wider Mediterranean horizon.

The analysis has revealed that eminent members of the Egyptian elite decided to be represented in an innovative way, echoing of portraits of eminent Romans of the Late Republic, whose identity was surely known in Egypt.
Author: Fredrik Hagen
In Ostraca from the Temple of Millions of Years of Thutmose III, Fredrik Hagen publishes a range of texts from recent excavations at Thebes. Although fragmentary, the corpus is one of the richest that have come to light for a generation, in terms of both the number of ostraca and the different types of texts represented, and provides essential new data for anyone interested in ancient Egyptian temples, religion, priests, and social history.

The texts shed light on many aspects of life in an Egyptian temple, including the building of the temple, the daily operations of its cult, the organisation and size of the priesthood, types and quantities of offerings, as well as the broader cultural issues of literacy and the transmission of literature.
This book is the first ever edition of an abnormal hieratic business archive from the Louvre once kept by a mortuary priest in 7th century BCE Thebes (Egypt). In addition to providing a full edition of the eight texts from this unique – and partly unpublished – archive, the author also discusses points of Late Period history, law, economics, religion, grammar, and chronology. Of equal note is the particular focus on abnormal hieratic palaeography, thereby turning this publication into a genuine handbook for the study of the most difficult script from Ancient Egypt that will serve students for the next hundred years, offering a unique insight into the ancient Egyptian abnormal hieratic and demotic legal traditions.
Author: Ido Koch
In Colonial Encounters in Southwest Canaan during the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age Koch offers a detailed analysis of local responses to colonial rule, and to its collapse. The book focuses on colonial encounters between local groups in southwest Canaan (between the modern-day metropolitan areas of Tel Aviv and Gaza) and agents of the Egyptian Empire during the Late Bronze Age (16th–12th centuries BCE). This new perspective presents the multifaceted aspects of Egyptian colonialism, the role of local agency, and the reshaping of local practices and ideas. Following that, the book examines local responses to the collapse of the empire, mechanisms of societal regeneration during the Iron Age I (12th–10th centuries BCE), the remnants of the Egyptian–Canaanite colonial order, and changes in local ideology and religion.
Middle Kingdom Palace Culture and Its Echoes in the Provinces addresses the significant gaps that remain in scholarly understanding about the origins and development of Egypt’s “Classical Age”. The essays in this volume are the end result of a conference held at the University of Jaén in Spain to study the history, archaeology, art, and language of the Middle Kingdom. Special attention is paid to provincial culture, perspectives, and historical realities. The distinguished group of Egyptologists from around the world gathered to consider the degree of influence that provincial developments played in reshaping the Egyptian state and its culture during the period. This volume aims to take a step towards a better understanding of the cultural renaissance, including the ideological transformations and social reorganization, that produced the Middle Kingdom.
The volume The Expression of Emotions in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia offers an overview of the study of emotions in ancient texts, discusses the concept of emotions in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and shows how emotions are described in the ancient texts. In the section dedicated to Ancient Egypt, scholars discuss emotions such as fear, depression, anger, feelings of pain, envy, jealousy and greed, with evidence from different text genres, as well as emotions from the Late Ramesside Letters and royal inscriptions. In the section dedicated to Ancient Mesopotamia, scholars present a wide range of perspectives on Sumerian and Akkadian literary and archival texts that treat emotions in different periods.
Editor: Vanessa Davies
The Phoebe A. Hearst Expedition to Naga ed-Deir, Cemeteries N 2000 and N 2500 presents the results of excavations directed by George A. Reisner and led by Arthur C. Mace. The site of Naga ed-Deir, Egypt, is unusual for its continued use over a long period of time (c. 3500 BCE–650 CE). Burials in N 2000 and N 2500 date to the First Intermediate Period/Middle Kingdom and the Coptic era. In keeping with Reisner’s earlier publications of Naga ed-Deir, this volume presents artifacts in chapter-length studies devoted to a particular object type and includes a burial-by-burial description. The excavators’ original drawings, notes, and photographs are complemented by a contemporary analysis of the objects by experts in their subfields.
Akhenaten and Family in the Amarna Tombs
Author: Arlette David
In Renewing Royal Imagery: Akhenaten and Family in the Amarna Tombs, Arlette David offers a systematic, in-depth analysis of the visual presentation of ancient Egyptian kingship during Akhenaten's reign (circa 1350 B.C.) in the elite tombs of his new capital, domain of his god Aten, and attempts to answer two basic questions: how can Amarna imagery look so blatantly Egyptian and yet be intrinsically different? And why did it need to be so?
Some people love their friends even when they are far away: Festschrift in Honour of Francisca A.J. Hoogendijk
This volume is a Festschrift in honour of Francisca Hoogendijk, containing contributions by forty friends, colleagues and former students. It includes fifty-six editions and re-editions of (Abnormal) Hieratic, Demotic, Greek, Latin and Coptic texts, most of them from Ancient Egypt. The texts are as diverse as the jubilee’s own range of interests and her extensive papyrological network, including both literary and documentary texts, written on papyri and potsherds, dating from the twelfth century BCE to the eighth century CE. All texts are published with transcriptions, translations, commentary and photographs.
Author: Rachel Finnegan
In Richard Pococke’s Letters from the East (1737-1740), Rachel Finnegan provides edited transcripts of the full run of correspondence from Richard Pococke’s famous eastern voyage from 1737-41. In this new volume, Finnegan combines updated biographical accounts of the traveller and his correspondents (his mother, Elizabeth Pococke and his uncle and patron, Bishop Thomas Milles) from vol. 1 of the original edition of Letters from Abroad (2011) with transcriptions of the letters from vol. 3 of the series (2013), together with new material that has hitherto been unpublished. Thus, in a single volume, she sets the context of the life and times of the traveller and his family against the background of this voluminous corpus of fascinating correspondence, which can be read in conjunction with Pococke’s own published account of his travels, A Description of the East and Some Other Countries (1743-45).