Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,431 items for :

  • Biblical Studies x
  • Religion & Society x
Clear All
This volume, the thirty-fifth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2018-19. Paper topics include: evidence for Simplicius as author of the Commentary on the De Anima; Aristotle and Humean theory of motivation, ‘besires’ and desires; moderation in NE 3,10-12 as novel in Aristotle, differing greatly from his contemporaries, especially Plato’s Charmides; Platonic memory and oblivion, mythic sources and cultural influence; Aristotle’s final causality in recovering nature from inanimate mechanism. The commentators take up the themes of these papers, in some instances developing and building on the main argument, while in others offering direct challenges to the principal author’s thesis.
Artful Works and Dialogue about 'Art as Experience'
Imagining Dewey features productive (re)interpretations of 21st century experience using the lens of John Dewey’s Art as Experience, through the doubled task of putting an array of international philosophers, educators, and artists-researchers in transactional dialogue and on equal footing in an academic text. This book is a pragmatic attempt to encourage application of aesthetic learning and living, ekphrasic interpretation, critical art and agonist pluralism.

There are two foci: (a) Deweyan philosophy and educational themes with (b) analysis and examples of how educators, artists, and researchers envision and enact artful meaning making. This structure meets the needs of university and high school audiences, who are accustomed to learning about challenging ideas through multimedia and aesthetic experience.

Contributors are: James M. Albrecht, Adam I. Attwood, John Baldacchino, Carolyn L. Berenato, M. Christina Di Gregori, Holly Fairbank, Jim Garrison, Amanda Gulla, Bethany Henning, Jessica Heybach, David L. Hildebrand, Ellyn Lyle, Livio Mattarollo, Christy McConnell Moroye, María-Isabel Moreno-Montoro, María Martínez Morales, Stephen M. Noonan, Louise G. Phillips, Scott L. Pratt, Joaquin Roldan, Leopoldo Rueda, Tadd Ruetenik, Leísa Sasso, Bruce Uhrmacher, David Vessey, Ricardo Marín Viadel, Sean Wiebe, Li Xu and Martha Patricia Espíritu Zavalza.
This exciting addition to scholarly practice showcases a range of invited national and international authors who bring together their expertise, knowledge and previous studies to this edition. It is the fourth book in the series "Global Education in the 21st Century" and focuses upon mentoring in education.
What is evident within each of the chapters and is a theme throughout this book is the constant search to articulate the mentoring relationship and to explore within each diverse context the effect of this relationship upon those involved. This thread of intentional discovery is both exciting and exhaustive. What is clear when the totality of chapters are now examined and the key lessons to be learnt are derived, is that the adoption of any one approach and theoretical framework for mentoring in educational contexts is likely to be fraught. That is, the authors have expertly explored both the challenges and advantages of their specific context and the powerful lessons within each context, clearly illustrating the relevance and interrelationship of the context to the mentoring approach.
This prevailing message presents significant challenges for educators, setting up a tension between the various aspects of mentoring such as nurturing, imitation, reflective practice and disruptive challenging. When overlaid with the possibility of a shifting transformational role between the mentor and the mentee, the challenges appear vast. But the passion and spirit of the search is also evident in each of the chapters presented here and the overall conclusion of the combined chapters making up the authority of the book is the ardour and voice of educational contexts and diversity, framed in the professional development and learning scaffolds supplied by each of the authors. It is this commitment that will sustain education and mentoring well into the future.

Contributors are: Veysel Akçakın, Anastasios (Tasos) Barkatsas, Tania Broadley, Andrea Chester, Anthony Clarke, Angela Clarke, Yüksel Dede, Kathy Jordan, Gürcan Kaya, Huk-Yuen Law, Kathy Littlewood, Darren Lingley, Tricia McLaughlin, Juanjo Mena, Peter Saunders, Naomi Wilks-Smith, Dallas Wingrove, and Sophia Xenos.
Undergraduates and Inmates Write Their Way Out
Critical stories are narratives that recount the writer’s experiences, situating those experiences in broader cultural contexts. In this volume of Critical Storytelling, marginalized, excluded, and oppressed peoples share insights from their liminality to help readers learn from their perspectives on living from behind invisible bars. Female inmates at Decatur’s Correctional Center and the undergraduate Millikin University students who worked with them come together to give voice to their specific histories of living from behind invisibile bars and pose important questions to the reader about inciting change for the future. Specifically, the voices in this volume seek to expose, analyze, and challenge deeply-entrenched narratives and characterizations of incarcerated women, whose histories are often marked by sexual abuse, domestic violence, poverty, PTSD, a lack of education, housing insecurity, mental illness, and substance addiction. These silenced female inmate voices need to be heard and contextualized within the larger metanarrative of prison literature. Through telling critical stories, these writers attempt to: sustain recovery from trauma, make positive changes and informed decisions, create a real sense of empowerment, strengthen their capacity to exercise personal agency, and inspire audiences to create change far outside the reaches of physical and metaphorical bars.

Contributors are: Anonymous, Soren Belle, Megan Batty, Dwight G. Brown, Jr., Sandra Brown, Kathryn Coffey, Kelly Cunningham, Paiten Hamilton, Kathlyn J. Housh, Rebekah Icenesse, Kala Keller, Jelisa Lovette, Bric Martin, Amanda Minetti, Laura Nearing, Angie Oaks, Claire Prendergast, Cara Quiett, J. M. Spence, Noah Villarreal and Alisha Walker.
Challenges and Opportunities in Internal and External Quality Assurance
Globalization, massification of tertiary education, and ICT revolution have radically altered the tertiary education environment posing new challenges to governments, higher education providers and other key stakeholders in terms of relevance and credibility of provisions. With the radical alterations it became clear that the traditional means for internal and external evaluations are no longer adequate to ensure the acceptable level of tertiary education performance to meet the society development needs. Considering one of the primary roles of quality assurance in tertiary education is ensuring relevance and credibility of tertiary education provisions to the ever-changing needs of the macro world of industry, politics and society at large, more and more governments are currently prioritizing quality assurance to drive the required changes in governance of higher educatuon systems, mutual recognition across national borders, and accountability to the public in different parts of the world.

As part of its mission the INQAAHE has undertaken a Global Study of both external and internal quality assurance developments worldwide in cooperation with the regional QA networks (e.g. ENQA, CANQATE, APQN, ANQAHE, CEENQA) in 2017–2018. The regions covered in this scoping study are as follows: Africa, the Arab Region, Asia-Pacific, Eastern and Western Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Northern America.

The Global Trends in Higher Education Quality Assurance: Challenges and Opportunities in Internal and External Quality Assurance provides a comprehensive coverage of the trends and developments in higher education quality assurance as they refer to legitimacy/trust, efficiency and relevance.