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Multidisciplinary Perspectives from the Ancient to the Early Modern World
Elements, Nature, Environment: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from the Ancient to the Early Modern World publishes high-quality scholarship that explores the relationship between the elements and the environment, covering the periods from antiquity to early modern. The series encourages cutting-edge research with a wide range of interdisciplinary approaches in the fields of including (but not limited to) history of science, philosophy, linguistics, literature, history, art history, and eco-criticism, ranging from Northern Europe and the Mediterranean world to Africa and the Middle East, India, Japan, China, and other regions. Contributions may cover the areas of history of the elements and elemental theory; environment, cosmology, and climate; well-being and the human body alongside food, nutrition, diets, herbs as well as its relevance for pharmacology and medicine; disasters and epidemics; animal lore, agriculture, and landscapes; maps and diagrams; weather, meteorology, and religion. These and other related themes could be explored either diachronically or by focusing on any specific time period between antiquity and early modern. The series promotes collaborative and comparative analysis of textual or visual sources from different traditions and historical periods, and maps points of intersection alongside differences in the way in which various civilisations understood their place within nature and the environment around them. Inter-, multi-, and cross-disciplinary approaches are particularly welcomed. The series operates with a variety of formats, from monographs and edited thematic collections to critical editions and translations into English.
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The Gothic and Twenty-First-Century American Popular Culture examines the gothic mode deployed in a variety of texts that touch upon inherently US American themes, demonstrating its versatility and ubiquity across genres and popular media. The volume is divided into four main thematic sections, spanning representations related to ethnic minorities, bodily monstrosity, environmental anxieties, and haunted technology. The chapters explore both overtly gothic texts and pop culture artifacts that, despite not being widely considered strictly so, rely on gothic strategies and narrative devices.
Damascus under the Mamlūk sultans (1260–1516 CE)
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The goals and tactics of a state's ruling elite influence its artistic and architectural output, shaping the overall characteristics, orientation, and themes of its creations. Architecture reflects political ideology and historical events, showcasing the power and cultural values of the state, with implications for politics and authority.
This book presents a comprehensive and nuanced exploration of the intricate interplay between art, politics, and religion within the architectural legacy of Mamluk Damascus. It sheds light on how these dynamics enrich our comprehension of the past and contribute to contemporary dialogues concerning the preservation of cultural heritage.