Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Brill | Nijhoff x
  • Religious Studies x
  • History of Linguistics & Philosophy of Language x
  • Brill | Rodopi x
Clear All

The Proto-Germanic n-stems

A study in diachronic morphophonology

Series:

Guus Kroonen

The n-stems are an intriguing part of Proto-Germanic morphology. Unlike any other noun class, the n-stems have roots that are characterized by systematic consonant and vowel alternations across the different Germanic dialects. This monograph represents a diachronic investigation of this root variation. It traces back the Germanic n-stems to their Indo-European origin, and clarifies their formal characteristics by an interaction of sound law and analogy. This book therefore is not just an attempt to account for the typology of the Germanic n-stems, but also a case study of the impact that sound change may have on the evolution of morphology and derivation.

Les modalités en français

La validation des représentations

Series:

Laurent Gosselin

Le langage permet de communiquer des représentations, mais toujours énoncées selon un mode de validation/invalidation particulier, comme nécessaires, possibles, probables, douteuses, souhaitables, regrettables, obligatoires, redoutées, etc. Ce sont là les modalités linguistiques (au sens large). Elles sont exprimées par des marqueurs grammaticaux, des constructions syntaxiques, par l’ensemble des lexèmes, qui sont porteurs de divers types d’évaluations ; ou elles sont inférées sur la base de connaissances encyclopédiques et/ou discursives.
Cet ouvrage présente une théorie générale des modalités, appliquée au français moderne, sous la forme d’un système de règles. Dans ce cadre, sont proposées des solutions nouvelles pour résoudre des problèmes classiques de philosophie du langage (sémantique de croire/savoir, opacité référentielle, etc.) et de grammaire française (valeur de la négation, de l’interrogation, emploi du subjonctif, etc.).
Quoique le point de vue soit proprement linguistique, les relations avec les domaines connexes (pragmatique, sémiotique, rhétorique, analyse des discours, philosophie du langage, logique …) sont systématiquement précisées, dans le but d’éclairer cette dimension essentielle du jugement que constitue la validation des représentations.

Series:

Robin D. Rollinger

One of the most important students of Franz Brentano was Anton Marty, who made it his task to develop a philosophy of language on the basis of Brentano’s analysis of mind. It is most unfortunate that Marty does not receive the attention he deserves, primarily due to his detailed and distracting polemics. In the analysis presented here his philosophy of language and other aspects of his thought, such as his ontology (which ultimately diverges from Brentano’s), are examined first and foremost in their positive rather than critical character. The analysis is moreover supplemented by translations of four important works by Marty, including his entire work On the Origin of Language. These are in fact the first English translations of any substantial writings by him. The resulting picture that emerges from the analysis and translations is that Marty has much to say that proves to be of enduring interest for the philosophy of language on a range of topics, especially the meanings of statements, of emotive expressions, and of names as regards both their communicative and their ontological aspects. The volume will be of interest not only to philosophers and historians of philosophy, but also to historians of linguistics and psychology.

Series:

Edited by Colin Barr Grant and Donal McLaughlin

This uniquely interdisciplinary collection of essays derives in part from a two-day international conference held at Heriot-Watt University in November 1999 and conceived as a critical forum for the discussion of the concept of interaction. The collection satisfies a continuing need for interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary research in the humanities and stems from an awareness of the growing currency of interactionist theories in several fields and the need to make a critical contribution to such theories and related concepts such as intersubjectivity and dialogism. Rather than advancing an apologetic view of interaction as something given, the contributors carefully consider and challenge commonly held epistemological and theoretical assumptions relating to the interaction concept. Interaction, if it is to be a meaningful concept, must be seen in terms of its modes (e.g. linguistic, media-based), units (language, logic, communication), objectives (understanding, consensus, stability) and fields of operation (face-to-face interaction, translation, social codification). This collection is intended to offer a provisional response to the question posed by one of its contributors, ‘What does it mean today that communication as the mechanism of social co-ordination has itself become complex?’. It means that erstwhile certainties of meaning transmission, stability, duality or dichotomy, identity and difference can be challenged and theoretically modelled in new contexts. Interdisciplinarity is one means by which to illuminate this complexity from several sides in the pursuit of theoretical blind spots in the field of critical communication studies. The book will be of particular interest to researchers and students in communication theory, linguistics, translation studies, logic, social psychology, discourse studies, European Studies, philosophy and semiotics.