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Tibeto-Mongolica Revisited

With a New Introduction and Selected Papers on Tibetan Linguistics

András Róna-Tas

Based on the Tibetan loanwords in an archaic Mongolic language, the author reconstructed an unknown Tibetan dialect which pertains to the North Eastern Archaic Tibetan group. The result is compared with the data known from other NEAT dialects, with the material of the West Archaic Tibetan languages such as Balti, Purig and Ladak, and also with the non-archaic dialects from Central Tibet and Lhasa. With the use of Literary Tibetan and data from Old Tibetan, Tibeto-Mongolica proposes a new approach to the reconstruction of the history of the Tibetan language. Originally published in 1966, and long out of print, the book has served as a standard handbook for historical Tibetan studies for several generations of scholars and is now updated by a new Introduction and enhanced by reprints of a selection of the author’s relevant Tibetological papers.

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Rumiko Shinzato and Leon A. Serafim

Rumiko Shinzato and Leon A. Serafim bring a new dimension to kakari musubi (a type of focus construction, henceforth KM) research, incorporating Japanese and Western linguistic theories, and synthesizing Okinawan and Japanese scholarship. Specifically, they analyze still-extant Okinawan KM in comparative perspective with its now extinct Japanese counterpart, while also offering reconstructed Proto-Japonic forms. Major hypotheses on the origins and demise of KM with insight from Okinawan are also evaluated.

In addition, viewing KM as consisting of kakari particle + nominalized musubi predicate, they compare KM with its structural analogs, such as (1) Modern Japanese no-da, (2) its corollary in Japanese Western Periphery dialects, and (3) English it-clefts.

Finally, the authors apply iconicity-based analyses and grammaticalization theory, interpreting correspondences between deictic-origin particles, which are shared, their epistemically unique musubi forms, and their respective functions.

Series:

Mee-Jeong Park

This book marks the first attempt to rationalise the meaning of Korean intonation, especially its boundary tones. Unlike other languages where various pragmatic and discourse meanings are delivered through the types of pitch accent (prominent pitch movement on stressed syllable) and the types of phrase-final boundary tones, Korean delivers the pragmatic/discourse meaning mainly by the types of phrase-final boundary tones. This is possible because Korean has at least nine boundary tones while other languages have two (or, even four or five if the boundary tone of a smaller phrase are included). Various examples are given that illustrate this three-way relationship, i.e., a specific meaning delivered by a certain type of boundary tone and a certain type of morphological marker in natural conversation.

New Materials on the Khitan Small Script

A Critical Edition of Xiao Dilu & Yelü Xiangwen

Series:

Yingzhe Wu and Juha Janhunen

This volume contains a state-of-the-art survey of Khitan Small Script studies, accompanied by a critical analysis of two recently discovered and previously unpublished epigraphic documents. The texts are reproduced in the original script, in transcription as well as in facsimile, and are supported by a preliminary translation, linguistic comments and index. This is the first ever critical edition of Khitan texts, and the two epigraphic documents analysed in the volume constitute a substantial addition to the extant corpus of Khitan Small Script materials.