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Henk De Waard

In Jeremiah 52 in the Context of the Book of Jeremiah, Henk de Waard offers a thorough examination of the final chapter of the book of Jeremiah. Particular attention is paid to the chapter’s relationship with the parallel text in 2 Kings 24:18–25:30, to the differences between the Masoretic text and the Old Greek translation, to the literary function of Jeremiah 52 within the book of Jeremiah, and to the chapter’s historical context.
De Waard shows that, especially in the early text form represented by the Old Greek, Jeremiah 52 is not a mere appendix to the book, but a golah-oriented epilogue, indicating the contrasting destinies of pre-exilic Judah and the exilic community in Babylon.

Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham

Introduction, Translation, and Commentary

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Ellen Birnbaum and John M. Dillon

On the Life of Abraham displays Philo’s philosophical, exegetical, and literary genius at its best. Philo begins by introducing the biblical figures Enos, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as unwritten laws. Then, interweaving literal, ethical, and allegorical interpretations, Philo presents the life and achievements of Abraham, founder of the Jewish nation, in the form of a Greco-Roman bios, or biography. Ellen Birnbaum and John Dillon explain why and how this work is important within the context of Philo’s own oeuvre, early Jewish and Christian exegesis, and ancient philosophy. They also offer a new English translation and detailed analyses, in which they elucidate the meaning of Philo’s thought, including his perplexing notion that Israel’s ancestors were laws in themselves.

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Film- und Mediengeschichte im Zeitalter der digitalen Reproduzierbarkeit

Franziska Heller

Nie schien der Zugriff auf Filmgeschichte leichter als heute: Mit wenigen Klicks kann man etwa ‚Klassiker‘ anschauen, sie kopieren und teilen – noch dazu digital remastered, ‚schöner als je zuvor‘! In der jüngeren Medienkultur werden ehemals analoge Filme digitalisiert, durchlaufen ständige Transformationen, um in neuen Medienumgebungen sichtbar zu bleiben. Die Studie widmet sich den grundsätzlichen Fragen, in welcher Form die vermeintlich allgegenwärtig verfügbaren Bewegt-Bilder aus der Filmgeschichte überhaupt in die Zirkulation der digitalen Kultur gelangen und welche ästhetischen, theoretischen, sozio-kulturellen wie historiographischen Konsequenzen sich daraus ergeben.

The Annotated Critical Laozi

With Contemporary Explication and Traditional Commentary

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Guying Chen

Edited by Paul D'Ambrosio

Biblical Women in Contemporary Novels in English

From Margaret Atwood to Jenny Diski

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Ingrid Bertrand

How are well-known female characters from the Bible represented in late 20th-century novels? In Biblical Women in Contemporary Novels in English, Ingrid Bertrand presents a detailed analysis of biblical rewritings by Roberts, Atwood, Tennant, Diamant and Diski focusing on six different women (Eve, Noah’s wife, Sarah, Bilhah, Dinah and Mary Magdalene). She shows how these heroines give themselves a voice that rests not only on words but also on silences. Exploring the many forms that silence can take, she presents an innovative typology that sheds new light on this profoundly meaningful phenomenon.

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Edited by Jan Bloemendal

This is an edition of the Latin text of Daniel Heinsius’ Latin tragedy Auriacus, sive Libertas saucia (Orange, or Liberty Wounded, 1602), , with an introduction, a translation and a commentary. Auriacus was Heinsius’ history drama, with which he wished to bring Dutch drama to the level of antiquity.

Euroscepticisms

The Historical Roots of a Political Challenge

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Edited by Mark Gilbert and Daniele Pasquinucci

Euroscepticism has become a political challenge of imposing size. The belief that the EU would continue, inexorably, to increase its responsibilities, its membership, and its credibility with the electorates of Europe seems like a pipedream. Almost every major European country now has a political party (whether of the left or right) that is openly opposed to the EU’s institutions and core policies. However, a political phenomenon on this scale did not spring up, mushroom-like, overnight. Sentiments, attitudes and political standpoints against the European Union have deep roots in the national histories of the various member states. This book assembles a group of scholars from across Europe to investigate the long-term origins and causes of Euroscepticism in an apposite range of EU countries.

Contributors are: Gabriele D'Ottavio, Kira Gartzou-Katsouyanni, Mark Gilbert, Adéla Gjuričová, Simona Guerra, Thorsten Borring Olesen, Daniele Pasquinucci, Emmanuelle Reungoat, Paul Taggart, Antonio Varsori, and Hans Vollaard.

Global Healing

Literature, Advocacy, Care

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Karen Laura Thornber

In Global Healing: Literature, Advocacy, Care, Karen Laura Thornber analyzes how narratives from diverse communities globally engage with a broad variety of diseases and other serious health conditions and advocate for empathic, compassionate, and respectful care that facilitates healing and enables wellbeing.

The three parts of this book discuss writings from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania that implore societies to shatter the devastating social stigmas which prevent billions from accessing effective care; to increase the availability of quality person-focused healthcare; and to prioritize partnerships that facilitate healing and enable wellbeing for both patients and loved ones.

Thornber’s Global Healing remaps the contours of comparative literature, world literature, the medical humanities, and the health humanities.

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Edited by Christa Gray and James Corke-Webster

The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood throws fresh light on narratives about Christian holy men and women from Late Antiquity to Byzantium. Rather than focusing on the relationship between story and reality, it asks what literary choices authors made in depicting their heroes and heroines: how they positioned the narrator, how they responded to existing texts, how they utilised or transcended genre conventions for their own purposes, and how they sought to relate to their audiences. The literary focus of the chapters assembled here showcases the diversity of hagiographical texts written in Greek, Latin, Coptic, and Syriac, as well as pointing out the ongoing conversations that connect them. By asking these questions of this diverse group of texts, it illuminates the literary development of hagiography in the late antique, Byzantine, and medieval periods.