Browse results

Domestic Courts and the Interpretation of International Law

Methods and Reasoning Based on the Swiss Example

Series:

Odile Ammann

Series:

Edited by Michał Gałędek and Anna Klimaszewska

The driving force of the dynamic development of world legal history in the past few centuries, with the dominance of the West, was clearly the demands of modernisation – transforming existing reality into what is seen as modern. The need for modernisation, determining the development of modern law, however, clashed with the need to preserve cultural identity rooted in national traditions. With selected examples of different legal institutions, countries and periods, the authors of the essays in the two volumes Modernization, National Identity and Legal Instrumentalism: Studies in Comparative Legal History, vol. I:Private Law and Modernization, National Identity and Legal Instrumentalism: Studies in Comparative Legal History, vol. II: Public Law seek to explain the nature of this problem.

Contributors are Michał Gałędek, Katrin Kiirend-Pruuli, Anna Klimaszewska, Łukasz Jan Korporowicz, Beata J. Kowalczyk, Marju Luts-Sootak, Marcin Michalak, Annamaria Monti, Zsuzsanna Peres, Sara Pilloni, Hesi Siimets-Gross, Sean Thomas, Bart Wauters, Steven Wilf, and Mingzhe Zhu.

Series:

Edited by Michał Gałędek and Anna Klimaszewska

The driving force of the dynamic development of world legal history in the past few centuries, with the dominance of the West, was clearly the demands of modernisation – transforming existing reality into what is seen as modern. The need for modernisation, determining the development of modern law, however, clashed with the need to preserve cultural identity rooted in national traditions. With selected examples of different legal institutions, countries and periods, the authors of the essays in the two volumes Modernization, National Identity and Legal Instrumentalism: Studies in Comparative Legal History, vol. I: Private Law and Modernization, National Identity and Legal Instrumentalism: Studies in Comparative Legal History, vol. II: Public Law seek to explain the nature of this problem.

Contributors are Judit Beke-Martos, Jiří Brňovják, Marjorie Carvalho de Souza, Michał Gałędek, Imre Képessy, Ivan Kosnica, Simon Lavis, Maja Maciejewska-Szałas, Tadeusz Maciejewski, Thomas Mohr, Balázs Pálvölgyi, and Marek Starý.

Visions of Sharīʿa

Contemporary Discussions in Shī ͑ī Legal Theory

Series:

Edited by Ali-reza Bhojani, Laurens de Rooij and Michael Bohlander

In Visions of Sharīʿa Bhojani, De Rooij and Bohlander present the first broad examination of ways in which legal theory ( uṣūl al-fiqh) within Twelver Shīʿī thought continues to be a forum for vibrant debates regarding the assumptions, epistemology and hermeneutics of Sharīʿa in contemporary Shīʿī thought. Bringing together authoritative voices and emerging scholars, from both ‘traditional’ seminaries and ‘Western’ academies, the distinct critical insider and emic accounts provided develop a novel avenue in Islamic legal studies. Contextualised through reference to the history of Shīʿī legal theory as well as contemporary juristic practice and socio-political considerations, the volume demonstrates how one of the most intellectually vibrant and developed discourses of Islamic thought continues to be a key forum for exploring visions of Sharīʿa.

Judicial Cosmopolitanism

The Use of Foreign Law in Contemporary Constitutional Systems

Edited by Giuseppe Franco Ferrari

Judicial Cosmopolitanism: The Use of Foreign Law in Contemporary Constitutional Systems offers a detailed account of the use of foreign law by supreme and constitutional Courts of Europe, America and East Asia.
The individual contributions highlight the ways in which the use of foreign law is carried out by the individual courts and the path that led the various Courts to recognize the relevance, for the purpose of the decision, to foreign law. The authors try to highlight reasons and types of the more and more frequent circulation of foreign precedents in the case law of most high courts. At the same time, they show the importance of this practice in the so-called neo constitutionalism.

Reason and Fairness

Constituting Justice in Europe, from Medieval Canon Law to ECHR

Series:

Ulrike Müßig

Throughout Europe, the exercise of justice rests on judicial independence by impartiality. In Reason and Fairness Ulrike Müßig reveals the combination of ordinary judicial competences with procedural rationality, together with the complementarity of procedural and substantive justice, as the foundation for the ‘rule of law’ in court constitution, far earlier than the advent of liberal constitutionalism. The ECHR fair trial guarantee reads as the historically-grown consensus of the functional judicial independence. Both before historical and contemporary courts, justice is done and seen to be done by means of judgements, whose legal requirements combine the equation of ‘fair’ and ‘legal’ with that of ‘legal’ and ‘rational.’ This legal determinability of the judge’s fair attitude amounts to the specific (rational) European idea of justice.

Edited by Council of Europe

Special missions play an increasing and crucial role in international diplomacy and yet the international law governing them remains to some extent uncertain. This book is based on the responses of States to the questionnaire of the Council of Europe Committee of Legal Advisers on Public International Law (CAHDI) on ‘Immunities of special missions’, considered against the background of the 1969 United Nations Convention on Special Missions, key judicial decisions and national legislation on special mission immunity, government statements, and other state practice and evidence of opinio juris. The book presents and analyses the international law and practice governing special missions, while identifying remaining areas of uncertainty.

This volume contains an up-to-date analysis of the law and practice of special missions, based on information from a wide range of States. It aims to provide a practical guide on this issue for governments, judges, practitioners, academics and students alike.

Immunités des missions spéciales
Les missions spéciales jouent un rôle croissant et crucial sur la scène diplomatique internationale et pourtant, le droit international qui les régit reste dans une certaine mesure incertain. Ce livre s’appuie sur les réponses des Etats au questionnaire du Comité des conseillers juridiques sur le droit international public (CAHDI) du Conseil de l'Europe sur les « immunités des missions spéciales », à la lumière de la Convention des Nations Unies sur les missions spéciales de 1969, de la législation nationale et de la jurisprudence sur l'immunité des missions spéciales, des déclarations gouvernementales et d'autres pratiques étatiques et la preuve de l' opinio juris. L’ouvrage présente et analyse le droit international et la pratique régissant les missions spéciales, tout en identifiant les domaines où des incertitudes subsistent.

Ce volume contient une analyse à jour de la législation et de la pratique relatives aux missions spéciales, basée sur des informations provenant de nombreux Etats. Il vise à fournir un guide pratique sur cette question pour les gouvernements, les juges, les praticiens, les universitaires et les étudiants.

Christopher E. Bailey

This book examines the existing counter-terrorism laws and practices in the six-member East African Community (EAC) as it applies to a range of law enforcement and military activities under various international legal obligations. Dr. Christopher E. Bailey provides a comparative examination of existing national law for EAC countries, including compliance with obligations under international human rights and international humanitarian law, and offers a range of legal reform recommendations. This book addresses two primary, related research questions: To what extent do the current national counter-terrorism laws and practices of the EAC Partner States comply with existing international human rights safeguards? What laws or practices can the EAC adopt to achieve better compliance with human rights safeguards in both civilian and military counter-terrorism operations?

Corporal Punishment of Children

Comparative Legal and Social Developments towards Prohibition and Beyond

Series:

Edited by Bernadette Saunders, Pernilla Leviner and Bronwyn Naylor

Corporal Punishment of Children - Comparative Legal and Social Developments towards Prohibition and Beyond provides insights into the views and experiences of prominent academics, and political, religious, and human rights activists from Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, the UK, and the US. Country-specific and thematic insights in relation to children’s ongoing experience of corporal punishment are detailed and discussed, and key questions are raised and considered with a view to advancing progress towards societies in which children’s human rights to dignity and optimal development are more fully recognised.

Series:

Sergey Yu. Marochkin

This book addresses the increased role and standing of international law in the Russian legal system through analysis of judicial practice since the adoption of the Russian Constitution in 1993. The issue of interaction and hierarchy between international and domestic law within the Russian Federation is studied, combining theoretical, legal and institutional elements.
Sergey Marochkin explores how methods for incorporating and implementing international law (or reasons for failing to do so) have changed over time, influenced by internal and global policy. The final sections of the book are the most illustrative, examining how 'the rule of law’ remains subordinate to ‘the rule of politics’, both at the domestic and global level.