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Volume Editors: Susana Zapke and Elisabeth Gruber
This volume offers a comprehensive introduction to the major political, social, economic, and cultural developments in Vienna from c. 1100 to c. 1500. It provides a multidisciplinary view of the complexity of the vibrant city on the Danube. The volume is divided into four sections: Vienna, the city and urban design;, politics, economy and sovereignty; social groups and communities; , and spaces of knowledge, arts, and performance. An international team of eighteen scholars examines issues ranging from the city’s urban environment and art history, to economic and social concerns., using a range of sources and reflecting the wide array of possible approaches to the study of medieval Vienna today.

Contributors are: Csendes Peter, Denk Ulrike, Ertl Thomas, Gastgeber Christian, Haffner Thomas, Keil Martha, Kirchweger Franz, Krause Heike, Lutter Christina, Mitchell Paul, Mühlberger Kurt, Opačić Zoë, Opll Ferdinand, Schedl Barbara, Sonnlechner Christoph, and Wright Peter.
Volume Editors: Clifford Davidson and Sophie Oosterwijk
This edition of Lydgate’s Dance of Death offers a detailed comparison of the different text versions, a new scholarly edition and translation of Marchant’s 1485 French Danse Macabre and an art-historical analysis of its woodcuts.
It addresses the cultural context and historical circumstances of Lydgate’s poem and its model, the mural of 1424-25 with accompanying French poem in Paris, as well as their precursors, notably the Vado mori poems and the Legend of the Three Living and the Three Dead. It discusses authorship, the personification and visualisation of Death, and the wider dissemination of the Dance. The edited texts include commentaries, notes and a glossary.
On the Hybrid Nature of the Book in the Age of Electronic Publishing
Refresh the Book contains reflections on the multimodal nature of the book, focusing on its changing perception, functions, forms, and potential in the digital age. Offering an overview of key concepts and approaches, such as liberature, technotexts, and bookishness, this volume of essays addresses specificity of the printed book as a complex cultural phenomenon. It discusses diverse forms of representation and expression, both in literary and non-literary texts, as well as in artist’s books. Of special interest are these aspects of the book which resist remediation into the digital form. Finally, the volume contains an extensive section devoted to artistic practice as research, discussing the book as a kind of total work, and site for performative aesthetic activity.

Christin Barbarino, Katarzyna Bazarnik, Christoph Bläsi, Sarah Bodman, Hélène Campaignolle(?), Zenon Fajfer, Annette Gilbert, Susanne Gramatzki, Mareike Herbstreit, Viola Hildebrand-Schat, Thomas Hvid Kromann, Monika Jäger, Eva Linhart, Bettina Lockemann, Patrizia Meinert, Bernhard Metz, Sebastian Schmideler, Monika Schmitz-Emans, Christoph Benjamin Schulz, usus (Uta Schneider & Ulrike Stoltz), Anne Thurmann-Jajes, Sakine Weikert, Gabriele Wix
Author: Robert Couzin
Robert Couzin’s Right and Left in Early Christian and Medieval Art is the first in-depth study of handedness, position, and direction in the visual culture of Europe and Byzantium from the fourth to the fourteenth century. An understanding of this largely unnoticed or ignored dimension of imagery can enrich the study of most major themes of medieval art history, including iconography, visuality, reception, narrative, form, gender, production, and patronage. For designers, artisans, and audiences alike, the pre-eminence of the right and lapses or intentional departures from that norm were potentially significant. This investigation of right and left in medieval visual culture is informed by modern experimental research on laterality and contextualized within prevailing theological doctrines and socio-cultural practices.
In Applied Emblems in the Cathedral of Lugo, Carme López Calderón deals with the emblematic programme found in the Chapel of Nuestra Señora de los Ojos Grandes (Galicia, Spain), consisting of 58 emblems painted c.1735.

Making use of a wide range of printed sources, Carme López Calderón delves into the meaning of each emblem and provides a convincing and compelling all-encompassing interpretation of this cycle, which can rightly be described as the richest and most complete programme of Marian applied emblematics in the Iberian Peninsula.
Sculpture in Print, 1480-1600 is the first monograph dedicated to the intriguing history of the translation of statues and reliefs into print. The multitude of engravings, woodcuts and etchings show a highly creative handling of the ‘original’ antique or contemporary work of art.
The essays in this volume reflect these various approaches to and challenges of translating sculpture in print. They analyze foremost the beginnings of the phenomenon in Italian and Northern Renaissance prints and they highlight by means of case studies amongst many other topics the interrelated terminology between sculpture and print, lost models in print, the inventive handling of fragments, as well as the transformation of statues into narrative contexts.
The essays in Visualizing the Past in Italian Renaissance Art address a foundational concept that was as central to early modern thinking as it is to our own: that the past is always an important part of the present. Written by the friends, students, and colleagues of Dr. Brian Curran, former professor of Art History at the Pennsylvania State University, these authors demonstrate how reverberations of the past within the present are intrinsic to the ways in which we think about the history of art. Examinations of sculpture, painting, and architecture reveal the myriad ways that history has been appropriated, reinvented, and rewritten as subsequent generations—including the authors collected here—have attained new insight into the past and present.

Contributors include Denise Costanzo, William E. Wallace, Theresa A. Kutasz Christensen, Ingrid Rowland, Anthony Cutler, Marilyn Aronberg Lavin, Louis Alexander Waldman, Elizabeth Petersen Cyron, Stuart Lingo, Jessica Boehman, Katherine M. Bentz, Robin L. Thomas, and John Pinto.
Cultural Negotiations and Artistic Translations in the Middle Ages and 19th-century Historicism
Volume Editor: Francine Giese
Mudejarismo and Moorish Revival in Europe examines key aspects related to the reception of Ibero-Islamic architecture in medieval Iberia and 19th-century Europe. It challenges prevalent readings of architecture and interiors whose creation was the result of cultural encounters. As Mudéjar and neo-Moorish architecture are closely connected to the Islamic world, concepts of identity, nationalism, religious and ethnic belonging, as well as Orientalism and Islamoscepticism significantly shaped the way in which they have been perceived over time. This volume offers art historical and socio-cultural analysis of selected case studies from Spain to Russia and opens the door to a better understanding of interconnected cultural and artistic phenomena.
Contributors are (in order of appearance) Francine Giese, Ariane Varela Braga, Michael A. Conrad, Katrin Kaufmann, Sarah Keller, Elena Paulino Montero, Luis Araus Ballesteros, Ekaterina Savinova, Christian Schweizer, Alejandro Jiménez Hernández and Laura Álvarez Acosta.
A Companion to Late Medieval and Early Modern Siena presents chapters by prominent scholars on the powerful commune that birthed a pope, sheltered saints, built banking institutions that have thrived for nearly 1000 years, and nurtured vibrant communities of artists and intellectuals. This multi-disciplinary book, edited by Santa Casciani and Heather Richardson Hayton, redresses scholarly imbalances of the past by introducing early period Siena to a wider audience. Focusing mostly on the 12th to 16th centuries, each chapter explores how the Sienese crafted a distinctive civic identity that remains intact still. Modern readers will find Siena’s responses to plague, political factionalism, and aggression from powerful neighbours particularly relevant.
Contributors are: Mario Ascheri, Saverio Luigi Battente, Elena Brizio, Santa Casciani, Konrad Eisenbichler, Bradley Franco, Fabrizio Nevola, Anna Peterson, Colleen Reardon, Sheri Shaneyfelt, Jane Tylus, Andrea Beth Wenz, Demetrio Yocum.