Browse results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 208 items for :

  • Historical and Comparative Linguistics & Linguistic Typology x
Clear All

Turba Philosophorum Congrès pythagoricien sur l’art d’Hermès

Edition critique, traduction et présentation

Series:

Grégoire Lacaze

La Turba Philosophorum est un traité dont l’original arabe est perdu, et qui est l’un des textes fondateurs de l’alchimie latine. Mais son intérêt dépasse de loin l’histoire de l’alchimie : s’alimentant à des sources aussi diverses que Zosime de Panopolis, Stéphanos d’Alexandrie ou, plus surprenant, Hippolyte de Rome, la Turba se situe au confluent de nombreuses traditions grecques (philosophiques, hermétiques et patristiques), et porte témoignage à la fois de l’histoire de la transmission du savoir grec, et de celle de sa réception dans l’Égypte du IXe siècle. L’étude de la structure du traité montre en outre l’exceptionnelle originalité du projet philosophique de son auteur : construire un cheminement permettant au lecteur de s’approprier la doctrine des “philosophes” grecs.

The Turba Philosophorum is a treatise whose Arabic original is lost, and which is one of the founding texts of Latin alchemy. But its interest goes far beyond the history of alchemy: using sources as different as Zosimus of Panopolis, Stephanos of Alexandria or, more surprising, Hippolyte of Rome, the Turba is at the confluence of many Greek traditions (philosophical, hermetic and patristic), and bears testimony both to the history of the transmission of Greek knowledge, and of its reception in Egypt in the ninth century. The study of the structure of the treatise also shows the exceptional originality of the philosophical project of its author: to construct a path allowing the reader to appropriate the doctrine of Greek "philosophers".

The Semantics of Verbal Categories in Nakh-Daghestanian Languages

Tense, Aspect, Evidentiality, Mood and Modality

Series:

Edited by Diana Forker and Timur Maisak

The Caucasus is the place with the greatest linguistic variation in Europe. The present volume explores this variation within the tense, aspect, mood, and evidentiality systems in the languages of the North-East Caucasian (or Nakh-Daghestanian) family. The papers of the volume cover the most challenging and typologically interesting features such as aspect and the complicated interaction of aspectual oppositions expressed by stem allomorphy and inflectional paradigms, grammaticalized evidentiality and mirativity, and the semantics of rare verbal categories such as the deliberative (‘May I go?’), the noncurative (‘Let him go, I don’t care’), different types of habituals (gnomic, qualitative, non-generic), and perfective tenses (aorist, perfect, resultative). The book offers an overview of these features in order to gain a broader picture of the verbal semantics covering the whole North-East Caucasian family. At the same time it provides in-depth studies of the most fascinating phenomena.

Omani Mehri

A New Grammar with Texts

Series:

Aaron D. Rubin

This book contains a comprehensive grammatical description of Mehri, an unwritten Semitic language spoken in the Dhofar region of Oman, along with a corpus of more than one hundred texts. Topics in phonology, all aspects of morphology, and a variety of syntactic features are covered. The texts, presented with extensive commentary, were collected by the late T.M. Johnstone. Some are published here for the first time, while the rest have been newly edited and translated, based on the original manuscripts. Semitists, linguists, and anyone interested in the folklore of southern Arabia will find much valuable data and analysis in this volume, which is the most detailed grammatical study of a Modern South Arabian language yet published.

Old Russian Birchbark Letters

A Pragmatic Approach

Series:

Simeon Dekker

This study is devoted to a corpus of Old Russian letters, written on pieces of birchbark. These unique texts from Novgorod and surroundings give us an exceptional impression of everyday life in medieval Russian society. In this study, the birchbark letters are addressed from a pragmatic angle. Linguistic parameters are identified that shed light on the degree to which literacy had gained ground in communicative processes. It is demonstrated that the birchbark letters occupy an intermediate position between orality and literacy. On the one hand, oral habits of communication persisted, as reflected in how the birchbark letters are phrased; on the other hand, literate modes of expression emerged, as seen in the development of normative conventions and literate formulae.

Advances in Italian Dialectology

Sketches of Italo-Romance Grammars

Series:

Edited by Roberta D'Alessandro and Diego Pescarini

This volume is a collection of grammar sketches from several Italo-Romance varieties.
The contributions cover various areas of linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax)
and are organized in sections according to the customary geolinguistic classification.
Each chapter provides the description of a salient phenomenon for a given language,
based on novel data, as well as the state-of-the-art knowledge on that phenomenon.
The articles are in-depth studies carried out by prominent experts as well as promising
young scholars.
The theoretical apparatus is kept to a minimum in order to make the book accessible to
scholars without specific expertise. For the same reason, hypotheses and formalisms are
introduced gradually, only if necessary for the description of the data.

Philology of the Grasslands

Essays in Mongolic, Turkic, and Tungusic Studies

Series:

Edited by Ákos Bertalan Apatóczky and Christopher P. Atwood

Professor György Kara, an outstanding member of academia, celebrated his 80th birthday recently. His students and colleagues commemorate this occasion with papers on a wide range of topics in Altaic Studies, with a focus on the literacy, culture and languages of the steppe civilizations.

Jane Austen Speaks Norwegian

The Challenges of Literary Translation

Series:

Marie N. Sørbø

What can translations reveal about the global reception of any authorship? In Jane Austen Speaks Norwegian: The Challenges of Literary Translation, Marie Nedregotten Sørbø compares two novels and six translations of them. The discussion is entirely in English, as all Norwegian versions are back-translated. This study therefore lends itself to comparisons with other languages, and aims to fill its place as one component in a worldwide field of research; how Jane Austen is understood and transmitted. Moreover, this book presents a selection of pertinent issues for any translator, including abbreviation and elaboration, style and vocabulary, and censorship. Sørbø gives vivid examples of how literary translation happens, and how it serves to interpret and refashion literature for new readerships.

Series:

Ambjörn Sjörs

In Historical Aspects of Standard Negation in Semitic Ambjörn Sjörs investigates the grammar of standard negation in a wide selection of Semitic languages. The bulk of the investigation consists of a detailed analysis of negative constructions and is based on a first-hand examination of the examples in context.

The main issues that are investigated in the book relate to the historical change of the expression of verbal negation in Semitic and the reconstruction of the genealogical relationship of negative constructions. It shows how negation is constantly renewed from the reanalysis of emphatic negative constructions, and how structural asymmetries between negative constructions and the corresponding affirmative constructions arise from the linguistically conservative nature of negative vis-à-vis affirmative clauses.

Series:

Edited by Klaas Spronk and Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman

Hebrew Texts in Jewish, Christian and Muslim Surroundings offers a new perspective on Judaism, Christianity and Islam as religions of the book. Their problematic relation seems to indicate that there is more that divides than unites these religions. The present volume will show that there is an intricate web of relations between the texts of these three religious traditions. On many levels readings and interpretations intermingle and influence each other. Studying the multifaceted history of the way Hebrew texts were read and interpreted in so many different contexts may contribute to a better understanding of the complicated relation between Jews, Christians and Muslims. These studies are dedicated to Dineke Houtman honouring her work as professor of Jewish-Christian relations.

Medical Glossaries in the Hebrew Tradition: Shem Tov Ben Isaac, Sefer Almansur

With a Supplement on the Romance and Latin Terminology

Series:

Gerrit Bos, Guido Mensching and Julia Zwink

The Sefer Almansur contains a pharmacopeia of about 250 medicinal ingredients with their Arabic names (in Hebrew characters), their Romance (Old Occitan) and occasionally Hebrew equivalents. The pharmacopeia, which describes the properties and therapeutical uses of simple drugs featured at the end of Book Three of the Sefer Almansur. This work was translated into Hebrew from the Arabic Kitāb al-Manṣūrī (written by al-Rāzī) by Shem Tov ben Isaac of Tortosa, who worked in Marseille in the 13th century.

Gerrit Bos, Guido Mensching and Julia Zwink supply a critical edition of the Hebrew text, an English translation and an analysis of the Romance and Latin terminology in Hebrew transcription. The authors show the pharmaceutical terminological innovation of Hebrew and of the vernacular, and give us proof of the important role of medieval Jews in preserving and transferring medical knowledge.