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L’affirmation de soi chez les historiens, de l’Antiquité à la fin du Moyen Age

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Cristian Bratu

In L’affirmation de soi chez les historiens, Cristian Bratu discusses authorial self-representations and self-promotion strategies in the works of ancient and medieval historians, from Herodotus (5th c. BC) to Philippe de Commynes (15th c. AD). After describing the emergence of an author figure in the works of ancient Greek and Roman historians, Bratu shows that, in spite of the emphasis placed by the nascent Christian civilization on humility, medieval historians were anything but self-effacing. Subsequently, he focuses on the authorial figures of French medieval historians who wrote in the vernacular between the 12th and 15th centuries. Bratu uses a variety of approaches (philology, codicology, narratology) in order to shed new light on the authorial figures of ancient and medieval historians.

Dans L’affirmation de soi chez les historiens, Cristian Bratu étudie la figure de l’auteur dans les œuvres des historiens antiques et médiévaux, d’Hérodote (Ve siècle av. J.-C.) à Philippe de Commynes (XVe siècle ap. J.-C.). Après une section dédiée à l’émergence d’une figure d’auteur chez les historiens de l’Antiquité gréco-romaine, Bratu montre que malgré l’importance accordée à l’humilité dans la civilisation chrétienne naissante, les historiens médiévaux furent tout sauf modestes. Cette étude se concentre ensuite sur les figures des historiens de langue française entre le XIIe et le XVe siècle. En s’appuyant sur différentes méthodes (philologie, codicologie, narratologie), Cristian Bratu apporte un éclairage nouveau sur la figure de l’auteur chez les historiens antiques et médiévaux.

Volubilis après Rome

Les fouilles UCL/INSAP, 2000-2005

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Edited by Elizabeth Fentress and Hassan Limane

Le site archéologique le plus visité au Maroc, Volubilis est connu depuis longtemps pour ses mosaïques spectaculaires. Ce livre traite de ce qui est arrivé à la ville après le retrait de l'administration romaine à la fin du troisième siècle. Les fouilles publiées ici montrent comment la ville a continué à survivre jusqu'au cinquième siècle, avec des maisons d'élite commandant encore des mosaïques élégantes, et comment cette occupation a pris fin dans un séisme brutal. La ville renaît au sixième siècle avec de nouveaux occupants, la tribu berbère des Awraba. Au VIIIe siècle, il devint le siège de l'homme qui unit la plus grande partie du Maroc à la tête de l'Awraba, Idris I, descendant du prophète Mahomet.

The most-visited archaeological site in Morocco, Volubilis has long been known for its spectacular mosaics. Instead, this book deals with what happened to the town after the Roman administration was withdrawn at the end of the third century. The excavations published here show how the town continued to survive into the fifth century, with élite houses still commissioning elegant and witty mosaics, and how this occupation came to an end in a brutal earthquake. The town revived in the sixth century with new occupants, the Berber Awraba tribe. In the eighth century, it became the headquarters of the man who united most of Morocco at the head of the Awraba, Idris I, a descendant of the prophet Mohammed.

Contributeurs/Contributors: Ali Aït Kaci, Victoria Amoros-Ruiz, Mustafa Atki, Amira K. Bennison, Helen Dawson, Fatima-Zohra El-Harrif, Hafsa El Hassani, Abdallah Fili, Dorian Fuller, Guy Hunt, Anthony King, Tarik Moujoud, Gaetano Palumbo, Ruth Pelling, Susan Walker, Mark Wilson Jones.

Datini, Majorque et le Maghreb (14e-15e siècles)

Réseaux, espaces méditerranéens et stratégies marchandes

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Ingrid- Houssaye Michienzi

This book addresses a question that has been somewhat neglected in the many studies of the mercantile operations of the ‘merchant of Prato’, Francesco di Marco Datini, in the years around 1400: the operations of his firm in the Maghrib, a region in which he and his colleagues had to operate through agents, rather than by means of branches or sister companies based in the region. Thanks to the voluminous material of the Datini archive in Prato, it offers a reconstruction of commercial strategies through the study of networks, of economic actors, their identity and their practices, and of the link between trade and the State, especially the Florentine one.

Le sucre

Production, commercialisation et usages dans la Méditerranée médiévale

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Mohamed Ouerfelli

The following study analyses the factors behind the spread of sugar cane from the East to the West, the geography of its establishment in the Mediterranean era and reconstitutes the processes of sugar production and the organisation of work in the plantations and medieval sugar factories. It questions the quality of sugar produced and the evolution of prices of this commodity. It establishes the conditions of its transport and trade. Finally, it studies the different uses of sugar, including in medicins and diets. Sugar was triumphant as a food stuff and became an indispensable ingredient in the confectionery and pastry, which decorated the tables of the royal courts. It remained a luxury product reserved for the high society.

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Patrick Gilli, Jacques Verger and Daniel Le Blévec

In the Middle Ages, the presence of a university was a source of prestige, allure and human resources for the host town, to the extent that urban authorities sought to prevent any attempt to secede to another city. However, if the benefits of a university seemed obvious (although some major cities in medieval Europe never had one, nor sought to have one), the risks of its presence were not negligible: trouble and disorder, the privileges of the students and the Masters, etc. This book seeks to make an assessment, on a European scale, of the various ways in which the university was integrated into the city: in urban respects as much as cultural, the Studium generale marked its town, and the members of the university were often used by local institutions to be drawn upon as if from a fish pond. Contributors are: Angel Vaca Lorenzo, José Martin Martin, Carlos Heusch, Jacques Verger, Jürgen Miethke, Robert Gramsch, Karl Ubl, Sante Bortolami, Elda Forin, Carla Frova, Patrick Gilli, Nathalie Gorochov, Julian Munby, Olivier Marin and Maria Helena da Cruz Coelho.

Les Alchandreana primitifs

Étude sur les plus anciens traités astrologiques latins d'origine arabe (Xe siècle)

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David Juste

It is well known that medieval Europe owes most of its scientific learning to the translations of Arabic treatises made in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The earliest Arabic infiltrations in Latin science are however much older. They can be traced back to the tenth century and to the making, in Catalonia, of a large corpus of astrological treatises: the Alchandreana. Based mainly on Arabic sources, but also on Hebrew and Latin sources, the Alchandreana constitute an exceptional testimony of cross-cultural exchanges between Christian, Arabic and Jewish scholars before the turn of the first millenium. This book offers a historical study, a technical analysis and a critical edition of the whole corpus.

Brill's Texts and Sources in Intellectual History, vol. 2