Series:

Krzysztof Nawotka

The Alexander Romance by Ps.-Callisthenes of Krzysztof Nawotka is a guide to a third century AD fictional biography of Alexander the Great, the anonymous Historia Alexandri Magni. It is a historical commentary which identifies all names and places in this piece of Greek literature approached as a source for the history of Alexander the Great, from kings, like Nectanebo II of Egypt and Darius III of Persia, to fictional characters. It discusses real and imaginary geography of the Alexander Romance. While dealing with all aspects of Ps.-Callisthenes relevant to Greek history and to Macedonia, its pays particular attention to aspects of ancient history and culture of Babylonia and Egypt and to the multi-layered foundation story of Alexandria.

Bilderwelten: Ägyptische Bilder und ägyptologische Kunst

Vorarbeiten für eine bildwissenschaftliche Ägyptologie

Series:

Kai Widmaier

Egyptologists have been debating for decades about whether or not Egyptian images classify as art. Nevertheless, the term ‘art’ still serves as a guiding concept for Egyptology. Kai Widmaier offers an overview of how different art-historical interpretive methods influence Egyptological research. His study demonstrates that, due to its adherence to the term art, Egyptology has considerably dissociated Egyptian images from their original contexts.
Bilderwelten combines the analysis of Egyptian images from the 6th to the 18th Dynasty with methodological reflection. This leads to both a new terminology of style as well as to an alternative approach to Egyptian images. By differentiating systematically between Egyptian images and Egyptological art, this book lays the foundation for an Egyptology that follows the path of Visual Studies instead of adhering to questionable art-historical methods.

Die Gräberfelder von Sedment im Neuen Reich (2 vols.)

Materielle und kulturelle Variation im Bestattungswesen des ägyptischen Neuen Reiches

Series:

Henning Franzmeier

In Die Gräberfelder von Sedment im Neuen Reich, Henning Franzmeier presents and reassesses the complete results of the previously only partially published excavations undertaken by W.M.F. Petrie and G. Brunton in the New Kingdom cemeteries of Sedment, Middle Egypt, from 1920 to 1921. Through his research, Franzmeier has expanded the corpus of known New Kingdom tombs at Sedment from about 50 to more than 250, including burials of high-ranking officials, and identified a wide range of previously unknown objects. Presenting the development of an important provincial cemetery, this publication provides a valuable contribution to our understanding of New Kingdom Egyptian funerary archaeology and, as a case study, highlights the potentials of reassessing the results of past excavations.

Nefertiti’s Sun Temple (2 vols.)

A New Cult Complex at Tell el-Amarna

Series:

Jacquelyn Williamson

Nefertiti’s Sun Temple publishes stone relief fragments excavated from the site of Kom el-Nana at Tell el-Amarna, Egypt, dating to approximately 1350 BCE. This is the first time relief fragments can be associated with a specific wall from a specific temple at Tell el-Amarna.

Jacquelyn Williamson reconstructs the architecture, art, and inscriptions from the site to demonstrate Kom el-Nana is the location of Queen Nefertiti’s ‘Sunshade of Re’ temple and another more enigmatic structure that served the funerary needs of the non-royal courtiers at the ancient city. The art and inscriptions provide new information about Queen Nefertiti and challenge assumptions about her role in Pharaoh Akhenaten’s religious movement dedicated to the sun god Aten.

Punt

Die Suche nach dem 'Gottesland'

Series:

Francis Breyer

Francis Breyer's Punt. Die Suche nach dem ›Gottesland‹ covers every aspect concerning Punt, this land known only from ancient Egyptian sources. Several disciplines have contributed to the discussion on its localization: Egyptology, Nubien Studies, Botany, Zoology, Anthropology, and African Studies, among others. The various disciplines' arguments are carefully studied, especially with the history of research and the Zeitgeist in mind. For the very first time, the question is asked, which archaeological culture from the horn of Africa can be correlated to the data from the textual and iconographic sources, all of which are collected, translated and commented on. Breyer not only comprehensively reconstructs the entire organization of the Egyptian expeditions, i.e. participants, routes, trade goods, but also addresses the people of Punt, their cultural background and way of life.

Series:

Jacqueline E. Jay

In Orality and Literacy in the Demotic Tales, Jacqueline E. Jay extrapolates from the surviving ancient Egyptian written record hints of the oral tradition that must have run alongside it. The monograph’s main focus is the intersection of orality and literacy in the extremely rich corpus of Demotic narrative literature surviving from the Greco-Roman Period. The many texts discussed include the tales of the Inaros and Setna Cycles, the Myth of the Sun’s Eye, and the Dream of Nectanebo. Jacqueline Jay examines these Demotic tales not only in conjunction with earlier Egyptian literature, but also with the worldwide tradition of orally composed and performed discourse.

Series:

Stewart Moore

In Jewish Ethnic Identity and Relations in Hellenistic Egypt, Stewart Moore investigates the foundations of common assumptions about ethnicity. To maintain one’s identity in a strange land, was it always necessary to band tightly together with one’s coethnics? Sociologists and anthropologists who study ethnicity have given us a much wider view of the possible strategies of ethnic maintenance and interaction.

The most important facet of Jewish ethnicity in Egypt which emerges from this study is the interaction over the Jewish-Egyptian boundary. Previous scholarship has assumed that this border was a Siegfried Line marked by mutual contempt. Yet Jews, Egyptians and also Greeks interacted in complicated ways in Ptolemaic Egypt, with positive relationships being at least as numerous as negative ones.

Towards a New History for the Egyptian Old Kingdom

Perspectives on the Pyramid Age

Series:

Edited by Peter Der Manuelian and Thomas Schneider

The Pyramid Age represents the first of several highpoints in ancient Egypt’s long history. But critical questions remain about the period, its social structure and economic organization, and the long-term implications of its artistic achievements. On the occasion of the fifth anniversary of the Journal of Egyptian History, The University of British Columbia, Harvard University, and Brill Academic Publishers, Boston, held a conference at Harvard University on April 26, 2012. A distinguished group of Egyptological scholars from around the world gathered to consider new perspectives on the Pyramid Age; the results are presented here.

Series:

Edited by Timothy P. Harrison, Edward B. Banning and Stanley Klassen

Walls of the Prince offers a series of articles that explore Egyptian interactions with Southwest Asia during the second and first millennium BCE, including long-distance trade in the Middle Kingdom, the itinerary of Thutmose III’s great Syrian campaign, the Amman Airport structure, anthropoid coffins at Tell el-Yahudiya, Egypt’s relations with Israel in the age of Solomon, Nile perch and other trade with the southern Levant and Transjordan in the Iron Age, Saite strategy at Mezad Hashavyahu, and the concept of resident alien in Late Period Egypt. These are complemented by methodological and typological studies of data from the archaeological investigations at Tell al-Maskhuta, the Wadi Tumilat, and Mendes in the eastern Nile delta. Together, they reflect the diverse range of Professor Holladay’s long and distinguished scholarly career.

Series:

Edited by Laura da Graca and Andrea Zingarelli

In Studies on Pre-Capitalist Modes of Production British and Argentinian historians analyse the Asiatic, Germanic, peasant, slave, feudal, and tributary modes of production by exploring historical processes and diverse problems of Marxist theory. The emergence of feudal relations, the origin of the medieval craftsman, the functioning of the law of value and the conditions for historical change are some of the problems analysed. The studies treat an array of pre-capitalist social formations: Chris Wickham works on medieval Iceland and Norway, John Haldon on Byzantium, Carlos García Mac Gaw on the Roman Empire, Andrea Zingarelli on ancient Egypt, Carlos Astarita and Laura da Graca on medieval León and Castile, and Octavio Colombo on the Castilian later Middle Ages.

Contributors include: Chris Wickham, John Haldon, Carlos Astarita, Carlos García Mac Gaw, Octavio Colombo, Laura da Graca, and Andrea Zingarelli.