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Judicial Cosmopolitanism

The Use of Foreign Law in Contemporary Constitutional Systems

Edited by Giuseppe Franco Ferrari

Judicial Cosmopolitanism: The Use of Foreign Law in Contemporary Constitutional Systems offers a detailed account of the use of foreign law by supreme and constitutional Courts of Europe, America and East Asia.
The individual contributions highlight the ways in which the use of foreign law is carried out by the individual courts and the path that led the various Courts to recognize the relevance, for the purpose of the decision, to foreign law. The authors try to highlight reasons and types of the more and more frequent circulation of foreign precedents in the case law of most high courts. At the same time, they show the importance of this practice in the so-called neo constitutionalism.

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Edited by Olgun Akbulut and Elçin Aktoprak

This volume, Minority Self-Government in Europe and the Middle East: From Theory to Practice, is novel from several perspectives. It combines theory with facts on the ground, going beyond legal perspectives without neglecting existing laws and their implementation. Theoretical discussions transcend examining existing autonomy models in certain regions. It offers new models in the field, discussing such critical themes as environmentalism. Traditional concepts such as self-determination and well-known successful autonomy examples, including the Åland Islands, Basque and Catalonian models, are examined from different perspectives. Some chapters in this volume focus on certain regions (including Turkey, Syria, and Iraq) which have only recently received scholarly attention. Chapters complement one another in terms of their theoretical inputs and outputs from the field.

Imperial Villages

Cultures of Political Freedom in the German Lands c. 1300-1800

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Beat Kümin

Hundreds of rural communities tasted political freedom in the Holy Roman Empire. For shorter or longer periods, villagers managed local affairs without subjection to territorial overlords. In this first book-length study, Beat Kümin focuses on the five case studies of Gochsheim and Sennfeld (in present-day Bavaria), Sulzbach and Soden (Hesse) and Gersau (Switzerland). Adopting a comparative perspective across the late medieval and early modern periods, the analysis of multiple sources reveals distinct extents of rural self-government, the forging of communalized confessions and an enduring attachment to the empire. Negotiating inner tensions as well as mounting centralization pressures, Reichsdörfer provide privileged insights into rural micro-political cultures while their stories resonate with resurgent desires for greater local autonomy in Europe today.

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Holning Lau

In Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Discrimination Holning Lau offers an incisive review of the conceptual questions that arise as legal systems around the world grapple with whether and how to protect people against sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination. This volume is an essential guide for researchers seeking to acquaint themselves quickly with a comparative view of cutting-edge issues concerning sexual orientation and gender identity rights.

Other titles published in this series:
- Comparative Discrimination Law: Historical and Theoretical Frameworks, Laura Carlson; isbn 9789004345447
- International Human Rights Law and Discrimination Protections; A Comparison of Regional and National Responses, Mpoki Mwakagali; isbn 9789004345461
- Comparative Discrimination Law; Age as a Protected Ground, Lucy Vickers; isbn 9789004345539

New Challenges to International Law

A View from The Hague

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Edited by Steven van Hoogstraten

International law and the Hague, the city where so many institutions of international law are established, are intimately connected. This book presents the views developed by some of the active players in the legal capital of the world on a number of the current challenges faced by international law. The starting point was a seminar held in the Peace Palace, reviewing some of the legal policy questions of today, such as the acceptance of the jurisdiction of the ICJ as a prerequisite to dispute settlement. Supplementing these articles on classical international law are essays dealing with the younger discipline of international criminal law, as practiced by the ICC and other Tribunals, offering ideas on, among other things. how to speed up the lengthy procedures of international criminal tribunals. Other contributions debate the universality of human rights and their legal protection.

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Edited by Alice Valdesalici and Francesco Palermo

Comparing Fiscal Federalism investigates intergovernmental financial relations and the current de jure and de facto allocation of financial and fiscal powers in compound states from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The volume combines theoretical approaches with case studies and involves scholars from various disciplines, in order to provide a comprehensive analysis of different approaches, developments and trends. This includes outlining fiscal federalism’s basic principles and overall frameworks, investigating current constitutional/legislative settings and how financial systems function, as well as zooming in on a selection of emerging issues in financial and fiscal relations. The single chapters are based on comparative investigations under the umbrella of a broad definition of fiscal federalism that includes all varieties of federal systems.

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Giovanni Boggero

In Constitutional Principles of Local Self-Government in Europe Giovanni Boggero offers a meticulous account of the defining features of European constitutional local government law using both an international and comparative law perspective. The book argues that differences between local government systems in Europe, typical examples of internal affairs of a State, can be smoothed away by construing a consistent system of constitutional principles to be coherently applied at domestic level across the whole European legal space. This system can be best grasped by looking at the European Charter of Local Self-Government, which embodies a concept of self-government rooted in common legal traditions, and at its subsequent practice within the Council of Europe.

Concurrent Powers in Federal Systems

Meaning, Making, Managing

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Edited by Nico Steytler

Concurrency of powers – the exercise of jurisdiction by federal governments and constituent units in the same policy areas – is a key, if not the central, mode of governance in most federal systems today. Moreover, the experience has been that federal governments dominate the concurrent space giving rise to contestation. This volume, Concurrent Powers in Federal Systems: Meaning, Making and Managing, edited by Professor Nico Steytler, is the first to examine from a comparative perspective this crucial issue confronting both established and emerging federations. Case studies of 16 countries on five continents dissect the various manifestations of concurrency, analyse what drives this modern governance mode, and review management strategies that seek to guard against central dominance of concurrent areas.

Prosecuting Human Rights Offences

Rethinking the Sword Function of Human Rights Law

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Krešimir Kamber

In Prosecuting Human Rights Offences: Rethinking the Sword Function of Human Rights Law the author explores and explains the extent to which the features of the procedural obligation to investigate, prosecute and punish criminal attacks on human rights determine the contemporary understanding of the function of criminal prosecution. The author provides an innovative and thought-provoking account of the highly topical and largely unexplored topic of the sword function of human rights law. The book contains the first comprehensive and holistic analysis of the procedural obligation to investigate and prosecute human rights offences in the law of the European Convention on Human Rights, which the author puts in the general perspectives of human rights law and criminal procedure.

Law, Territory and Conflict Resolution

Law as a Problem and Law as a Solution

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Edited by Matteo Nicolini, Francesco Palermo and Enrico Milano

Prompted by the de facto secession of Crimea in early 2014, Law, Territory and Conflict Resolution explores the role of law in territorial disputes, and therefore sheds light on the legal ‘realities’ in territorial conflicts. Seventeen scholars with backgrounds in comparative constitutional law and international law critically reflect on the well-established assumption that law is ‘part of the solution’ in territorial conflicts and ask whether the law cannot equally be ‘part of the problem’. The volume examines theory, practice, legislation and jurisprudence from various case studies, thus offering further insights on the following complex issue: can law act as an effective instrument for the governance of territorial disputes and conflicts?