Warriors, Martyrs, and Dervishes

Moving Frontiers, Shifting Identities in the Land of Rome (13th-15th Centuries)

Series:

Buket Kitapçı Bayrı

Warriors, Martyrs, and Dervishes. Moving Frontiers, Shifting Identities in the Land of Rome (13th-15th Centuries) focuses on the perceptions of geopolitical and cultural change, which was triggered by the arrival of Turkish Muslim groups into the territories of the Byzantine Empire at the end of the eleventh century, through intersecting stories transmitted in Turkish Muslim warrior epics and dervish vitas, and late Byzantine martyria. It examines the Byzantines’ encounters with the newcomers in a shared story-world, here called “land of Rome,” as well as its perception, changing geopolitical and cultural frontiers, and in relation to these changes, the shifts in identity of the people inhabiting this space. The study highlights the complex relationship between the character of specific places and the cultural identities of the people who inhabited them.

Grounded Identities

Territory and Belonging in the Medieval and Early Modern Middle East and Mediterranean

Edited by Steve Tamari

Grounded Identities: Territory and Belonging in the Medieval and Early Modern Middle East and Mediterranean is a collection of essays on attachment to specific lands including Kurdistan, Andalusia and the Maghrib, and geographical Syria in the pre-modern Islamicate world. Together these essays put a premium on the affective and cultural dimensions of such attachments, fluctuations in the meaning and significance of lands in the face of historical transformations and, at the same time, the real and persistent qualities of lands and human attachments to them over long periods of time. These essays demonstrate that grounded identities are persistent and never static.

Contributors are: Zayde Antrim, Alexander Elinson, Mary Hoyt Halavais, Boris James, Steve Tamari.

Dār al-Islām Revisited

Territoriality in Contemporary Islamic Legal Discourse on Muslims in the West

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

Where is dār al-islām, and who defines its boundaries in the 21st century? In Dār al-Islām Revisited. Territoriality in Contemporary Islamic Legal Discourse on Muslims in the West, Sarah Albrecht explores the variety of ways in which contemporary Sunni Muslim scholars, intellectuals, and activists reinterpret the Islamic legal tradition of dividing the world into dār al-islām, the “territory of Islam,” dār al-ḥarb, the “territory of war,” and other geo-religious categories. Starting with an overview of the rich history of debate about this tradition, this book traces how and why territorial boundaries have remained a matter of controversy until today. It shows that they play a crucial role in current discussions of religious authority, identity, and the interpretation of the shariʿa in the West.

Atlas of the Near East

State Formation and the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1918-2010

Fabrice Balanche

The Atlas of the Near East offers an in-depth examination of the economic, social, and demographic dynamics of the Arab Near East, defined here as Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine, in the period from 1918 to 2010. It discusses the central problem of aridity, the effects of foreign domination, Arab nationalism, Baʿathism, and communitarianism. It addresses the makeup of the population, the region’s development, economic issues, cities, and urban areas. It assesses the partition of Palestine and the geography of the Occupied Territories, and concludes with a chapter on the geopolitics of the Near East. With numerous maps, charts, and data published for the first time, it is key to a comprehensive understanding of the region.

Muslim Sources on the Magyars in the Second Half of the 9th Century

The Magyar Chapter of the Jayhānī Tradition

Series:

Istvan Zimonyi

The Jayhānī tradition contains the most detailed description of the Magyars/Hungarians before the Conquest of the Carpathian Basin (895). Unfortunately, the book itself was lost and it can only be reconstructed from late Arabic, Persian and Turkic copies. The reconstruction is primarily based on the texts of al-Marwazī, Ibn Rusta and Gardīzī. The original text has shorter and longer versions. The basic text was reformed at least twice and later copyists added further emendation. This study focuses on the philological comments and historical interpretation of the Magyar chapter, integrating the results in the fields of medieval Islamic studies, the medieval history of Eurasian steppe, and the historiography of early Hungarian history.

Atlas of Southeast Europe

Geopolitics and History. Volume One: 1521-1699

Series:

Hans H.A. Hötte

This atlas offers a survey of the history of Southeast Europe from 1521 until 1699, from the first major land campaign undertaken by Sultan Süleyman I until the Treaty of Karlowitz at the end of the seventeenth century. It covers modern-day Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Romania (Walachia and Transylvania), Dalmatia, Greece and Cyprus.

Series:

Hakan T. Karateke

Evliyā Çelebī’s Journey from Bursa to the Dardanelles and Edirne is comprised of an edition and translation of the relevant section from Evliyā’s Book of Travels detailing the 29-day journey he undertook in the autumn of 1659 from Bursa to Edirne via the Dardanelles strait. Evliyā travelled in the retinue of grand vizier Köprülü Mehmed Pasha and Sultan Mehmed IV, who was travelling to inspect the two castles that were being built at the southern tip of each side of the Dardanelles. This was the only trip that Evliyā made to the region between Bursa and Edirne. This edition also includes a detailed annotated index of people and places as well as the geographic coordinates of all the locations and buildings mentioned in the text.

Philippe Cadène and Brigitte Dumortier

The Arab Gulf States possess more than half of the planet’s crude oil reserves, and their gas reserves are immense. The transition from being rental economies to producing economies has caused rapid and significant changes, including the influx of foreign (Arab and Asian) manual laborers, and spectacular urban development, particularly along the coast. This Atlas of the Gulf States contains more than 150 maps and graphs based on recent data. It offers a survey of the history and economic and urban development of the Gulf region. For Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, and Iran, this atlas offers detailed maps, plans and statistics for the relevant provinces as well as the most important cities. This Atlas is an updated translation from the French edition (2011), with a more extensive bibliography and an index.