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Series:

Edited by Annie Guerin and Trish McMenamin

In Belonging: Rethinking Inclusive Practices to Support Well-Being and Identity, issues related to inclusive education and belonging across a range of education contexts from early childhood to tertiary education are examined and matters related to participation, policy and theory, and identity and well-being are explored. Individual chapters, which are drawn from papers presented at The Inclusive Education Summit held at the University of Canterbury, 2016, canvass a variety of topics including pedagogy, sexuality, theory, policy and practice. These topics are explored from the authors’ varying perspectives as practitioners, academics and lay-persons and also from varying international perspectives including New Zealand, South Africa and Australia.

Contributors are: Keith Ballard, Henrietta Bollinger, Hera Cook, Michael Gafffney, Annie Guerin, Fiona Henderson, Leechin Heng, Kate McAnelly, Trish McMenamin, Be Pannell, Christine Rietveld, Marie Turner, Ben Whitburn, Julie White, and Melanie Wong.

Another Way

Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling

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Edited by Rebecca Clothey and Kai Heidemann

Drawing on a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives, the case studies compiled in Another Way: Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling offer a comparative look at how global processes of educational decentralization have both helped and hindered the development of community-based schools in local-level settings across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. On the one hand, the book shows how increased decentralization is often perceived as essential to assuring robust levels of democratization, community participation and social justice in education. On the other hand, it is also shown how processes of educational decentralization are often experienced in local communities as a mechanism of increased austerity, privatization and segregation.

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Edited by Peter Duffy, Christine Hatton and Richard Sallis

At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impacts of scholarship, the voices of research participants become secondary to impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may more authentically articulate the phenomena being studied. When external forces limit methodological practices, research innovation slows and homogenizes.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of elevating our field’s research practice and inquiry. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers to interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that take multiple forms (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).

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Edited by Michael Macaluso and Kati Macaluso

The canon, as much an ideology as it is a body of texts perceived to be intrinsic to the high school English classroom, has come under scrutiny for maintaining status quo narratives about whiteness, masculinity, heterosexuality, ability, and even those associated with American ideals of self-reliance, the good life, and the self-made man. Teaching practices around these texts may also reinforce harmful practices and ways of thinking, including those connected to notions of culture, literary merit, and methods of reading, teaching, and learning.

Teaching the Canon in 21st Century Classrooms offers innovative, critical ways of reading, thinking about, and teaching canonical texts in 21st century classrooms. Responding to the increasingly pluralized, digitized, global 21st century English classroom, chapter authors make explicit the ideologies of a canonical text of focus, while also elaborating a pedagogical approach that de-centers the canon, bridges past and present, applies critical theory, and celebrates the rich identities of 21st century readers. In using this book, teachers will be especially poised to take on the canon in their classroom and, thus, to open up their curricula to ideas, values, concerns, and narratives beyond those embedded in the canonical texts.

Fostering a Relational Pedagogy

Self-Study as Transformative Praxis

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

It has long been established that teaching and learning are autobiographical endeavours, so it follows that self-study is central to sound practice. As a framework, self-study allows researchers to use their experiences to examine self-in-practice with the aim of both personal and professional growth. By its very design, it makes transparent personal processes of inquiry by offering them up for public critique. This type of public inquiry of the personal happens in at least two ways: first, through the inclusion of trusted others who can provide different perspectives on our closely held discourses; and, second, through making our research publicly available so that others might learn from our inquiries. Self-study, then, requires openness to vulnerability as we continuously re/negotiate who we are as teachers. Approaching inquiry from this perspective has at its core deepened self-knowledge coupled with intent to transform praxis. This transformation is sought through integrated ways of being and teaching that support embodied wholeness of teachers and learners. Through critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches, this collection seeks to advance teacher self-study and, through it, transformative praxis.

Contributors are: Willow S. Allen, Charity Becker, Yue Bian, Abby Boehm-Turner, Diane Burt, Vy Dao, Lee C. Fisher, Teresa Anne Fowler, Deborah Graham, Cher Hill, Chinwe H. Ikpeze, David Jardine, Elizabeth Kenyon, Jodi Latremouille, Carl Leggo, Ellyn Lyle, Sepideh Mahani, Jennifer Markides, Sherry Martens, Kate McCabe, Laura Piersol, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Amanda C. Shopa, Timothy Sibbald, Sara K. Sterner, and Aaron Zimmerman.

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Edited by Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Morten Misfeldt, Robert Ramberg and Staffan Selander

We live in a time of educational transformations towards more 21st century pedagogies and learning. In the digital age children and young people need to learn critical thinking, creativity and innovation and the ability to solve complex problems and challenges. Traditional pedagogies are in crisis and many pupils experience school as both boring and irrelevant. As a response educators and researchers need to engage in transforming education through the invention of new designs in and for learning. This book explores how games can provide new ideas and new designs for future education. Computer games have become hugely popular and engaging, but as is apparent in this book, games are not magical solutions to making education more engaging, fun and relevant.

Games and Education explores new designs in and for learning and offer inspiration to teachers, technologists and researchers interested in changing educational practices. Based on contributions from Scandinavian researchers, the book highlights participatory approaches to research and practice by providing more realistic experiences and models of how games can facilitate learning in school.

Living a Motivated Life

A Memoir and Activities

Raymond J. Wlodkowski

What if, as psychologists and adult educators advocate, a person chose a life where his motivation for the work itself determined what he did? Living a Motivated Life: A Memoir and Activities follows the author through forty years, revealing how he selected vocational pursuits guided by his understanding of intrinsic motivation and transformative learning. As a compass for relevant decisions, these ideas gave energy and purpose to how he lived, and an instinct as sure as sight for the future.

Written with nuance, humor, and unpredictability, this story renders how he came to appreciate learning for the pleasure of learning. Facing similar challenges as those of today’s first generation college students, the memoir narrates his unexpected college enrollment, his friendship with an ancient history professor, and his triumphs and travails as teacher, psychologist, human relations specialist, psychotherapist, and adult educator.

This is the first memoir of someone who consciously chose to lead a professional life to experience flow on a daily basis. It is an important step in the integration and evolution of intrinsic motivation theory and transformative learning. But it reaches beyond this outcome, sharing how the author aspired to be better at what he valued and showing how he discovered and extended these ideas to others.

Exploring Pedagogic Frailty and Resilience

Case Studies of Academic Narrative

Edited by Ian M. Kinchin and Naomi E. Winstone

Exploring Pedagogic Frailty and Resilience presents the practical application of the frailty model to demonstrate how it may be used to support the professional development of university teachers. Case studies from colleagues representing a diverse variety of disciplines illustrate how the development of a reflective narrative can be initiated and framed through the use of concept map-mediated interviews. The emerging accounts share a common structure to facilitate comparison across academic disciplines.

Chapters are written by academic leaders – colleagues who are recognised as excellent teachers within their disciplines and whose voices will be acknowledged as offering authentic commentary on the current state of university teaching. These commentaries offer a unique resource for other academics who may be tempted to reflect on their teaching in a scholarly manner, or to university managers and academic developers who want to explore the detail that lies beneath broad surveys of teaching quality and investigate the factors that can either support the development of teaching or impede its progress.

This collection of narratives drawn from a single institution will resonate with the experiences of teachers in higher education more broadly through areas of common interest and regions of generalisability that can be explored to inform professional development of university teachers in other institutional and national contexts.

The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.

International Institutional Law

Sixth Revised Edition

Henry G. Schermers and Niels M. Blokker

This sixth, revised edition of International Institutional Law covers the most recent developments in the field. Although public international organizations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the African Union, ASEAN, the European Union, Mercosur, NATO and OPEC have broadly divergent objectives, powers, fields of activity and numbers of member states, they also share a wide variety of institutional characteristics. Rather than being a handbook for specific organizations, the book offers a comparative analysis of the institutional law of international organizations. It includes chapters on the rules and practices concerning membership, institutional structure, decision-making, financing, legal order, supervision and sanctions, legal status and external relations. The book’s theoretical framework and extensive use of case-studies is designed to appeal to both academics and practitioners.