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Series:

Edited by Matthew S. Gordon, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson and Michael Fishbein

The Works of Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī, a three volume set, contains a fully annotated translation of the extant writings of Abū al-ʿAbbās al-Yaʿqūbī, a Muslim imperial official and polymath of the third/ninth century, along with an introduction to these works and a biographical sketch of their author. The most important of the works are the History ( Ta’rikh) and his Geography ( Kitab al-buldan). It also contains a new translation of al-Yaʿqūbī’s political essay ( Mushakalat al-nas) and a set of fragmentary texts drawn from other Arabic medieval works. Al-Yaʿqūbī’s writings are among the earliest surviving Arabic-language works of the Islamic period, and thus offer an invaluable body of evidence on patterns of early Islamic history, social and economic organization, and cultural production. Contributors: Laila Asser, Paul Cobb, Lawrence I. Conrad, Elton Daniel, Fred Donner, Michael Fishbein, Matthew S. Gordon, Sidney H. Griffith, Wadad Kadi (al-Qāḍī), Lutz Richter-Bernberg, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson

Series:

Edited by Matthew S. Gordon, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson and Michael Fishbein

The Works of Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī, a three volume set, contains a fully annotated translation of the extant writings of Abū al-ʿAbbās al-Yaʿqūbī, a Muslim imperial official and polymath of the third/ninth century, along with an introduction to these works and a biographical sketch of their author. The most important of the works are the History ( Ta’rikh) and his Geography ( Kitab al-buldan). It also contains a new translation of al-Yaʿqūbī’s political essay ( Mushakalat al-nas) and a set of fragmentary texts drawn from other Arabic medieval works. Al-Yaʿqūbī’s writings are among the earliest surviving Arabic-language works of the Islamic period, and thus offer an invaluable body of evidence on patterns of early Islamic history, social and economic organization, and cultural production. Contributors: Laila Asser, Paul Cobb, Lawrence I. Conrad, Elton Daniel, Fred Donner, Michael Fishbein, Matthew S. Gordon, Sidney H. Griffith, Wadad Kadi (al-Qāḍī), Lutz Richter-Bernberg, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson

Series:

Edited by Matthew S. Gordon, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson and Michael Fishbein

The Works of Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī, a three volume set, contains a fully annotated translation of the extant writings of Abū al-ʿAbbās al-Yaʿqūbī, a Muslim imperial official and polymath of the third/ninth century, along with an introduction to these works and a biographical sketch of their author. The most important of the works are the History ( Ta’rikh) and his Geography ( Kitab al-buldan). It also contains a new translation of al-Yaʿqūbī’s political essay ( Mushakalat al-nas) and a set of fragmentary texts drawn from other Arabic medieval works. Al-Yaʿqūbī’s writings are among the earliest surviving Arabic-language works of the Islamic period, and thus offer an invaluable body of evidence on patterns of early Islamic history, social and economic organization, and cultural production. Contributors: Laila Asser, Paul Cobb, Lawrence I. Conrad, Elton Daniel, Fred Donner, Michael Fishbein, Matthew S. Gordon, Sidney H. Griffith, Wadad Kadi (al-Qāḍī), Lutz Richter-Bernberg, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson

Looking Back at al-Andalus

The Poetics of Loss and Nostalgia in Medieval Arabic and Hebrew Literature

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Alexander Elinson

Looking Back at al-Andalus focuses on Arabic and Hebrew Literature that expresses the loss of al-Andalus from multiple vantage points. In doing so, this book examines the definition of al-Andalus’ literary borders, the reconstruction of which navigates between traditional generic formulations and actual political, military and cultural challenges. By looking at a variety of genres, the book shows that literature aiming to recall and define al-Andalus expresses a series of symbolic literary objects more than a geographic and political entity fixed in a single time and place. Looking Back at al-Andalus offers a unique examination into the role of memory, language, and subjectivity in presenting a series of interpretations of what al-Andalus represented to different writers at different historical-cultural moments.

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Guido M. Berndt

Edited by Guido M. Berndt

Audun and the Polar Bear

Luck, Law, and Largesse in a Medieval Tale of Risky Business

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William I. Miller

Audun’s Story is the tale of an Icelandic farmhand who buys a polar bear in Greenland for no other reason than to give it to the Danish king, half a world away. It can justly be listed among the finest pieces of short fiction in world literature. Terse in the best saga style, it spins a story of complex competitive social action, revealing the cool wit and finely-calibrated reticence of its three main characters: Audun, Harald Hardradi, and King Svein. The tale should have much to engage legal and cultural historians, anthropologists, economists, philosophers, and students of literature. The story’s treatment of gift-exchange is worthy of the fine anthropological and historical writing on gift-exchange; its treatment of face-to-face interaction a match for Erving Goffman.

The Persecution of the Jews and Muslims of Portugal

King Manuel I and the End of Religious Tolerance (1496-7)

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François Soyer

In 1496-7, King Manuel I of Portugal forced the Jews of his kingdom to convert to Christianity and expelled all his Muslim subjects. Portugal was the first kingdom of the Iberian Peninsula to end definitively Christian-Jewish-Muslim coexistence, creating an exclusively Christian realm. Drawing upon narrative and documentary sources in Portuguese, Spanish and Hebrew, this book pieces together the developments that led to the events of 1496-7 and presents a detailed reconstruction of the persecution. It challenges widely held views concerning the impact of the arrival in Portugal of the Jews expelled from Castile in 1492, the diplomatic wrangling that led to the forced conversion of the Portuguese Jews in 1497 and the causes behind the expulsion of the Muslim minority.

Framing Iberia

Maqāmāt and Frametale Narratives in Medieval Spain

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David Wacks

Framing Iberia is a study of medieval Iberian culture observed through the lens of the frametale, a type of story collection cultivated by medieval Iberian authors in several languages. Its best known examples outside of Iberia are Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Boccaccio’s Decameron, and the Thousand and One Nights. In Framing Iberia the author relocates the Castilian classics El Conde Lucanor and El Libro de buen amor within a literary tradition that includes works in Arabic, Hebrew, Latin, and Romance. In doing so, he draws on current critical theory and cultural studies in reevaluating how the multicultural society of medieval Iberia is reflected in its narrative literature. Winner of the 2009 La corónica International Book Award for scholarship in Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

Also available in paperback ISBN 978 9004 20589 5

The Danish Resources c. 1000-1550

Growth and Recession

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Nils Hybel and Bjorn Poulsen

This pioneering work presents the first comprehensive economic history of medieval Denmark. It puts data produced by more than a century of historical research into a new context and includes a multitude of information based on primary research. The book abounds in knowledge of natural and human resources, rural life, urban industries, tax and commodity trade. Arguing that the development of the Danish resources from the eleventh to the middle of the fourteenth century cannot be viewed simply as a period of prosperity, and conversely that the Late Middle Ages were characterized as much by growth as by recession, the book places itself in an international historiographical controversy. The Danish Resources will become an indispensable standard work for students of Danish and north European medieval history.

Money, Markets and Trade in Late Medieval Europe

Essays in Honour of John H.A. Munro

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Edited by Lawrin Armstrong, Ivana Elbl and Martin Elbl

Assembled in honour of John H. A. Munro (University of Toronto), the volume groups nineteen original studies by a diversified panel of scholars. The essays explore late medieval market mechanisms and associated institutional, fiscal and monetary, organizational, decision-making, legal and ethical issues, as well as various aspects of production, consumption and market integration. The geographical scope stretches from North-Western and Central Europe to North and West Africa, and the individual contributions deal with a variety of local, regional, and long-distance markets and networks. The mix of approaches, cutting-edge archival research, and presentations of current projects addresses the interests of scholars in diverse fields, from economic to social and institutional history. The volume offers a full bibliography of John H. A. Munro’s works.