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The Realm of the Dead through the Voice of the Living
Author: Julia Hsieh
In Ancient Egyptian Letters to the Dead: the Realm of the Dead through the Voice of the Living Julia Hsieh investigates the beliefs and practices of communicating with the dead in ancient Egypt through close lexical semantic analysis of extant Letters. Hsieh shows how oral indicators, toponyms, and adverbs in these Letters signal a practice that was likely performed aloud in a tomb or necropolis, and how the senders of these Letters demonstrate a belief in the power and omniscience of their deceased relatives and enjoin them to fight malevolent entities and advocate on their behalf in the afterlife. These Letters reflect universals in beliefs and practices and how humankind, past and present, makes sense of existence beyond death.
Sources of Warfare Leadership in Ancient Egypt. Ancient Warfare Series Volume 4
The study of the ancient Egyptian military and warfare now encompasses the background court society in which the various eulogies drawn up for the glorification of the kings were composed. This study proceeds from a previous analysis of the leadership characteristics of the military pharaohs to their underlying war records to the literary compositions that the pharaohs had drawn up for their glorification. A study of these court-inspired accounts fits within the overarching new perspectives of royally directed and inspired ancient Egyptian literature. The historical background covers the New Kingdom pharaohs Kamose, Thutmose III, Ramesses II and III, with Merenptah, plus Pianchy. The concentration is primarily upon the narrative structures employed in each of these king’s monumental inscriptions.
A wide range of specialists provide a comprehensive overview of the reception of Pythagorean ideas in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, shedding new light especially on the understudied ‘Medieval Pythagoras’ of the Latin West. They also explore the survival of Pythagoreanism in the Arabic, Jewish, and Persian cultures, thus adopting a multicultural perspective. Their common concern is to detect the sources of this reception, and to follow their circulation in diverse linguistic areas. The reader can thus have a panoramic view of the major themes belonging to the Pythagorean heritage – number philosophy and the sciences of the quadrivium; ethics and way of life; theology, metaphysics and the soul – until the Early Modern times.
Saint Antony of Egypt (c. 251–356), often called “the father of monasticism,” has numerous representations: the Antony of the Life of Antony and the Letters, but also the Antony of around 120 sayings or apophthegmata. This volume presents fresh English translations of the Greek and Coptic sayings, as well as the first English translation of the Copto-Arabic sayings that are based on unpublished manuscripts. The volume thus opens the door to a richer image of Saint Antony’s many identities across various languages and traditions.
Author: Louise Quillien
Textiles were one of the most celebrated products of Near-Eastern craft in Antiquity. In Histoire des Textiles en Babylonie, 626–484 av. J.-C., Louise Quillien offers an analysis of textile manufacturing, exchanges and uses in Babylonian society. In a context where archaeological textile remains are rare, cuneiform texts provide rich information on this craft. The book demonstrates that through the study of objects, it is possible to highlight a whole section of the economy, culture, religion and social customs of an ancient society, and proposes to immerse the reader in the daily life of the inhabitants of Mesopotamia.
The IOS Annual Volume 21: “Carrying a Torch to Distant Mountains”, brings forth cutting-edge studies devoted to a wide array of fields and disciplines of the Middle East. The three sections—the Ancient Near East, Semitic Languages and Linguistics, and Arabic Language and Literature—include sixteen articles. In the Ancient Near East section are studies devoted to Babylonian literature (Gabbay and Wasserman; Ayali-Darshan), history (Cohen and Torrecilla), and language (Zadok). The Semitic Languages and Linguistics section contains discussions about comparative Semitics—Egyptian and Modern South Arabic (Borg; Cerqueglini), Aramaic dialects (Khan; Stadel), Palestinian Arabic (Arnold; Procházka), and Tigre and Ethiosemitic languages (Voigt). The final section of Arabic Language and Literature is devoted to ʿArabiyya and its grammarians (Dror, Versteegh, Sheyhatovitch, Kasher, and Sadan).