Pirro Ligorio’s Worlds

Antiquarianism, Classical Erudition and the Visual Arts in the Late Renaissance

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Edited by Fernando Loffredo and Ginette Vagenheim

Pirro Ligorio’s Worlds brings renowned Ligorio specialists into conversation with emerging young scholars, on various aspects of the artistic, antiquarian and intellectual production of one of the most fascinating and learned antiquaries in the prestigious entourage of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese. The book takes a more nuanced approach to the complex topic of Ligorio’s ‘forgeries’, investigating them in relation to previously neglected aspects of his life and work.

Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Collection of Mediterranean Antiquities, Vol. 3, The Metal Objects and the Gems

Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, La collection des antiquités, Vol. 3, Les objets en métal et les gemmes

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Edited by Beaudoin Caron and John M. Fossey

This is the third out of eight projected volumes making available to the public the contents in the collection of Greek and Roman Antiquities in one of Canada’s most prestigious museums. Here are presented a variety of metal objects (mostly bronze figurines, medical instruments, brooches, weaponry and a lead sarcophagus), the small collection of jewelry and the ancient gems and seal stones (mainly Roman) some still set in rings. Ce volume est le troisième de la série de huit volumes projetés qui vise à publier la collection des antiquités grecques et romaines d’un des grands musées canadiens. Nous présentons ici des objets métalliques très variés (surtout des statuettes de bronze, des instruments médicaux, des épingles, des armes et un sarcophage de plomb), un petit nombre de bijoux et de gemmes anciennes (surtout romaines) certaines encore serties dans une bague.

Byzantium and the Avars, 6th-9th Century AD

Political, Diplomatic and Cultural Relations

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Georgios Kardaras

In this book, Georgios Kardaras offers a global view of the contacts between the Byzantine Empire and the Avar Khaganate, emphasizing the reconstruction of these contacts after 626 (when, in contrast to archaeological evidence, written sources are very few) and the definition of the possible channels of communication between the two powers. The author scrutinizes the political and diplomatic framework, and critically examines issues such as mutual influence on material culture and on warfare, reaching the conclusion that significant contact between Byzantium and the Avars can be proved up until 775.

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Mirosław Rudnicki

The The Olsztyn Group in the Early Medieval Archaeology of the Baltic Region: The Cemetry at Leleszki deals with a much neglected problem of the archaeology of the early Middle Ages. Between the 5th and the 7th century, the region of the Mazurian Lakes in northeastern Poland witnessed the rise of communities engaged in long-distant contacts with both Western and Eastern Europe. Known as the Olsztyn Group, the archaeological remains of those communities have revealed a remarkable wealth and diversity, which has attracted scholarly attention for more than 130 years. Besides offering a survey of the current state of research on the Olsztyn Group, Mirosław Rudnicki introduces the monographic study of the Leleszki cemetery (district of Szczytno, Poland) as one of the most representative sites. The prosperity and long-distance contact revealed by the examination of this cemetery shows that the West Baltic tribes had considerable influence in early medieval Europe, much more than scholars had been ready to admit until now.

Volubilis après Rome

Les fouilles UCL/INSAP, 2000-2005

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Edited by Elizabeth Fentress and Hassan Limane

Le site archéologique le plus visité au Maroc, Volubilis est connu depuis longtemps pour ses mosaïques spectaculaires. Ce livre traite de ce qui est arrivé à la ville après le retrait de l'administration romaine à la fin du troisième siècle. Les fouilles publiées ici montrent comment la ville a continué à survivre jusqu'au cinquième siècle, avec des maisons d'élite commandant encore des mosaïques élégantes, et comment cette occupation a pris fin dans un séisme brutal. La ville renaît au sixième siècle avec de nouveaux occupants, la tribu berbère des Awraba. Au VIIIe siècle, il devint le siège de l'homme qui unit la plus grande partie du Maroc à la tête de l'Awraba, Idris I, descendant du prophète Mahomet.

The most-visited archaeological site in Morocco, Volubilis has long been known for its spectacular mosaics. Instead, this book deals with what happened to the town after the Roman administration was withdrawn at the end of the third century. The excavations published here show how the town continued to survive into the fifth century, with élite houses still commissioning elegant and witty mosaics, and how this occupation came to an end in a brutal earthquake. The town revived in the sixth century with new occupants, the Berber Awraba tribe. In the eighth century, it became the headquarters of the man who united most of Morocco at the head of the Awraba, Idris I, a descendant of the prophet Mohammed.

Contributeurs/Contributors: Ali Aït Kaci, Victoria Amoros-Ruiz, Mustafa Atki, Amira K. Bennison, Helen Dawson, Fatima-Zohra El-Harrif, Hafsa El Hassani, Abdallah Fili, Dorian Fuller, Guy Hunt, Anthony King, Tarik Moujoud, Gaetano Palumbo, Ruth Pelling, Susan Walker, Mark Wilson Jones.

Edited by Andrea Manzo, Chiara Zazzaro and Diana Joyce De Falco

This book contains a selection of papers presented at the Red Sea VII conference titled “The Red Sea and the Gulf: Two Maritime Alternative Routes in the Development of Global Economy, from Late Prehistory to Modern Times”. The Red Sea and the Gulf are similar geographically and environmentally, and complementary to each other, as well as being competitors in their economic and cultural interactions with the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. The chapters of the volume are grouped in three sections, corresponding to the various historical periods. Each chapter of the book offers the reader the opportunity to travel across the regions of the Red Sea and the Gulf, and from the Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean from prehistory to the contemporary era.

With contributions by Ahmed Hussein Abdelrahman, Serena Autiero, Mahmoud S. Bashir, Kathryn A. Bard, Alemsege, Beldados, Ioana A. Dumitru, Serena Esposito, Rodolfo Fattovich, Luigi Gallo, Michal Gawlikowski, Caterina Giostra, Sunil Gupta, Michael Harrower, Martin Hense, Linda Huli, Sarah Japp, Serena Massa, Ralph K. Pedersen, Jacke S. Phillips, Patrice Pomey, Joanna K. Rądkowska, Mike Schnelle, Lucy Semaan, Steven E. Sidebotham, Shadia Taha, Husna Taha Elatta, Joanna Then-Obłuska and Iwona Zych

Two Thousand Years in Dendi, Northern Benin

Archaeology, History and Memory

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Edited by Anne Haour

In Two Thousand Years in Dendi, Northern Benin an international team examines a little-known part of the Niger River valley, West Africa, over the longue durée. This area, known as Dendi, has often been portrayed as the crossroads of major West African medieval empires but this understanding has been based on a small number of very patchy historical sources. Working from the ground up, from the archaeological sites, standing remains, oral traditions and craft industries of Dendi, Haour and her team offer the first in-depth account of the area.

Contributors are: Paul Adderley, Mardjoua Barpougouni, Victor Brunfaut, Louis Champion, Annalisa Christie, Barbara Eichhorn, Anne Filippini, Dorian Fuller, Olivier Gosselain, David Kay, Nadia Khalaf, Nestor Labiyi, Raoul Laibi, Richard Lee, Veerle Linseele, Alexandre Livingstone Smith, Carlos Magnavita, Sonja Magnavita, Didier N'Dah, Nicolas Nikis, Sam Nixon, Franck N’Po Takpara, Jean-François Pinet, Ronika Power, Caroline Robion-Brunner, Lucie Smolderen, Abubakar Sule Sani, Romuald Tchibozo, Jennifer Wexler, Wim Wouters.

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Edited by Danijel Dzino, Ante Milošević and Trpimir Vedriš

The collection Migration, Integration and Connectivity on the Southeastern Frontier of the Carolingian Empire offers insights into the Carolingian southeastern frontier-zone from historical, art-historical and archaeological perspectives.
Chapters in this volume discuss the significance of the early medieval period for scholarly and public discourses in the Western Balkans and Central Europe, and the transfer of knowledge between local scholarship and macro-narratives of Mediterranean and Western history. Other essays explore the ways local communities around the Adriatic (Istria, Dalmatia, Dalmatian hinterland, southern Pannonia) established and maintained social networks and integrated foreign cultural templates into their existing cultural habitus.
Contributors are Mladen Ančić, Ivan Basić, Goran Bilogrivić, Neven Budak, Florin Curta, Danijel Dzino, Krešimir Filipec, Richard Hodges, Nikola Jakšić, Miljenko Jurković, Ante Milošević, Marko Petrak, Peter Štih, Trpimir Vedriš.

Artillery in the Era of the Crusades

Siege Warfare and the Development of Trebuchet Technology

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Michael S. Fulton

Artillery in the Era of the Crusades provides a detailed examination of the use of mechanical artillery in the Levant through the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Rather than focus on a selection of sensational anecdotes, Michael S. Fulton explores the full scope of the available literary and archaeological evidence, reinterpreting the development of trebuchet technology and the ways in which it was used during this period. Among the arguments put forward, Fulton challenges the popular perception that the invention of the counterweight trebuchet was responsible for the dramatic transformation in the design of fortifications around the start of the thirteenth century.

Ambrogio Leone's De Nola, Venice 1514

Humanism and Antiquarian Culture in Renaissance Southern Italy

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Edited by Bianca de Divitiis, Fulvio Lenzo and Lorenzo Miletti

This volume offers the first comprehensive study of the De Nola (Venice 1514), a hitherto underappreciated Latin text written by the Nolan humanist and physician Ambrogio Leone. Furnished with four pioneering engravings made with the help of the Venetian artist Girolamo Mocetto, the De Nola is an impressively rich and multifaceted text, which contains an antiquarian (and celebratory) study of the city of Nola in the Kingdom of Naples. By describing antiquities, inscriptions, and buildings, as well as social and religious phenomena, the De Nola offers a precious window into a southern Italian Renaissance city, and constitutes a refined example of sixteenth-century antiquarianism. The work is analysed in a multidisciplinary approach, encompassing art and architectural history, antiquarianism, literature, social history, and anthropology.