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Designing Globally Networked Learning Environments

Visionary Partnerships, Policies, and Pedagogies

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Edited by Doreen Starke-Meyerring and Melanie Wilson

Faculty, administrators, and others in higher education face growing pressures to position their institutions, programs, and courses in “global markets” and to prepare students for global work and citizenship. These pressures raise urgent questions: What might higher education look like in a globally networked world? Do traditional industrial models of learning suffice, or what new visions for learning are emerging? What does it take to implement and maintain these visions?
To address these questions, Designing Globally Networked Learning Environments brings together 25 educators from four continents, who share their richly diverse visions for teaching and learning in a globally networked world. What unites these visions is that they break with traditional models of repackaging traditional institutionally bounded courses for online delivery in global markets. Instead, these educators build robust partnerships to design globally networked learning environments that connect students with peers, instructors, and communities across traditional institutional, national, and other boundaries to facilitate the kind of cross-boundary knowledge making that students as professionals and citizens will need to participate in the shaping of an emerging global order and to address the most pressing global problems we face.
The book offers these visions as opportunities for faculty, program directors, administrators, international program experts, instructional designers, faculty development experts, and others in higher education to work together to deliberate, develop, and shape inspiring visions for globally networked learning and to become active participants in the globalization of higher education.

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Edited by Kirsi Tirri

Nowadays, schools face the challenge of creating pedagogical environments that are sensitive to numerous individual backgrounds in order to support students’social and academic success. Urban schools are communities with rich possibilities to learn how to think, feel and act morally. In this task, principals, teachers, parents and students of the schools each have their own voice. All these voices have to be heard in order to build communities with moral sensibilities. This book brings together recent work by international researchers from nine countries in the fields of moral development and citizenship education. The book consists of twelve chapters and it is divided into three parts. While the first part deals with the voices of urban school educators, the second part contains chapters with the focus on students. The third part is about curriculum, programs and practices in schools that contribute to the education of moral sensibilities in the school communities. This book can be used as a textbook in moral and citizenship education or as an updated research report on international research on moral sensibilities.

Environmental Education

Identity, Politics and Citizenship

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Edited by Edgar González-Gaudiano and Michael A. Peters

In Environmental Education: Identity, Politics and Citizenship the editors endeavor to present views of environmental educators that focus on issues of identity and subjectivity, and how 'narrated lives’ relate to questions of learning, education, politics, justice, and citizenship. What is distinctive about this collection is that it highlights the views of Latin American scholars alongside those of scholars from Spain, Canada, New Zealand, Taiwan, South Africa, Australia, and U. S. The result is a philosophically nuanced reading of the complexities of environmental education that begins to reshape the landscape in terms of ethics, ontology, epistemology, and politics. The collection bears the stamp of the location of its contributors and strongly reflects an activist, qualitative, and ethnographic orientation that emphasizes the ground for action, the identity of environmental actors, and the contribution that education in all its forms can make to sustainability and the cause of the environment. At the same time, contributors go beyond simple slogans and ideologies to question the accepted truths of this rapidly emerging field.
Cover picture: Edgar González-Gaudiano: Siem Reap, Cambodia, December 2007.

Getting Involved

Global Citizenship Development and Sources of Moral Values

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Edited by Fritz K. Oser and Wiel Veugelers

Getting involved' in society means becoming a human person by doing something for others and thus being connected to mankind and society. Youngsters who get involved, give meaning to life and develop a feeling of agency. But ‘getting involved’ is not easy. Getting involved’ is necessary for living together, creating democracy and sustainability of a global world. The paradox is that in a modern, multicultural society ‘getting involved’ is even more important than in a traditional, more monocultural society.
‘Getting involved’ relates to various scientific orientations. Political, sociological, psychological and pedagogical questions are at issue, and all of these will be consulted in this volume. The main perspective however remains the issue of identity development relating to ‘getting involved’, and will therefore be psychological.
This book gives a broad overview of current research in the field of moral development and citizenship. It shows the diversity of concepts, research methodologies, and educational practices. The book also shows the influence of local social, cultural and political contexts.
The book can help researchers, teacher educators, politicians and practitioners in finding new and better ways of supporting youngsters in their moral and civic identity development.

Integrated Intelligence

Classical and Contemporary Depictions of Mind and Intelligence and their Educational Implications

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Marcus Anthony

Marcus Anthony examines theories of intelligence and consciousness, and the way in which they represent (or exclude) intuitive, spiritual and mystical experience. His argument identifies the way narrowly defined “rational” definitions of mind have come to dominate and restrict contemporary discourses in science and education. He develops the theory of integrated intelligence, an expanded model which incorporates the non-rational elements of human intelligence long missing in mainstream western discourses. Anthony indicates how and why they should be incorporated into modern education systems.

Leaders in Philosophy of Education

Intellectual Self-Portraits

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Edited by Leonard J. Waks

Since the 1960s we have witnessed the development of philosophy of education as a vital intellectual field. Beginning with the work of Israel Scheffler at Harvard, and spreading rapidly to the United Kingdom under the influence of R.S. Peters and Paul Hirst at the London Institute of Education, analytical philosophers of education worked toward a new understanding of such central educational concepts as teaching, learning, explanation, curriculum, aims and objectives, freedom and authority, equality and liberal education. They also examined theoretical issues in educational research and critiqued reigning ideas in educational psychology.
By the 1970s interest in the analysis of educational concepts and research methods had waned. A new generation of philosophers of education turned to new issues, including: intellectual and practical virtues, individual well-being, the education of girls and women, the ethics of care, creative thinking and imagination, multicultural education, globalization and many others.
In this book, 24 leading philosophers of education since 1970 who remain influential today present the fascinating stories of their lives and important new contributions to the field. They trace their early experiences, initial encounters with philosophy and philosophy of education, creative directions in their work, mature ideas, and perceptions of future directions for the field. Each chapter contains a list of works chosen by the authors as their personal favorites.

Military Pedagogies

And why they matter

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Edited by Tone Kvernbekk, Harold Simpson and Michael A. Peters

Armed conflict is an inescapable reality in the world today. Military institutions and their activities both in peacetime and in wartime are a fact of life in western democracies and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Preparation of the men and women who are sent by their governments to fight or keep the peace is a life and death matter for those charged with the education and training of the Armed Forces. The development of military pedagogies is an attempt to address and reconcile the principles of education and military necessity. The enduring requirement is for an operationally effective yet ethically acceptable military organisation that is accountable to the society that it serves and to global ethical standards. This book provides new perspectives on the role of education in the Armed Forces of a democratic state. The wide ranging perspectives offered reflect the contributors who are from diverse professional backgrounds including serving military officers, academics and educators employed in military academies as well as social scientists. This book is aimed at those interested in policy and practice although it also provides more theoretical analyses that will interest academics and the general public.

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Peter Roberts and Michael A. Peters

This book addresses key developments in higher education and research policy over the past decade. The authors pay particular attention to policy changes in New Zealand following the formation of a Labour-Alliance coalition government in 1999. From 1999 to 2008, a version of ‘Third Way’ politics has been applied in the New Zealand context. A key government goal has been to advance New Zealand as a ‘knowledge society and economy’, and education at the tertiary level has been seen as crucial in achieving this. Neoliberalism, Higher Education and Research considers the relationship between neoliberalism and the Third Way, discusses international trends in knowledge capitalism, examines performance-based research funding, critiques the rhetoric of ‘quality’ and ‘relevance’ in recent higher education policy, and assesses possibilities for critical citizenship and intellectual life in the 21st century. Much can be learned from the New Zealand experience in reflecting on policy developments in other countries, and this book will be of interest to all who ponder the future of knowledge and education in a globalised world.

Nomadic Education

Variations on a Theme by Deleuze and Guattari

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Edited by Inna Semetsky

“This comprehensive and thoughtful volume is the first book to investigate, assess and apply a philosophy of education drawn from the great French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. It contains powerful and beautiful essays by some of the most influential Deleuze and Guattari commentators (the chapters by Bogue, Colebrook, May and Semetsky, and Genosko are particularly rewarding). The book provides very useful situations within the philosophy of education and some interesting experimental developments of Deleuze’s work, notably in terms of new technologies and original methods. This is then an indispensable work on Deleuze and education. It covers the historical background and begins shaping debates for future research in this exciting and growing area.” —Professor James Williams, Professor of European Philosophy, School of Humanities, University of Dundee, author of Gilles Deleuze’s Difference and Repetition: A Critical Introduction and Guide and The Transversal Thought of Gilles Deleuze: Encounters and Influences

“Deleuze always said that education was an erotic, voluptuous experience, perhaps the most important experience we can have. This collection captures that excitement and challenges what we think about how Deleuze should be taught and just as importantly what he taught.” —Ian Buchanan, Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory, Cardiff University, author of Deleuze and Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus and founding editor of Deleuze Studies

“Here are thirteen encounters with Deleuze’s work that not only testify of the creativity and newness of Deleuze’s own writing but that, by taking these ideas into the field of education, raise new questions, signal new problems, and provide genuinely new ways of educational thinking and being. A rich source of inspiration for anyone who believes that education should not be about the reproduction of what already exists but should be committed to what is to become.” —Gert Biesta, University of Stirling, author of Beyond Learning: Democratic Education for a Human Future; co-editor of Derrida & Education

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Edited by Michael A. Peters and Rodrigo G. Britez

The essays in this edited collection reflect on the nature of open education resources, where the question on openness for education emerges. What is remarkable today are the ways that teachers and institutions now begin to form part of the processes of global exchange and production of a network of global educational commons. The question about the significance of this development, their limits and the consequences for practitioners and institutions from the perspective of teachers is extremely complex. For example, the policy agenda of institutions, states, and international organizations related to the regulation of new technologies facilitates the existence and viability of those resources. This has consequences for the ways that those resources are used and produced by educators. Contributors to this collection, each on their own way, argue that Open Education involves a commitment to openness and is therefore inevitably a political and social project. This books ends with a challenge for those engaged in exploring the potential impacts and possibilities of open education initiatives. The open education paradigm and its consequences for educators and learners speak of an uneven geography where the access to technological infrastructure does not necessarily imply freedom or openness. In those instances, openness in education related to open education initiatives requires an engagement in research about the ways in which policy, cultural, digital and educational environments facilitate a political commitment to open systems of knowledge production and distribution. One thing is sure, as the essays in this book demonstrated so clearly, these developments promise an implicit paradigm of openness and democratic collaboration in education that remains to be realized.