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Leaders in Curriculum Studies

Intellectual Self-Portraits

Series:

Leonard J. Waks and Edmund C. Short

In the 1950s and 1960s school teaching became a university-based profession, and scholars and policy leaders looked to the humanities and social sciences in building an appropriate knowledge base. By the mid-1960s there was talk about a “new” philosophy, history, and sociology of education. Curriculum thinkers such as Joseph Schwab, Dwayne Heubner and Paul Hirst initiated new intellectual projects to supplement applied work in curriculum.
By the 1970s the field was in the process of re-conceptualization, as a new generation of scholars provided deep critical insights into the social, political and cultural dynamics of school experience and templates for renewal of curriculum research and practice.
In this book, 18 leading curriculum scholars since 1970 who remain influential today present the fascinating stories of their lives and important new contributions to the field. They trace their early experiences in teaching and curriculum development, creative directions in their work, mature ideas and perceptions of future directions for the field. Each chapter contains a list of works chosen by the authors as their personal favorites.

Teacher Assemblage

International Perspectives

P. Taylor Webb

Teacher Assemblage is a groundbreaking report in the tradition of fieldwork in philosophy, using Michel Foucault’s and Gilles Deleuze’s ideas to better understand how accountability policy affected teachers. The case study examines different vectors of power and demonstrates how teachers interacted with each other, and interacted with their immediate policy environments. This unique book provides readers with grounded insights into Foucault’s and Deleuze’s ideas by paying close attention to the macro- and micro- political worlds of schools as teachers struggle with new forms of performance accountability. The book illustrates ideas of power, politics, and policy with a unique use of surrealist art to illustrate the philosophical ideas at play in the case study. The book will have a wide appeal to teachers, teacher educators, educational researchers, policy and curriculum scholars, art aficionados, and those interested in the thoughts of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze.

Series:

Edited by Kirsi Tirri

Nowadays, schools face the challenge of creating pedagogical environments that are sensitive to numerous individual backgrounds in order to support students’social and academic success. Urban schools are communities with rich possibilities to learn how to think, feel and act morally. In this task, principals, teachers, parents and students of the schools each have their own voice. All these voices have to be heard in order to build communities with moral sensibilities. This book brings together recent work by international researchers from nine countries in the fields of moral development and citizenship education. The book consists of twelve chapters and it is divided into three parts. While the first part deals with the voices of urban school educators, the second part contains chapters with the focus on students. The third part is about curriculum, programs and practices in schools that contribute to the education of moral sensibilities in the school communities. This book can be used as a textbook in moral and citizenship education or as an updated research report on international research on moral sensibilities.

Environmental Education

Identity, Politics and Citizenship

Series:

Edited by Edgar González-Gaudiano and Michael A. Peters

In Environmental Education: Identity, Politics and Citizenship the editors endeavor to present views of environmental educators that focus on issues of identity and subjectivity, and how 'narrated lives’ relate to questions of learning, education, politics, justice, and citizenship. What is distinctive about this collection is that it highlights the views of Latin American scholars alongside those of scholars from Spain, Canada, New Zealand, Taiwan, South Africa, Australia, and U. S. The result is a philosophically nuanced reading of the complexities of environmental education that begins to reshape the landscape in terms of ethics, ontology, epistemology, and politics. The collection bears the stamp of the location of its contributors and strongly reflects an activist, qualitative, and ethnographic orientation that emphasizes the ground for action, the identity of environmental actors, and the contribution that education in all its forms can make to sustainability and the cause of the environment. At the same time, contributors go beyond simple slogans and ideologies to question the accepted truths of this rapidly emerging field.
Cover picture: Edgar González-Gaudiano: Siem Reap, Cambodia, December 2007.

Getting Involved

Global Citizenship Development and Sources of Moral Values

Series:

Edited by Fritz K. Oser and Wiel Veugelers

Getting involved' in society means becoming a human person by doing something for others and thus being connected to mankind and society. Youngsters who get involved, give meaning to life and develop a feeling of agency. But ‘getting involved’ is not easy. Getting involved’ is necessary for living together, creating democracy and sustainability of a global world. The paradox is that in a modern, multicultural society ‘getting involved’ is even more important than in a traditional, more monocultural society.
‘Getting involved’ relates to various scientific orientations. Political, sociological, psychological and pedagogical questions are at issue, and all of these will be consulted in this volume. The main perspective however remains the issue of identity development relating to ‘getting involved’, and will therefore be psychological.
This book gives a broad overview of current research in the field of moral development and citizenship. It shows the diversity of concepts, research methodologies, and educational practices. The book also shows the influence of local social, cultural and political contexts.
The book can help researchers, teacher educators, politicians and practitioners in finding new and better ways of supporting youngsters in their moral and civic identity development.

Leaders in Philosophy of Education

Intellectual Self-Portraits

Series:

Edited by Leonard J. Waks

Since the 1960s we have witnessed the development of philosophy of education as a vital intellectual field. Beginning with the work of Israel Scheffler at Harvard, and spreading rapidly to the United Kingdom under the influence of R.S. Peters and Paul Hirst at the London Institute of Education, analytical philosophers of education worked toward a new understanding of such central educational concepts as teaching, learning, explanation, curriculum, aims and objectives, freedom and authority, equality and liberal education. They also examined theoretical issues in educational research and critiqued reigning ideas in educational psychology.
By the 1970s interest in the analysis of educational concepts and research methods had waned. A new generation of philosophers of education turned to new issues, including: intellectual and practical virtues, individual well-being, the education of girls and women, the ethics of care, creative thinking and imagination, multicultural education, globalization and many others.
In this book, 24 leading philosophers of education since 1970 who remain influential today present the fascinating stories of their lives and important new contributions to the field. They trace their early experiences, initial encounters with philosophy and philosophy of education, creative directions in their work, mature ideas, and perceptions of future directions for the field. Each chapter contains a list of works chosen by the authors as their personal favorites.

The Richness of Art Education

Reflective Thinking Through Collaborative Inquiry

Series:

Howard Cannatella

This book is intended for anyone interested in knowing more about arts education. It makes a daring contribution to the subject in a clear, pragmatic, committed and ambitious way. The book discusses thoroughly the theory and practice of arts education and what it means to be a teacher of art. It is a powerful and inspiring account of the challenges of teaching in the arts that will appeal to anyone in the teaching profession. With clarity and engagement, The Richness of Arts Education ddresses what it means to be a teacher in the arts. Familiarity and knowledge of teaching is checked by the constant relevant examples that the book critically explores. The book rethinks some of the real ground of teaching in the arts and encourages a deeper understanding of them. Primary and secondary teachers, college and university teachers and policy makers will find this book formidable. It is a book for today and tomorrow.
Howard Canatella’s The Richness of Arts Education provides a deep philosophical engagement with the arts and art education. And if that were not enough, it also provides a sustained discussion of the ways in which art education enriches our philosophical understanding of the arts specifically, education certainly, but also some key issues within philosophy itself. In other words, Canatella adequately demonstrates the riches that art education entails. While the key figures he engages with do not encompass the entire range of possible philosophical perspectives that could be brought to bear on the field of art education—an impossible task in any case—he engages each figure deeply. The scholarly literature in each section is thoroughly explored to highlight the thesis that holds the entire project together—the deeply textured quality of art education and the many benefits that we can derive thereof. This should be a valuable book to art teachers no doubt, but to educators and philosophers too.

Social Justice Education for Teachers

Paulo Freire and the Possible Dream

Edited by Carlos Alberto Torres and Pedro Noguera

Social Justice Education for Teachers: Paulo Freire and the Possible Dream is a book that will help teachers in their commitment to and praxis of an education for social justice. The book traces the reception of Freire’s ideas in the USA, Canada, Latin America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia and provides some glimpses of topical yet seminal interventions in the philosophy of education, including studies of the relationships between Freire and Rousseau, Freire and Dewey, or Freire and Gramsci. In addition it addresses how Freire’s ideas could be implemented in urban education, both in the industrialized and developing world, and how the debates about globalization today need to addressed also with the politics of liberation as a possible dream. Three of the authors, Moacir Gadotti, Carlos Alberto Torres, and José Eustaquio Romão with the help of Paulo Freire, created the first Paulo Freire Institute in São Paulo, Brazil in 1991, and worked very closely with Freire for more than two decades, while the remaining scholars/activist are noted Freirean scholars and urban educators devoting their research, teaching and political activism to promote tools of conviviality and models of policy that will make this a better world, a less ugly world, a world, in the words of Freire, where it will be easier to love.

Edited by Ruud van der Veen, Danny Wildemeersch, Janet Youngblood and Victoria Marsick

"Education and learning for democracy take place in a wide variety of contexts worldwide. Traditionally, children are prepared to become responsible citizens in families and schools. In non-formal settings and in their lived experience, adults engage in democratic practices. Some people are active members of political parties or trade unions; others take responsibilities in associations of civil society. Still others engage in participatory practices in labor organizations. New practices and understandings of learning for democracy are often attempts to deal with transformations taking place in the contexts in which people operate. They experience the limits of representative democracy and try to enrich it with practices of direct democracy, thereby creating new learning opportunities for the participants involved. Theoretical aspects of learning in democratic practices are explored in Part I of this book. Part II describes examples of learning in political and social action, while Part III describes examples of democratic practices on the shop floor. Together the book delivers an introduction to the field of education for democracy for both social scientists and practitioners interested in ways to support the learning of democracy. Because of it comprehensive character, the book can be used also as a textbook in graduate and post-graduate courses."