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Series:

Nikolas Gisborne

In Ten Lectures on Event Structure in a Network Theory of Language, Nikolas Gisborne explores verb meaning. He discusses theories of events and how a network model of language-in-the-mind should be theorized; what the lexicon is; how to probe word meaning; evidence for structure in word meaning; polysemy; the lexical semantics of causation; a type hierarchy of events; and event types cross-linguistically. He also looks at the relationship between different classes of events or event types and aktionsarten; transitivity alternations and argument linking. Gisborne argues that the social and cognitive embedding of language, requires a view of linguistic structure as a network where even the analysis of verb meaning can require an understanding of the role of speaker and hearer.

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Edited by Anila Zainub

Decolonization and Anti-colonial Praxis presents research on contemporary forms of decolonization and anti-colonialism in practice. It pertains to the ways in which individuals, groups, and communities engage with the logic of epistemic colonial power within areas of citizenship, migration, education, Indigeneity, language, land struggle, and social work. The contributions in this edited volume empirically document the conceptual and bodily engagement of racialized and violated individuals and communities as they use anti-colonial principles to disrupt criminalizing institutional discourses and policies within various global imperial contexts.

The terms ‘Decolonization’ and ‘Anti-colonialism’ are used in diverse and interdisciplinary academic perspectives. They are researched upon and elaborated in necessary ways in the theoretical literature, however, it is rare to see these principles employed in applied forms. Decolonization and Anti-colonial Praxis provides a much needed contemporary and representative reclamation of these concepts from the standpoint of racialized communities. It explores the frameworks and methods rooted in their indigeneity, cultural history and memories to imagine a new future. The research findings and methodological tools presented in this book will be of interdisciplinary interest to teachers, graduate students and researchers.

Contributors are: Harriet Akanmori, Ayah Al Oballi, Sevgi Arslan, Jacqueline Benn-John, Lucy El-Sherif, Danielle Freitas, Pablo Isla Monsalve, Dionisio Nyaga, Hoda Samater, Rose Ann Torres, Umar Umangay, and Anila Zainub. 

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Edited by Jody L. McBrien

Since 2014, the international community has felt overwhelmed by refugees and asylum seekers searching for opportunities in which to rebuild their lives. Indeed, large numbers can result in turmoil and concern in resettlement countries and with national citizens. A climate of fear can result, especially if perpetuated by politicians and media that suggest negative effects resulting from immigration.

Caught in the crossfire of social and political disagreements about migration are children, most of whom are not included in decisions to leave their homelands. This edited book examines their academic challenges from the perspective of the six English-speaking refugee resettlement countries. Our hope is not only to compare challenges, but also to describe successes by which teachers and policymakers can consider new approaches to help refugee and asylum-seeking children.

Educational Policies and Practices of English-Speaking Refugee Resettlement Countries offers perspectives from established and new scholars examining educational situations for refugees and asylum seekers. The top three resettlement countries are the United States, Canada, and Australia. For its size, New Zealand is also proportionately a country of high resettlement. New to resettlement are the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Thus, this collection includes wisdom from countries that began resettlement during World War Two as well as newcomers to the process. In 2018, UNHCR numbers of displaced people reached a record high of 68.5 million. Policymakers, teachers, social service providers, and the general public need to understand ways to help resettled refugees become productive members in their new countries of residence.

Contributors are: Samantha Arnold, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Melanie Baak, Sally Baker, Zhiyan Basharati, Briana Byers, Merike Darmody, Lucia Dore, Ain A. Grooms, Maria Hayward, Asher Hirsch, Amanda Hiorth, Caroline Lenette, Leslie Ann Locke, Duhita Mahatmya, Jody L. McBrien, Rory Mc Daid, Helen Murphy, Tara Ross, Jan Stewart, and Elizabeth P. Tonogbanua.

Improving Early Literacy Outcomes

Curriculum, Teaching, and Assessment

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Edited by Nic Spaull and John Comings

Learning to read and write for meaning and pleasure are arguably the two most important competences that children acquire in primary school. Yet, in 2019 more than one half of children worldwide do not reach this first rung on the literacy ladder. Improving Early Literacy Outcomes aims to address this head-on, by foregrounding the work of more than 40 researchers, most of them living in, and working on, developing countries.

Their contributions illuminate, magnify, and discover anew the importance of improving early reading, through precise alignment of curriculum, teaching, and assessment, and with a special focus on some of the most under-studied countries in the world (e.g., Burkina Faso, Niger, and Senegal).

Through probing analyses of research, policy, and practice, the book highlights the common experiences of high aspirations repeatedly confronting harsh realities. Sixteen interconnected chapters cast an ever-vigilant and deflationary eye on the temptation to take an unrealistic approach to early literacy, and also caution against lumping all languages, contexts, and policy-challenges into a single heap.

This book provides an indispensable guide to policymakers, practitioners, educators, and academics working towards the realisation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Improving the teaching, learning, and assessment of early grade literacy is key not only to expanding the quality, access, and equity of education, but also to unlocking all the other SDGs, and ultimately to driving development.

Yvette V. Lapayese

In every corner of the world, children are learning languages at home that differ from the dominant language used in their broader social world. These children arrive at school with a precious resource: their mother tongue. In the face of this resource and the possibility for biliteracy, majority language educational programs do nothing to support primary language competence. To counter monolingual education, there are significant albeit few initiatives around the world that provide formal support for children to continue to develop competence in their mother tongue, while also learning an additional language or languages. One such initiative is dual language immersion education (DLI).

Interestingly, most (if not all) research on DLI programs focus on the effectiveness of bilingual education vis-à-vis academic access and achievement. The ideologies embedded in the research and guidelines for DLI education, albeit necessary and critical during the early days of DLI schooling, are disconnected from the present realities, epistemologies, and humanness of our bilingual youth.

A Humanizing Dual Language Immersion Education envisions a framework informed by bilingual teachers and students who support biliteracy as a human right. Positioning bilingual education under a human rights framework addresses the basic right of our bi/multilingual youth to human dignity. Respect for the languages of persons belonging to different linguistic communities is essential for a just and democratic society. Given the centrality of language to our sense of who we are and where we fit in the broader world, a connection between linguistic human rights and bilingual education is essential.

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Edited by Michael Macaluso and Kati Macaluso

The canon, as much an ideology as it is a body of texts perceived to be intrinsic to the high school English classroom, has come under scrutiny for maintaining status quo narratives about whiteness, masculinity, heterosexuality, ability, and even those associated with American ideals of self-reliance, the good life, and the self-made man. Teaching practices around these texts may also reinforce harmful practices and ways of thinking, including those connected to notions of culture, literary merit, and methods of reading, teaching, and learning.

Teaching the Canon in 21st Century Classrooms offers innovative, critical ways of reading, thinking about, and teaching canonical texts in 21st century classrooms. Responding to the increasingly pluralized, digitized, global 21st century English classroom, chapter authors make explicit the ideologies of a canonical text of focus, while also elaborating a pedagogical approach that de-centers the canon, bridges past and present, applies critical theory, and celebrates the rich identities of 21st century readers. In using this book, teachers will be especially poised to take on the canon in their classroom and, thus, to open up their curricula to ideas, values, concerns, and narratives beyond those embedded in the canonical texts.

Knowledge Mobilization in TESOL

Connecting Research and Practice

Edited by Sardar M. Anwaruddin

Most debates about the so-called research-practice gap in TESOL have focused on a one-way transfer of research evidence from the context of origin to the context of application. Rather than continuing such debates, Knowledge Mobilization in TESOL: Connecting Research and Practice sheds light on what happens after research is transferred to contexts of practice such as the classroom. It explores whether or not, and under what circumstances, research can make contributions to teachers’ professional learning and development. By featuring English language teachers’ first-hand accounts of research utilization, the book highlights the complex processes of making research-based knowledge meaningful for pedagogical practice. It shows why the success of any knowledge mobilization project depends on sensitivity to context and teachers’ interpretive engagement with research-based recommendations.

Written in a lucid and accessible style, Knowledge Mobilization in TESOL: Connecting Research and Practice will appeal to a broad readership interested in research utilization in the field of education, especially in TESOL. It will be an informative text for pre-service and graduate courses in TESOL, ELT, applied linguistics, teacher education, and education policy studies. In-service teachers, teacher educators, program administrators, and funding agencies will also find it to be a valuable resource.

Contributors are: Chris Banister, Leigh Yohei Bennett, Xin Chen, Tiffany Johnson, Kendon Kurzer, Cynthia Macknish, Michael McLelland, Nashwa Donna M. Neary, Gina Paschalidou, Aysenur Sagdic, Nashaat Sobhy, Nguyen Thi Thuy Loan, Lorena Valmori, and Robert E. White.

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Edited by Maryam Azarnoosh, Mitra Zeraatpishe, Akram Faravani and Hamid Reza Kargozari

Issues in Coursebook Evaluation takes a theory to practice approach with emphasis on theoretical underpinnings that lead into practical aspects of the processes of evaluating English language coursebooks. The ten reader-friendly chapters contributed by outstanding scholars cover fundamental concepts in book evaluation which turn this work to a valuable resource book in applied linguistics. The topics covered include the need to evaluate books (why, who, how and when), language learners’ needs, evaluating language and content of coursebooks, evaluating teaching aids, intercultural and socio-cultural perspectives in coursebooks and their evaluation, how to evaluate the authenticity of conversations in ESL textbooks, evaluating ESP textbooks, e-textbook evaluation, and the influence of research on materials evaluation.

Contributors are: Maryam Azarnoosh, Saleh Al-Busaidi, Darío Luis Banegas, Martin Cortazzi, Akram Faravani, Lixian Jin, Hamid Reza Kargozari, Mahboobeh Khosrojerdi, Thom Kiddle, Jayakaran Mukundan, Vahid Nimehchisalem, Golnaz Peyvandi, Seyed Ali Rezvani Kalajahi, Carlos Rico-Troncoso, Lilia Savova, Abdolvahed Zarifi, and Mitra Zeraatpishe.

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Edited by Mitra Zeraatpishe, Akram Faravani, Hamid Reza Kargozari and Maryam Azarnoosh

A reflective teacher as a growth-minded person seeks opportunities to continue professional development. Reflection not only ignites a teacher’s desire for improvement, but also inspires continuous learning. Through an accurate grasp of self-assessment, confidence, self-appraisal, a reflective practitioner can plant the seeds of effective teaching. This book aims to guide EFL teachers to teach language reflectively and effectively. It includes two parts, the first focuses on the SLA theories and their impact on language teaching and the second centers on the reflective and effective teaching of language components and skills. The editors hope this book will be helpful to those wishing to become effective teachers since this results in nurturing learners’ cravings to learn in a safe and supportive environment.

Contributors are: Maryam Azarnoosh, Anne Burns, Graham V. Crookes, Michael R.W. Dawson, Richard R. Day, Akram Faravani, Dorothy Gillmeister, Christine C. M. Goh, Hamid Reza Kargozari, John M. Levis, John I. Liontas, Shawn Loewen, Parviz Maftoon, Jennifer Majorana, Shannon McCrocklin, Hossein Nassaji, Ulugbek Nurmukhamedov, Luke Plonsky, Nima Shakouri, Jun Tian, Laurens Vandergrift, Constance Weaver, and Mitra Zeraatpishe.

Challenging Genres

Comics and Graphic Novels

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Paul L. Thomas

Comic books achieved almost immediate popularity and profitability when they were first introduced in the U. S. throughout the late 1930s and early 1940s. But comic books soon suffered attacks concerning the quality of this new genre/medium combining text and artwork.
With the rise of graphic novels in the mid-1980s and the adaptation of comics to films in the twenty-first century, comics and graphic novels have gained more respect as craft and text—called "sequential art" by foundational legend Will Eisner—but the genre/medium remains marginalized by educators, parents, and the public.
Challenging Genres: Comic Books and Graphic Novels offers educators, students, parents, and comic book readers and collectors a comprehensive exploration of comics/graphic novels as a challenging genre/medium.
This volume presents a history of comic books/graphic novels, an argument for valuing the genre/medium, and several chapters devoted to examining all subgenres of comics/graphic novels. Readers will discover key comics, graphic novels, and film adaptations suitable for the classroom—and for anyone serious about high quality texts. Further, this volume places comics/graphic novels within our growing understanding of multiliteracies and critical literacy.