Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 49 items for :

  • Brill | Sense x
  • Legal History x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All Modify Search

The Acquisition of Africa (1870-1914)

The Nature of International Law

Series:

Mieke van der Linden

Over recent decades, the responsibility for the past actions of the European colonial powers in relation to their former colonies has been subject to a lively debate. In this book, the question of the responsibility under international law of former colonial States is addressed. Such a legal responsibility would presuppose the violation of the international law that was applicable at the time of colonization. In the ‘Scramble for Africa’ during the Age of New Imperialism (1870-1914), European States and non-State actors mainly used cession and protectorate treaties to acquire territorial sovereignty (imperium) and property rights over land (dominium). The question is raised whether Europeans did or did not on a systematic scale breach these treaties in the context of the acquisition of territory and the expansion of empire, mainly through extending sovereignty rights and, subsequently, intervening in the internal affairs of African political entities.

Rule-Formulation and Binding Precedent in the Madhhab-Law Tradition

Ibn Quṭlūbughā’s Commentary on The Compendium of Qudūrī

Series:

Talal Al-Azem

In Rule-Formulation and Binding Precedent in the Madhhab-Law Tradition, Talal Al-Azem argues for the existence of a madhhab-law tradition’ of jurisprudence underpinning the four post-classical Sunni schools of law. This tradition celebrated polyvalence by preserving the multiplicity of conflicting opinions within each school, while simultaneously providing a process of rule formulation ( tarjīḥ) by which one opinion is chosen as the binding precedent ( taqlīd). The predominant forum of both activities, he shows, was the legal commentary.

Through a careful reading of Ibn Quṭlūbughā's (d. 879/1474) al-Taṣḥīḥ wa-al-tarjīḥ, Al-Azem presents a new periodisation of the Ḥanafī madhhab, analyses the theory of rule formulation, and demonstrates how this madhhab-law tradition facilitated both continuity and legal change while serving as the basis of a pluralistic Mamluk judicial system.

Series:

Manon van der Heijden

Crime is men’s business, isn’t it? Women are responsible for 10 percent of crime in Europe. Yet, if we look at the Dutch Republic in the early modern period, we find that in the towns of Holland women played a much larger role in crime. In a number of early modern towns about half of the criminals convicted in court were women. These women were in vulnerable positions and thus more likely to become involved in crime. They also had a relatively independent status and led remarkably public lives. Manon van der Heijden convincingly shows that it is the very combination of women’s vulnerability and independence that accounts for the high female crime rates in Holland between 1600 and 1800.

Law, Territory and Conflict Resolution

Law as a Problem and Law as a Solution

Series:

Edited by Matteo Nicolini, Francesco Palermo and Enrico Milano

Prompted by the de facto secession of Crimea in early 2014, Law, Territory and Conflict Resolution explores the role of law in territorial disputes, and therefore sheds light on the legal ‘realities’ in territorial conflicts. Seventeen scholars with backgrounds in comparative constitutional law and international law critically reflect on the well-established assumption that law is ‘part of the solution’ in territorial conflicts and ask whether the law cannot equally be ‘part of the problem’. The volume examines theory, practice, legislation and jurisprudence from various case studies, thus offering further insights on the following complex issue: can law act as an effective instrument for the governance of territorial disputes and conflicts?

The Protectors of Indians in the Royal Audience of Lima

History, Careers and Legal Culture, 1575-1775

Series:

Mauricio Novoa

In The Protectors of Indians in the Royal Audience of Lima: History, Careers and Legal Culture, 1575-1775 Mauricio Novoa offers an account of the institution that developed in the vice-royalty of Peru for the protection of Indians before the high courts of justice. Making use of historical materials, Novoa provides a comprehensive view on the formation of the legal elite in Lima during the colonial period; reviews the litigation undertaken by indigenous plaintiffs, and explains the legal culture that allowed the development of juristic doctrine around the Indian personal status.

The Spirit of Korean Law

Korean Legal History in Context

Series:

Edited by Marie Kim

This is the first book on Korean legal history in English written by a group of leading scholars from around the world. The chapters set forth the developments of Korean law from the Chosŏn to colonial and modern periods through the examination of codified laws, legal theories and practices, and jurisprudence. The contributors’ shared premise is that the evolution of Korean law can be best understood when viewed in terms of its interactions with outside laws. Each chapter integrates literature in Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and Western languages into comprehensive analyses to make up-to-date research available to readers both inside and outside Korea. This volume provides a solid framework from which to approach Korean legal history in the perspective of comparative legal traditions.

Kings, Knights and Bankers

The Collected Articles of Richard W. Kaeuper

Series:

Richard Kaeuper and Christopher Guyol

In Kings, Knights, and Bankers, Richard Kaeuper presents a lifetime of medieval research on Italian financiers, English kingship, chivalric violence, and knightly piety. His foundational work on public finance connects Italian merchant banking with the growth of state power at the turn of the fourteenth century. Subsequent articles on law and order offer measured contributions to the continuing debate over the growth of governance and its relationship with contemporary disorder. He also convincingly proves that knights, the foremost military professionals of the medieval world, considered their prowess as both a source of honor and of sanctification. All interested in the history of medieval chivalry, governance, piety, and public finance can learn from this impressive collection of articles.

Barry Hawk

Well before states, literacy, or legal systems, there were commerce and trade, which are found in all societies irrespective of politics, social norms or ideologies. Athenian landowners, Roman senators and Qing mandarins screened their participation in commerce and trade. Legal and informal institutions were developed to secure persons and property, resolve commercial disputes, raise capital and share risk, promote fair dealing, regulate agents and gather market information. Law and Commerce in Pre-Industrial Societies examines commerce, its participants and these institutions through the lens of nine pre-industrial societies: Hunter/gatherers, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Athens, Rome, the early Islamic world, medieval Europe, medieval Southern India and Qing China. The book provides historical perspective to contemporary debates about the relationship between commerce and law, public ordering versus privately created systems of law, the rule of law and the relative merits of courts versus merchant networks to resolve disputes.

Series:

Martin J. Cable

In Cum essem in Constantie, Martin John Cable presents a study of the Padua university jurist Raffaele Fulgosio (Fulgosius) (1367-1427) and his work as an advocate at the Council of Constance in 1414-15.
Through the use of archival material and evidence drawn from Fulgosio’s works, the book reveals a vivid picture both of teaching practice at a medieval university and the life and output of a working lawyer in early fifteenth-century Italy.
The book recreates much of Fulgosio’s workload at Constance and his involvement there in debates about representation, imperial and papal power and the Donation of Constantine.

Toward the Reform of Private Waqfs

A Comparative Study of Islamic Waqfs and English Trusts

Series:

Hamid Harasani

Using a combination of the comparative legal method and hermeneutics, this book reconciles Islamic law with English trust’s law in these two main areas. It does not find it necessary for one legal system to reign supreme over the other, as such solutions will be questioned by the internal subjects of the dominated legal system, undermining the efficacy of this study. Rather, reconciliation is a mutual step to congruence taken by both legal systems. In the area of perpetuities, the book finds that neither Islamic Waqfs must be perpetual, nor common law trusts must have a rule against perpetuities. Regarding ownership theories, the multiplicity of rendered theories in both legal systems presents more than one avenue of reconciliation. Overall, the study finds that private Waqfs and private trusts can be reconciled without undermining the internal hermeneutic standpoints of both legal systems.