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Operieren mit Zeit

Empirie und Theorie von Zeitstrukturen in Lehr-Lernprozessen

Kathrin Berdelmann

In Lehr-Lernprozessen kommt dem Faktor Zeit eine überragende Bedeutung zu, da Lehren und Lernen als zeitliche Prozesse Synchronisation erfordern.
In diesem Buch wird erstmals ein empirisch fundiertes Modell von Zeitstrukturen entwickelt. Ausgehend von der Operativen Pädagogik werden Formen der Synchronisation des Lehrens und Lernens identifiziert und analysiert. In diesem Zusammenhang stellt die Studie auch die Rückseite der Synchronisation, Asynchronisation, als zentrales Moment heraus. Indem aufgezeigt wird, dass in Lehr-Lernprozessen asynchrone Momente unverzichtbar sind, erscheint die Differenz von 'subjektiver' und 'objektiver' Zeit nicht länger als pädagogisches Problem. Vielmehr stellt sich eine Vielfalt divergierender Zeitstrukturen als strukturelle Voraussetzung für die Realisierung von Lehr-Lernprozessen dar. Diese sind durch eine relative zeitliche Koordination gekennzeichnet: durch das dynamische und flexible Oszillieren zwischen Synchronisation und Asynchronisation.

Drawn Toward Transformation

Conversations on Teaching and Learning Drawing

Nadine Kalin

This book examines the transformative potential of collaborative teacher research. Specifically, Kalin shares the perspectives of educators as they investigate the teaching and learning of drawing within their own elementary classrooms and within the context of an action research group. The innovative a/r/tographic design of the project provides a rich balance between the arts and educational research,
as it allows for the complex unfolding of relational transformation, alongside the artistic renditions of each person exploring their understandings of drawing. The products and processes of this book provide alternative approaches for the design of future pre-service and in-service programs that aim to serve teachers as learners rather than teachers as teachers. In this vein, the book offers worthy insights into how the arts and collaborative action research groups assist participants in finding other ways of seeing, imaging, and knowing the world. The book will appeal to practitioners, teacher educators, educational researchers, as well as those interested in professional development, complexity thinking, curriculum studies, collaborative action research, and arts-based educational research methodologies.

Edited by Jinfa Cai, Gabriele Kaiser, Bob Perry and Ngai-Ying Wong

What is effective mathematics teaching? This book represents the first purposeful cross-cultural collection of studies to answer this question from teachers’ perspectives. It focuses particularly on how teachers view effective teaching of mathematics. Teachers’ voices are heard and celebrated throughout the studies reported in this volume. These studies are drawn from many parts of the world representing both Eastern and Western cultural traditions. The editors and authors have deliberately included the views of teachers and educators from different cultural backgrounds, taking into account that beliefs on effective mathematics teaching and its features are highly influenced by one’s own culture.
The book will provide readers and scholars with the stimulus to take the ideas presented and expand on them in ways that help improve mathematics education for children, teachers and researchers in both the East and the West.

Evidence-Based Teaching

Strategies that Promote Learning

Robyn M. Gillies

Public school systems are now under increasing pressure to close achievement gaps between the able and less-able students, minority and non-minority students, and disadvantaged students and their non-disadvantaged peers. Moreover, there is now an expectation that schools and teachers will use those programs and practices that have been demonstrated to be are efficacious through rigorous scientific research.
Evidence-based teaching: Strategies that promote learning is designed to provide teachers with an overview of the types of evidence that can be used to enhance their teaching practices. It does this by documenting those practices that have been used effectively in classrooms to facilitate how teachers teach and how students learn. This text is designed to make teachers aware of how to critically evaluate different types of evidence that can be used to inform their teaching practice. It achieves this by making explicit the link between theory, research and practice.

Bryant Griffith

The craft of teaching and learning is like playing in a symphony orchestra; every instrument has a voice and every voice is integral to the whole. The arts, history, anthropology, and philosophy and their forged discourses offer us a series of cautionary tales about the multiplicity of ways we can see and understand our world, ways we often ignore in the classroom. In the case of epistemology, and pedagogy in particular, we have hinged our understanding on a binary of opposites engaged in a dialectic dance and a type of discourse constructed to describe and explain it. The art and act of teaching in this as-if world necessitates teachers to be public intellectuals; intellectual symbols who represent something more than just subject-knowledge expertise but serve as conduits between the discourses of our world.
Established genres and discourses are exclusionary. The vast migration of people and ideas is producing a new set of presuppositions. The manner in which we decode other discourses and fuse them into meanings, both personal and shared, is the root of both teaching and learning, giving us a window into the way that each form of thought is connected, both historically and experientially. Look around you, your school is becoming the United Nations, but it’s not so united. Don’t aim for truth, aim for understanding. Today’s students construct and deconstruct in a multitude of ways on an as-needed, just-in-time basis. Since ideas of difference are often nudged but unacknowledged, we are in danger of becoming pedagogical dinosaurs, not heeding change until it is too late.
Teaching and learning are construction zones, so get out your hard hat. These constructions are possibilities that need to be discussed and negotiated, allowing us to sidestep the traps of grand narratives and a hierarchy of discplinarity and research methodology. Our possibilities need to be forged on an anvil of diversity. These are the spaces, the interstices, where our voices become innovative and our silence offers a safe harbor. Spaces to listen, collaborate, and craft cautionary tales about our lives and the possibilities for a shared future.

Series:

Edited by Cher Ping Lim, Kenneth Cock, Graeme Lock and Christopher Brook

Pre-service teacher education is a crucial component of the lifelong process of the professional development of teachers as it equips prospective teachers with the necessary and sufficient competencies to design meaningful and authentic learning environments that engage students in the learning process. If done well, it enhances the quality and improves upon the retention of teachers in the profession. This book is important because it attempts to deconstruct the nature and describe the practice of current pre-service courses and programs in the Asia-Pacific region, examine new paradigms of pre-service teacher education and their implications for practice, and explore emerging innovative practices. Moreover, this book’s particular focus on engaging new partners and on harnessing required resources and capacities in the process; together with the particular role that new technologies may play in the new partnerships is especially valuable. Drawing upon leading scholars of teacher education from the Asia-Pacific region, the 12 chapters in this book are divided into three main sections to revitalize and inform the scholarship and debate on teacher education:
—Examining Pre-Service Teacher Education
—Engaging Partners in Pre-Service Teacher Education
—Emerging Practices in Pre-Service Teacher Education

Reclaiming Dissent

Civics Education for the 21st Century

Series:

Edited by Mordechai Gordon

Reclaiming Dissent is a unique collection of essays that focus on the value of dissent for the survival of democracy in the United States and the role that education can play with respect to this virtue. The various contributors to this volume share the conviction that the vitality of a democracy depends on the ability of ordinary citizens to debate and oppose the decisions of their government. Yet recent history in the United States suggests that dissent is discouraged and even suppressed in the political, cultural and educational arenas. Many Americans are not even aware that democracy is not primarily about voting every four years or majority rule, but about actively participating in public debates and civic action. This book makes a strong case for the need to reclaim a tradition in the United States, like the one that existed during the Civil Rights Era, in which dissent, opposition, and conflict were part of the daily fabric of our democracy. Teacher educators, teacher candidates, new teachers, and educators in general can greatly benefit from reading this book.

Series:

Edited by Cynthia A. Lassonde and Sally Galman

Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators is a comprehensive text that delineates a range of research methodologies. This edited volume, with many chapters written by self-study scholars who are noted in the field for particular methodological and epistemological perspectives, helps fill the gap in the literature on self-study research methods. It provides readers with an opportunity to examine various methodologies which will not only help them deepen their understanding of research but also, will allow them to select one that best suits their needs. Both new and experienced researchers will find this text valuable. We consider Self-Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators a valuable contribution to the field of teacher education.

Teacher Assemblage

International Perspectives

P. Taylor Webb

Teacher Assemblage is a groundbreaking report in the tradition of fieldwork in philosophy, using Michel Foucault’s and Gilles Deleuze’s ideas to better understand how accountability policy affected teachers. The case study examines different vectors of power and demonstrates how teachers interacted with each other, and interacted with their immediate policy environments. This unique book provides readers with grounded insights into Foucault’s and Deleuze’s ideas by paying close attention to the macro- and micro- political worlds of schools as teachers struggle with new forms of performance accountability. The book illustrates ideas of power, politics, and policy with a unique use of surrealist art to illustrate the philosophical ideas at play in the case study. The book will have a wide appeal to teachers, teacher educators, educational researchers, policy and curriculum scholars, art aficionados, and those interested in the thoughts of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze.

Teachers' Professional Development

Aims, Modules, Evaluation

Edited by Frank Achtenhagen, Fritz K. Oser and Ursula Renold

Within the central topics of the debate on teachers’ professionalism are the problems of research-based and evidence-based initial and lifelong teacher behavior. Although the statements on professional similarities of teacher actions with those of other (academic) professionals are very plausible, there remains a central task for teacher education programs: How to develop towards such expertise—which is equal to evidence convictions—effectively and efficiently. Which role do scientific research and its results play in this context? How can research results be converted into recommendations for teacher actions?
The contributions to this book focus on central problems of the conversion process: In the first part the goal dimension is treated: Maiello & Oser emphasize the relationship of central variables of teacher behaviour as identity, professional satisfaction or self-efficacy to teachers’ professional behaviour; Blömeke, Felbrich & Müller discuss the role of future teachers’ beliefs on the nature of mathematics; Stevenson uses cultural historical activity theory to work out cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education; Gruber tackles the problem of how vocational teachers can be supported to become experts by discussing especially four major possible research strategies.
The second part of this book is dedicated to possible intervention approaches by which the gap of theory and practice shall be bridged. Steiner & Steiner report on critical learning incidents which heavily influence the micro-processes which characterize teachers’ instructional measures; Winther differentiates the trait and state perspective of motivation with regard to their consequences for the learning process; Boekaerts focuses on aspects of collaborative learning; Weber sharpens her deliberations explicitly to a design experiment on the problem of initiating intercultural learning.
The third part of this book is a report of the use and the consequences of Oser’s model of teaching standards. Baer, Dörr, Fraefel, Kocher, Kiester, Larcher, Müller, Sempert & Wyss show results of a large study on the development of teacher competences run in Switzerland and Germany. The study observes the competence development of prospective teachers from the beginning of their teaching training up to the job entry phase. This book is published under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology.