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Gertjan Verhasselt

This book is the first volume to appear in print since 1999 in Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Continued, which continues Felix Jacoby’s monumental but uncompleted collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It is part of section IV B (History of Literature, Music, Art and Culture) and provides a critical edition, translation and commentary of the fragments of Dikaiarchos, a pupil of Aristotle from late fourth century BCE. Dikaiarchos wrote about cultural history, literature, philosophers, politics, geography, ethics and the soul. The book advances the state of the art by presenting a new text and demarcation of the fragments, a study of the method of the authors citing Dikaiarchos, new readings and interpretations of the fragments and a reassessment of Dikaiarchos’ value as a historian.

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Gijsbert Jonkers

In The Textual Tradition of Plato's Timaeus and Critias, Gijsbert Jonkers provides new insights into the extant ancient and medieval evidence for the text of both Platonic dialogues. The discussions are set in the broader context of examinations in recent decades of the textual traditions of other individual Platonic works. Particularly the vast collection of testimonia of the Timaeus, one of Plato's most read, interpreted and discussed dialogues of all times, will be of interest for students of ancient philosophy, science and philology.

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Edited by Sharon Weisser and Naly Thaler

Strategies of Polemics in Greek and Roman Philosophy brings together papers written by specialists in the field of ancient philosophy on the topic of polemics. Despite the central role played by polemics in ancient philosophy, the forms and mechanisms of philosophical polemics are not usually the subject of systematic scholarly attention. The present volume seeks to shed new light on familiar texts by approaching them from this neglected angle. The contributions address questions such as: What is the role of polemic in a philosophical discourse? What were the polemical strategies developed by ancient philosophers? To what extent did polemics contribute to the shaping of important philosophical doctrines or standpoint?

Ancient Concepts of the Hippocratic

Papers Presented at the XIIIth International Hippocrates Colloquium, Austin, Texas, August 2008 

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Edited by Lesley Dean-Jones and Ralph M. Rosen

In Ancient Concepts of the Hippocratic, Lesley Dean-Jones and Ralph Rosen have gathered 19 international authorities in ancient medicine to identify commonalities among the treatises of the Hippocratic Corpus which led scholars of antiquity to group them under the single name of Hippocrates. Most recent scholarship has drawn attention to the divergences between individual treatises and groups of treatises, emphasizing the agonistic facet of the ancient medical profession. In contrast, in this volume contributors look to find points of agreement between the writings that go beyond claims of rationality. Topics considered include ontological claims about the discipline of medicine itself, the view of the patient as a perceiving unity, theories on the function of glands and the importance of regimen.

Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Sophistry in the High Roman Empire

Maximus of Tyre and Twelve Other Intellectuals

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Jeroen Lauwers

How is it possible that modern scholars have labelled Maximus of Tyre, a second-century CE performer of philosophical orations, as a sophist or a ‘half-philosopher’, while his own self-presentation is that of a genuine philosopher? If we take Maximus’ claim to philosophical authority seriously, his case can deepen our understanding of the dynamic nature of Imperial philosophy. Through a discursive analysis of twelve Imperial intellectuals alongside Maximus’ dialexeis, the author proposes an interpretative framework to assess the purpose behind the representation of philosophy, rhetoric, and sophistry in Maximus’ oeuvre. This is thus as yet the first book-length attempt at situating the historical communication process implicit in the surviving Maximean texts in the concurrent context of the Imperial intellectual world.

Herrscherideal und Herrschaftskritik bei Philo von Alexandria

Eine Untersuchung am Beispiel seiner Josephsdarstellung in De Josepho und De somniis II

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Friederike Oertelt

Die in der Arbeit vorgenomme Auslegung der Schriften De Josepho und De Somniis II von Philo von Alexandria liest die beiden gegensätzlichen Darstellungen der Josephfigur als Beitrag zum Herrschaftsdiskurs. Die ambivalenten Tendenzen der biblischen Josephfigur bilden für ihn den Ausgangspunkt am Beispiel Josephs, Strukturen sowohl tyrannischer als auch idealer Herrschaft zu untersuchen. Philos Kenntnis griechisch-hellenistischer Philosophie sowie sein Verständnis der Tora als göttlich inspiriertem Text ermöglicht ihm, den politischen Charakter auf unterschiedlichen Ebenen zu reflektieren. Die Spannung zwischen beiden Traktaten bleibt dabei bestehen und kann als bewusste Darstellung gelungener und tyrannischer Herrschaft gedeutet werden. Zugleich entwickelt Philo aus den Ambivalenzen der Josephfigur heraus ein Herrschaftskonzept, welches aufgrund des Toraverständnisses politisches Handeln aus Abhängigkeiten befreit und universale Handlungsvorgaben und Kontrollinstanzen aufzeigt.

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The exegesis of De Josepho and De Somniis II intended in this work read the two portrayals of Joseph as Philo’s contribution to the discourse on government. The ambivalent tendencies in the Joseph figure form the point of departure for Philo in using it for examining structures of tyrannical and ideal rule. Philo’s knowledge of Greek-Hellenistic philosophy and his understanding of the Torah enables him to reflect upon the political character on different levels. Thus the tension between both treatises can be interpreted as a conscious portrayal of effective and of tyrannical rule. At the same time Philo develops a concept of government out of the ambivalences of the Joseph figure, which, on the basis of the understanding of the Torah, liberates political action from dependencies and points out universal guidelines for action and the authorities responsible for control of them.

'Anonymus Aurelianensis III' in Aristotelis Analytica priora

Critical edition, Introduction, Notes, and Indexes

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Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist

This is the first critical edition of the earliest known Latin commentary on Aristotle’s Prior Analytics, the Anonymus Aurelianensis III. In addition to the critical text, Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist’s edition contains a comparative analysis of the anonymous commentary and the extant Greek commentaries as well as a full comparison between Boethius’ translation and the translation used by the commentator. The edition provides a solid foundation for further study on the earliest medieval exegesis on the Prior Analytics and is an essential resource for any scholar who wants to learn more about the development of logic in general and the medieval reception of Aristotelian syllogistic in particular.

Studies in Matthew's Gospel

Literary Design, Intertextuality, and Social Setting

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W.J.C. Weren

These Studies in Matthew’s Gospel by Wim J.C. Weren are the result of scholarly work carried out using recent methods in Biblical exegesis such as structural analysis, text semantics and intertextuality. Part One presents a new proposal regarding the macrostructure of Matthew’s Gospel and discusses meanings of textual units from this Gospel on the basis of synchronic research. In Part Two, intertextual theories are described and practical tools are developed that enable us to identify various types of relations between texts from Matthew’s Gospel and co-generic or co-thematic textual units from the Hebrew Bible, the Septuagint and early Jewish and early Christian writings. Part Three answers the question to what extent the ways in which the disciples are portrayed in Matthew is related to ‘real’ groups in the Matthean communities. The three successive steps are deliberately chosen and are in a complementary relationship to each other.

The Space of Time

A Sensualist Interpretation of Time in Augustine, Confessions X to XII

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David van Dusen

From Robert Grosseteste to Jean-François Lyotard, Augustine’s suggestion that time is a “dilation of the soul” ( distentio animi) has been taken up as a seminal and controversial time-concept, yet in The Space of Time, David van Dusen argues that this ‘dilation’ has been fundamentally misinterpreted.
Time in Confessions XI is a dilation of the senses—in beasts, as in humans. And Augustine’s time-concept in Confessions XI is not Platonic—but in schematic terms, Epicurean.
Identifying new influences on the Confessions—from Aristoxenus to Lucretius—while keeping Augustine’s phenomenological interpreters in view, The Space of Time is a path-breaking work on Confessions X to XII and a ranging contribution to the history of the concept of time.

ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī’s Philosophical Journey

From Aristotle’s Metaphysics to the ‘Metaphysical Science’

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Cecilia Martini Bonadeo

Although the philosopher ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī (1162 -1231) received an extensive education in the thought of Avicenna, he still journeyed long in search of true philosophy. It was in Cairo that he finally discovered a model of philosophical metaphysics rooted in Greek thought as set out in Kindian and Farabian writings. This volume is devoted to the study of Aristotle’s Metaphysics and other Greek metaphysical writing gathered together by this Muslim philosopher to form a ‘Metaphysical Science’ in his Book of the Science of Metaphysics ( Kitāb fī ʿilm mā baʿd al-ṭabīʿa).