Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 63 items for :

  • Brill | Sense x
  • Slavic and Eurasian Studies x
  • Status (Books): Published x

Making Ethnicity in Southern Bessarabia

Tracing the Histories of an Ambiguous Concept in a Contested Land

Series:

Simon Schlegel

In Making Ethnicity, Simon Schlegel offers a history of ethnicity and its political uses in southern Bessarabia, a region that has long been at the crossroads of powerful forces: in the 19th century between the Russian and Ottoman Empires, since World War I between the Soviet Union and Romania, and since the collapse of the Soviet Union between Russia and the European Union’s respective zones of influence.
Drawing on biographical interviews and archival documents, Schlegel argues that ethnic categories gained relevance in the 19th century, as state bureaucrats took over local administration from the church. After mutating into a dangerous instrument of social engineering in the mid-20th century, ethnicity today remains a potent force for securing votes and allocating resources.

Series:

Markian Prokopovych, Carl Bethke and Tamara Scheer

The Habsburg Empire often features in scholarship as a historical example of how language diversity and linguistic competence were essential to the functioning of the imperial state. Focusing critically on the urban-rural divide, on the importance of status for multilingual competence, on local governments, schools, the army and the urban public sphere, and on linguistic policies and practices in transition, this collective volume provides further evidence for both the merits of how language diversity was managed in Austria-Hungary and the problems and contradictions that surrounded those practices. The book includes contributions by Pieter M. Judson, Marta Verginella, Rok Stergar, Anamarija Lukić, Carl Bethke, Irina Marin, Ágoston Berecz, Csilla Fedinec, István Csernicskó, Matthäus Wehowski, Jan Fellerer, and Jeroen van Drunen.

Liberalism, Constitutional Nationalism, and Minorities  

The Making of Romanian Citizenship, c. 1750–1918

Series:

Constantin Iordachi

Winner of the 2019 CEU Award for Outstanding Research

This book documents the making of Romanian citizenship from 1750 to 1918 as a series of acts of national self-determination by the Romanians, as well as the emancipation of subordinated gender, social, and ethno-religious groups. It focuses on the progression of a sum of transnational “questions” that were at the heart of North-Atlantic, European, and local politics during the long nineteenth century, concerning the status of peasants, women, Greeks, Jews, Roma, Armenians, Muslims, and Dobrudjans. The analysis emphasizes the fusion between nationalism and liberalism, and the emancipatory impact national-liberalism had on the transition from the Old Regime to the modern order of the nation-state. While emphasizing liberalism's many achievements, the study critically scrutinizes the liberal doctrine of legal-political “capacity” and the dark side of nationalism, marked by tendencies toward exclusion. It highlights the challenges nascent liberal democracies face in the process of consolidation and the enduring appeal of illiberalism in periods of upheaval, represented mainly by nativism. The book's innovative interdisciplinary approach to citizenship in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman Balkans and the richness of the sources employed, appeal to a diverse readership.

Celebrating Suprematism

New Approaches to the Art of Kazimir Malevich

Series:

Christina Lodder

Celebrating Suprematism throws vital new light on Kazimir Malevich’s abstract style and the philosophical, scientific, aesthetic, and ideological context within which it emerged and developed. The essays in the collection, which have been produced by established specialists as well as new scholars in the field, tackle a wide range of issues and establish a profound and nuanced appreciation of Suprematism’s place in twentieth-century visual and intellectual culture. Complementing detailed analyses of The Black Square (1915), Malevich’s theories and statements, various developments at Unovis, Suprematism’s relationship to ether physics, and the impact that Malevich’s style had on the design of textiles, porcelain and architecture, there are also discussions of Suprematism’s relationship to Russian Constructivism and avant-garde groups in Poland and Hungary.

Series:

Edited by Niklas Bernsand and Barbara Törnquist-Plewa

In Cultural and Political Imaginaries in Putin’s Russia scholars scrutinise developments in official symbolical, cultural and social policies as well as the contradictory trajectories of important cultural, social and intellectual trends in Russian society after the year 2000. Engaging experts on Russia from several academic fields, the book offers case studies on the vicissitudes of cultural policies, political ideologies and imperial visions, on memory politics on the grassroot as well as official levels, and on the links between political and national imaginaries and popular culture in fields as diverse as fashion design and pro-natalist advertising. Contributors are Niklas Bernsand, Lena Jonson, Ekaterina Kalinina, Natalija Majsova, Olga Malinova, Alena Minchenia, Elena Morenkova-Perrier, Elena Rakhimova-Sommers, Andrei Rogatchevski, Tomas Sniegon, Igor Torbakov, Barbara Törnquist-Plewa, and Yuliya Yurchuk.

Pillars of the Profession

The Correspondence of Richard Pipes and Marc Raeff

Series:

Jonathan Daly

Richard Pipes and Marc Raeff were two of the most prolific and influential historians of Russia that America ever produced. They met at Harvard in 1946 and went on, for most of the following six decades, to debate history, share ideas, comment on each other's work, and inspire one another intellectually. In Pillars of the Profession: The Correspondence of Richard Pipes and Marc Raeff, Jonathan Daly presents the 158 letters these scholars and friends exchanged from 1948 until 2007. Thoughtful introductory and concluding essays, detailed annotations, a wealth of photographs and other illustrations, a chronology of major events, and four maps make this volume an important addition to Russian historiography.

Scaling the Balkans

Essays on Eastern European Entanglements

Series:

Maria N. Todorova

Scaling the Balkans puts in conversation several fields that have been traditionally treated as discrete: Balkan studies, Ottoman studies, East European studies, and Habsburg and Russian studies. By looking at the complex interrelationship between countries and regions, demonstrating how different perspectives and different methodological approaches inflect interpretations and conclusions, it insists on the heuristic value of scales. The volume is a collection of published and unpublished essays, dealing with issues of modernism, backwardness, historical legacy, balkanism, post-colonialism and orientalism, nationalism, identity and alterity, society-and nation-building, historical demography and social structure, socialism and communism in memory, and historiography.

Atlas of Southeast Europe

Geopolitics and History. Volume Three: 1815-1926

Series:

Hans H.A. Hötte

Edited by Gábor Demeter and Dávid Turbucs

This atlas offers a survey of the history of Southeast Europe from 1815-1926, from the eve of the Second Serbian Uprising until the conclusion of the First World War for the Ottoman Empire. It covers modern-day Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Romania (Wallachia and Transylvania), Dalmatia, Greece and Cyprus.

The Asanids

The Political and Military History of the Second Bulgarian Empire (1185-1280)

Series:

Alexandru Madgearu

In The Asanids. The Political and Military History of the Second Bulgarian Empire (1185-1280), Alexandru Madgearu offers the first comprehensive history in English of a state which played a major role in the evolution of the Balkan region during Middle Ages. This state emerged from the rebellion of two peoples, Romanians and Bulgarians, against Byzantine domination, within a few decades growing to a regional power that entered into conflict with Byzantium and with the Latin Empire of Constantinople. The founders were members of a Romanian (Vlach) family, whose intention was to revive the former Bulgarian state, the only legitimate political framework that could replace the Byzantine rule.

Symbolic Traces of Communist Legacy in Post-Socialist Hungary

Experiences of a Generation that Lived During the Socialist Era

Series:

Lisa Pope Fischer

In Symbolic Traces of Communist Legacy in Post-socialist Hungary, Lisa Pope Fischer shows how personal practices symbolically refurbish elements from the Communist era to fit present-day challenges. A generation who lived through the socialist period adapt to post-socialist Hungary in a global context. Life histories weave together case studies of gift giving, procurement strategies, harvest ritual, healthcare, and socialist kitsch to illustrate turns towards mysticism, neo-traditionalism, nostalgia, nationalism, and shifts in time-place. People’s unrequited past longing for future possibilities of a Western society facilitate desires for a lost way of life. Not only does this work gain understanding of an aging population’s life experiences and the politics of everyday practices, but also social change in a modern global world.