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Fenggang Yang

The speed and the scale with which traditional religions in China have been revived and new spiritual movements have emerged in recent decades make it difficult for scholars to stay up-to-date on the religious transformations within Chinese society.

This unique atlas presents a bird’s-eye view of the religious landscape in China today. In more than 150 full-color maps and six different case studies, it maps the officially registered venues of China’s major religions - Buddhism, Christianity (Protestant and Catholic), Daoism, and Islam - at the national, provincial, and county levels. The atlas also outlines the contours of Confucianism, folk religion, and the Mao cult. Further, it describes the main organizations, beliefs, and rituals of China’s main religions, as well as the social and demographic characteristics of their respective believers. Putting multiple religions side by side in their contexts, this atlas deploys the latest qualitative, quantitative and spatial data acquired from censuses, surveys, and fieldwork to offer a definitive overview of religion in contemporary China.

An essential resource for all scholars and students of religion and society in China.

A Modern Miscellany

Shanghai Cartoon Artists, Shao Xunmei’s Circle and the Travels of Jack Chen, 1926-1938

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Paul Bevan

In A Modern Miscellany: Shanghai Cartoon Artists, Shao Xunmei’s Circle and the Travels of Jack Chen, 1926-1938 Paul Bevan explores how the cartoon (manhua) emerged from its place in the Chinese modern art world to become a propaganda tool in the hands of left-wing artists. The artists involved in what was largely a transcultural phenomenon were an eclectic group working in the areas of fashion and commercial art and design. The book demonstrates that during the build up to all-out war the cartoon was not only important in the sphere of Shanghai popular culture in the eyes of the publishers and readers of pictorial magazines but that it occupied a central place in the primary discourse of Chinese modern art history.

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Michael Dillon

China’s economic development has become a matter of world-wide interest since the boom that began in the 1980s. Key Papers in Chinese Economic History since 1949 offers a selection of outstanding articles that trace the origins of the modern Chinese economy. Topics covered include agriculture and the rural economy; industrialisation and urbanisation; finance and capital; political economy and international connections.

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Paul W. Kroll

Winner of the 2015 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award
Also available in paperback. The work is also included in the Chinese-English Dictionary Online here.

A Student’s Dictionary of Classical and Medieval Chinese is the long-desired Chinese – English reference work for all those reading texts dating from the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty. Comprising 8,000+ characters, arranged alphabetically by Pinyin.
As a lexicon meant for practical use, it immensely facilitates reading and translating historical, literary, and religious texts dating from approximately 500 BCE to 1000 CE. Being primarily a dictionary of individual characters ( zidian 字典) and the words they represent, it also includes an abundance of alliterative and echoic binomes ( lianmianci 連綿詞) as well as accurate identifications of hundreds of plants, animals, and assorted technical terms in various fields. It aims to become the English-language resource of choice for all those seeking assistance in reading texts dating from the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty.
Previous Chinese-English dictionaries have persistently mixed together without clarification all eras and styles of Chinese. But written Chinese in its 3,000 year history has changed and evolved even more than English has in its mere millennium, with classical and medieval Chinese differing more from modern standard Chinese than the language of Beowulf or even that of Chaucer differs from modern English. This dictionary takes the user straight into the language of early and medieval texts, without the confusion of including meanings that developed only after 1000 CE. An added feature of the dictionary is its identification of meanings that were not developed and attached to individual graphs until the medieval period (approximately 250-1000 CE), setting these off where possible from earlier usages of the same graphs.
Those who have, or are acquiring, a basic understanding of classical grammar, whether approaching the language from a background either in modern Chinese or Japanese, will find it eases their labors appreciably and helps to solve countless problems of interpretation. Advanced students will find it to be the one reference work they want always close at hand.
The dictionary has an index by “radical” and stroke-number, and contains various appendices, including one with reign-eras and exact accession dates of emperors given according to both Chinese and Western calendars.

Corrections have been provided by William Baxter for some of the Middle Chinese (MC) readings in this revised edition of the dictionary. These are also reflected in the online version of the dictionary, available through chinesereferenceshelf.brillonline.com/chinese-english. They are also available in a downloadable file on this page under More Information for those who have purchased the first edition of this work.

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Michael Hunter

In Confucius Beyond the Analects, Michael Hunter challenges the standard view of the Analects as the earliest and most authoritative source of the teachings of Confucius. Arguing from a comprehensive survey of the thousands of extant sayings and stories from the early period, Hunter situates the compilation and rise of the Analects in the Western Han period (206 BCE–9 CE), roughly three centuries after the death of Confucius. As a study of the growth and development of the Confucius figure over the course of the early period, the book is also meant to serve as a roadmap for those interested in exploring the wealth and diversity of Confucius material beyond the Analects.

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Edited by Michael Dillon, Yijiu JIN and Wai Yip Ho

This important collection of articles by leading Chinese scholars of Islamic studies reflects current thinking about the past and present condition of Islam in China. It has a strong focus on China’s north-west, the most important region for the study of Islam in China. Most contributions relate to the Hui (Chinese-speaking) Muslims of Gansu and Qinghai provinces and the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region but there are also chapters on the Uyghurs of Xinjiang. An important feature of this book is the attention paid to the Sufi orders: the role of these networks, which embody an inner-directed and mystical aspect of Islam, is crucial to the understanding of Muslim communities in both historical and contemporary China.

Fire over Luoyang

A History of the Later Han Dynasty 23-220 AD

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Rafe de Crespigny

Winner of the 2017 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award
The Later Han dynasty, also known as Eastern Han, ruled China for the first two centuries of the Christian era. Comparable in extent and power to the early Roman empire, it dominated east Asia from present-day Vietnam to the Mongolian steppe.
Rafe de Crespigny presents here the first full account of this period in Chinese history to be found in a Western language. Commencing with a detailed account of the imperial capital, the history describes the nature of government, the expansion of the Chinese people to the south, the conflicts of scholars and officials with eunuchs at court, and the final collapse which followed the rebellion of the Yellow Turbans and the rise of regional warlords.

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Edited by Ildikó Bellér-Hann, Birgit N. Schlyter and Jun Sugawara

Building on the rich scholarly legacy of Gunnar Jarring, the Swedish Turkologist and diplomat, the fourteen contributions by sixteen authors representing a variety of disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences provide an insight into ongoing research trends in Uyghur and Xinjiang Studies. In one way or other all the chapters explore how new research in the fields of history, linguistics, anthropology and folklore can contribute to our understanding of Xinjiang’s past and present, simultaneously pointing to those social and knowledge practices that Uyghurs today can claim as part of their traditions in order to reproduce and perpetuate their cultural identity.
Contributors include: Ildikó Bellér-Hann, Rahile Dawut, Arienne Dwyer, Fredrik Fällman, Chris Hann, Dilmurat Mahmut, Takahiro Onuma, Alexandre Papas, Eric Schluessel, Birgit Schlyter, Joanne Smith Finley, Rune Steenberg Jun Sugawara, Äsäd Sulaiman, Abdurishid Yakup, Thierry Zarcone.

China, East Asia and the European Union

Strong Economics, Weak Politics?

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Edited by Tjalling Halbertsma and Jan van der Harst

In China, East Asia and the European Union specialist authors from both Europe and Asia reflect on the dynamic relationship between the three actors from an International Relations perspective. The book is a testimony to China’s seemingly unstoppable rise, both in the East Asian region and in the relationship with the EU and its member states. The authors investigate why the economic links between the European Union and East Asia have become so firmly established, while in comparison the political bond has remained underdeveloped. They conclude that the crises the EU is currently facing seriously affect its manoeuvring space vis-a-vis China and its neighbours, both economically and politically.


Contributors are: Ding Chun, Neil Duggan, Enrico Fardella, Frank Gaenssmantel, Tjalling Halbertsma, Daniel R Hammond, Jan van der Harst, Elisa Hörhager, Jing Jing, Werner Pascha, Sanne Kamerling, David Kerr, Silja Keva, Christopher K. Lamont, Li Junyang, Feng Liu, Maaike Okano-Heijmans, Nadya Stoynova, and Herman Voogsgeerd.

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Marielle Prins

A Grammar of rGyalrong, Jiǎomùzú (Kyom-kyo) dialects. A Web of Relations is the first full length description in English of a rGyalrong language. Marielle Prins describes the phonology, morphology and syntax for one variety of these under-researched and threatened languages. From a host of examples and texts emerges a clear picture of natural language use, creating an enduring record and a great resource for comparative and diachronic linguists. Careful analysis of the data uncovers the web of relations between individuals and all entities in their environment, to which the rGyalrong people attach great importance. The informative, clear style of writing makes this book a treasure trove for linguists as well as other interested readers.