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Edited by Theodosia Prodromou

New digital technologies offer many exciting opportunities to educators who are looking to develop better teaching practices. When technologies are new, however, the potential for beneficial and effective implementations and applications is not yet fully recognized. This book is intended to provide teachers and researchers with a wide range of ideas from researchers working to integrate the new technology of Augmented Reality into educational settings and processes. It is hoped that the research and theory presented here can support both teachers and researchers in future work with this exciting new technology.

Contributors are: Miriam Adamková, Gilles Aldon, Panayiota Anastasi, Ferdinando Arzarello, Martina Babinská, Robert Bohdal, Francisco Botana, Constadina Charalambous, Eva Csandova, Omer Deperlioglu, Monika Dillingerová, Christos Dimopoulos, Jiri Dostal, Jihad El-Sana, Michael N. Fried, Maria Fuchsová, Marianthi Grizioti, Tomas Hlava, Markus Hohenwarter, Kateřina Jančaříková, Konstantinos Katzis, Lilla Korenova, Utku Köse, Zoltán Kovács,Blanka Kožík Lehotayová, Maria Kožuchová, Chronis Kynigos, Ilona-Elefteryja Lasica, Zsolt Lavicza, Álvaro Martínez, Efstathios Mavrotheris, Katerina Mavrou, Maria Meletiou-Mavrotheris, Georgios Papaioannou, Miroslava Pirháčová Lapšanská, Stavros Pitsikalis, Corinne Raffin, Tomás Recio, Cristina Sabena, Florian Schacht, Eva Severini, Martina Siposova, Zacharoula Smyrnaiou, Nayia Stylianidou, Osama Swidan, Christos Tiniakos, Melanie Tomaschko, Renata Tothova, Christina Vasou, and Ibolya Veress-Bágyi.

Grieving as a Teacher’s Curriculum

Relevant Prose and Postscripts

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Edward Podsiadlik III

Teachers are not automatons. An educator’s personal values, concerns, and aspirations cannot be cleaved from one’s professional life without impacting the quality and relevance of the teaching experience. This book examines spaces where the personal and professional intersect, thereby deepening our understanding of the nuances and complexities of a teacher’s work. It draws readers into places of vulnerability—moments of grieving. As a teacher’s curriculum—as a curriculum of life—grief has much to teach about sympathy, compassion, and resilience.

Educational philosophy, literary analysis, and reflective practice are used to explore ways grief can help us better ascertain the scope and depth of the educators we are and have the potential to become. Pieces of literature used include works by Pat Conroy, Charles Dickens, Stephen King, Rabindranath Tagore, Virgil, Franz Wedekind, and Virginia Woolf. Also included are ideas from a diverse set of educational philosophers, social and cultural commentators, poets, and more. Chapters conclude with "Topics for Reflection" for further individual and/or collective reflection and discourse.

Educators at all stages of their careers will benefit from this study that demonstrates the impact personal grieving can have on remembering, recovering, and reidentifying with one’s mission and vision. As a resource for pre-service or veteran teachers, the text celebrates the power of introspection to transform our work, our lives, and the lives of our students. It is equally relevant for parents, coaches, mentors, and anyone who takes on the kinds of teacher roles that impact, nourish, and inspire the lives of others.

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Edited by Charbel N. El-Hani, Maurício Pietrocola, Eduardo F Mortimer and Maria Rita Otero

This volume of the World of Science Education gathers contributions from Latin American science education researchers covering a variety of topics that will be of interest to educators and researchers all around the world. The volume provides an overview of research in Latin America, and most of the chapters report findings from studies seldom available for Anglophone readers. They bring new perspectives, thus, to topics such as science teaching and learning; discourse analysis and argumentation in science education; history, philosophy and sociology of science in science teaching; and science education in non-formal settings. As the Latin American academic communities devoted to science education have been thriving for the last four decades, the volume brings an opportunity for researchers from other regions to get acquainted with the developments of their educational research. This will bring contributions to scholarly production in science education as well as to teacher education and teaching proposals to be implemented in the classroom.

Enhancing Science Learning through Learning Experiences outside School (LEOS)

How to Learn Better during Visits to Museums, Science Centers, and Science Fieldtrips

Sandhya Devi Coll and Richard K. Coll

The authors provide practical, research-informed, guidelines and detailed lesson plans that improve learning of chemical, physical, biological, and Earth & space sciences. The context for learning is the myriad of exciting opportunities provided by informal science institutions such as zoos, museums, space centers and the outdoors. Many such institutions seek to educate the public and inspire budding scientists. Visits outside school help students relate science to everyday life, providing strong motivation to learn science for all abilities. This book shows the key to making such visits effective, is when they are linked to classroom learning using a learning management system, drawing upon modern students’ fascination with digital technologies and mobile devices.

Education for Employability (Volume 2)

Learning for Future Possibilities

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Will Letts and Geoffrey Crisp

We often look back at changing trends in higher education and call them "bandwagons" (temporary fads that everyone rushes to be part of and "jump on"). While much of the hype and jargon of "The Employability Agenda" may fade from the tip of our tongues (or perhaps be subsumed into the norm) in the mid future, there are two fundamental changes that will not: the digital revolution embedded in changing work and economic practices and the “re-globalisation” of the world that this and other politico-economic changes have brought about. These will continue to be part of how we live and work, so tertiary education will need to take its part in supporting employ-ability far beyond either the timing or scope of preparation for initial employment.

Employability is important to local, national and international labour market contexts, parameters and policies. As well as impacting workforces, employability is an essential characteristic of workers. It is very important that employability is understood and enacted as personal employability not just employment of individuals. We have found that employability is defined as much, if not more, by mindset rather than skillset. Part of this mindset involves recognising the unknowns of future work and an even bigger part is recognising our responsibilities as workers and educators lies in shaping our own employability and that of the novice learners and workers in our spaces of influence and communities of practice.

In Education for Employability (Volume 2): Learning for Future Possibilities we continue on from the big agenda discussions of Education for Employability (Volume 1): The Employability Agenda to explore education for employability in a variety of spaces: in the context of higher education as an entrance into the workforce, in joining communities of practice and in the lifelong pursuit of employability – preparing people for a portfolio of careers rather than a job-for-life.

These two books show how educational leaders, educators, industry partners and thought leaders are imagining and addressing the challenges posed by the current and future changes facing our work, practices and workplaces.

Critical Collaborative Communities

Academic Writing Partnerships, Groups, and Retreats

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Edited by Nicola Simmons and Ann Singh

Writing comprises a significant proportion of academic staff members’ roles. While academics have been acculturated to the notion of ‘publish or perish,’ they often struggle to find the time to accomplish writing papers and tend to work alone. The result can be a sense of significant stress and isolation around the writing process. Writing partnerships, groups, and retreats help mitigate these challenges and provide significant positive writing experiences for their members.

Critical Collaborative Communities describes diverse examples of partnerships from writing regularly with one or two colleagues to larger groups that meet for a single day, regular writing meetings, or a retreat over several days. While these approaches bring mutual support for members, each is not without its respective challenges. Each chapter outlines an approach to writing partnerships and interrogates its strengths and limitations as well as proposes recommendations for others hoping to implement the practice. Authors in this volume describe how they have built significant trusting relationships that have helped avoid isolation and have led to their self-authorship as academic writers.

Mid-Career Faculty

Trends, Barriers, and Possibilities

Edited by Anita G. Welch, Jocelyn Bolin and Daniel Reardon

At a time when higher education institutions in the United States are the subject of increased media scrutiny and nearly continuous loss of funding by resource-strapped state legislatures, a greater understanding of higher education’s bulwark resource—mid-career research and teaching faculty—is more important than ever. Faculty at mid-career comprise the largest segment of academia. For some, this is a time of significant productivity and creativity, yet for others, it is a time of disillusionment and stagnation. Revealing impediments and pathways to faculty job satisfaction and productivity will strengthen higher education institutions by protecting, fostering, and maintaining this vital workforce. In this collection we will explore the lives of mid-career faculty as our authors uncover the complexities in this stage of professional life and discuss support systems for the transition into this period of faculties’ academic careers.

Mid-Career Faculty: Trends, Barriers, and Possibilities is designed for faculty leaders, administration, policymakers, and anyone concerned with the future of higher education. This text offers an examination into an often overlooked period of academic life, that of post-tenure mid-career faculty. Therefore, the aim of this text is to deepen our understanding of the lives of mid-career faculty, to identify barriers that impede job advancement and satisfaction, and to offer suggestions for changes to current policy and practice in higher education.

Contributors are: Joyce Alexander, Michael Bernard-Donals, Pradeep Bhardwaj, Kimberly Buch, Javier Cavazos, Jay R. Dee, Anne M. DeFelippo, Andrea Dulin, Jeremiah Fisk, Carrie Graham, Debbie L. Hahs-Vaughn, Florencio Eloy Hernandez, Yvette Huet, Jane McLeod, Jennifer McGarry, Maria L. Morales, Eliza Pavalko, Laura Plummer, Mandy Rispoli, Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw, J. Blake Scott, Michael Terwillegar, Jenna Thomas and Claudia Vela.

Developing Teachers’ Assessment Literacy

A Tapestry of Ideas and Inquiries

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Kim Koh, Cecille DePass and Sean Steel

Since the turn of the 21st century, developing teachers’ assessment literacy has been recognized as one of the key levers for improving instructional practice and student learning in light of the education reforms worldwide. A substantial body of literature is focused on teachers’ assessment literacy or teachers’ capacity in assessment, and teachers’ continuing professional development in assessment. As we approach the third decade of the 21st century, developing teachers’ assessment literacy needs to be more responsive to the need of both preservice and inservice teachers who come from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds. The authors concur that both preservice and inservice teachers in today’s complex educational contexts require a deeper level of understanding of assessment. Additionally, teachers are highly encouraged to appreciate the history of educational assessment in different sociocultural and political contexts, as well as to know how to determine the merits of a range of assessment practices best suited for their lesson planning and classroom teaching. In this book, the authors discuss significant aspects of developing teachers’ assessment literacy in different sociocultural and political contexts. Based on their respective educational backgrounds, academic experiences, and applied fields of study, each of the authors presents a critical response to the topic of assessment. Their accounts represent the complexity of the subject through a breadth and range of content and perspectives. By expanding the terms of reference regarding assessment, the authors have developed a book with a far richer panorama on assessment as a springboard for inquiry.

Career Development as a Partner in Nation Building Australia

Origins, History and Foundations for the Future

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Wendy Patton

Despite examples of vocational guidance practice being evident in Australia since the mid-1800s, there remains a spasmodic and patchwork approach to practice across the country. For decades it is a field which has been paradoxically boosted and challenged by changing economic and political agendas. Repeated international, national and State reviews emphasise the vital nature of a systemic national approach to career development, however authors repeatedly lament the lack of a sustained focus on career activity as a major national priority.

There is no broad comprehensive historical reckoning of the history of career development theory and practice in Australia since this early period. Career development theory and practice in Australia has been forged in partnership with developments in an international context. In documenting the shared history with other countries, the author significantly adds to the body of knowledge on career development as a field in Australia and internationally. The book provides new understandings about the historical development of this field of knowledge, and in particular the challenging and cyclical nature of its policy history.

Mentoring Students of Color

Naming the Politics of Race, Social Class, Gender, and Power

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Edited by Juan F. Carrillo, Danielle Parker Moore and Timothy Condor

As more students of color continue to make up our nation’s schools, finding ways to address their academic and cultural ways knowing become important issues. This book explores these intersections, by covering a variety of topics related to race, social class, and gender, all within a multiyear study of a mentoring program that is situated within U.S. K-12 schools. Furthermore, the role of power is central to the analyses as the contributors examine questions, tensions, and posit overall critical takes on mentoring. Finally, suggestions for designing critical and holistic programming are provided.

Contributors are: Shanyce L. Campbell, Juan F. Carrillo, Tim Conder, Dana Griffin, Alison LaGarry, George Noblit, Danielle Parker Moore, Esmeralda Rodriguez, and Amy Senta.