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STEM of Desire

Queer Theories and Science Education

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Edited by Will Letts and Steve Fifield

STEM of Desire: Queer Theories and Science Education locates, creates, and investigates intersections of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and queer theorizing. Manifold desires—personal, political, cultural—produce and animate STEM education. Queer theories instigate and explore (im)possibilities for knowing and being through desires normal and strange. The provocative original manuscripts in this collection draw on queer theories and allied perspectives to trace entanglements of STEM education, sex, sexuality, gender, and desire and to advance constructive critique, creative world-making, and (com)passionate advocacy. Not just another call for inclusion, this volume turns to what and how STEM education and diverse, desiring subjects might be(come) in relation to each other and the world.

STEM of Desire is the first book-length project on queering STEM education. Eighteen chapters and two poems by 27 contributors consider STEM education in schools and universities, museums and other informal learning environments, and everyday life. Subject areas include physical and life sciences, engineering, mathematics, nursing and medicine, environmental education, early childhood education, teacher education, and education standards. These queering orientations to theory, research, and practice will interest STEM teacher educators, teachers and professors, undergraduate and graduate students, scholars, policy makers, and academic libraries.

Contributors are: Jesse Bazzul, Charlotte Boulay, Francis S. Broadway, Erin A. Cech, Steve Fifield, blake m. r. flessas, Andrew Gilbert, Helene Götschel, Emily M. Gray, Kristin L. Gunckel, Joe E. Heimlich, Tommye Hutson, Kathryn L. Kirchgasler, Michelle L. Knaier, Sheri Leafgren, Will Letts, Anna MacDermut, Michael J. Reiss, Donna M. Riley, Cecilia Rodéhn, Scott Sander, Nicholas Santavicca, James Sheldon, Amy E. Slaton, Stephen Witzig, Timothy D. Zimmerman, and Adrian Zongrone.

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.

Looking Back and Living Forward

Indigenous Research Rising Up

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Edited by Jennifer Markides and Laura Forsythe

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.

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J.E. Sumerau

Imagine the terror and exhilaration of a first sexual experience in a church where you could be caught at any moment. In Cigarettes & Wine, this is where we meet an unnamed teenage narrator in a small southern town trying to make sense of their own bisexuality, gender variance, and emerging adulthood. When our narrator leaves the church, we watch their teen years unfold alongside one first love wrestling with his own sexuality and his desire for a relationship with God, and another first love seeking to find herself as she moves away from town. Through the narrator’s eyes, we also encounter a newly arrived neighbor who appears to be an all American boy, but has secrets and pain hidden behind his charming smile and athletic ability, and their oldest friend who is on the verge of romantic, artistic, and sexual transformations of her own.
Along the way, these friends confront questions about gender and sexuality, violence and substance abuse, and the intricacies of love and selfhood in the shadow of churches, families, and a small southern town in the 1990’s. Alongside academic and media portrayals that generally only acknowledge binary sexual and gender options, Cigarettes & Wine offers an illustration of non-binary sexual and gender experience, and provides a first person view of the ways the people, places, and narratives we encounter shape who we become.
While fictional, Cigarettes & Wine is loosely grounded in hundreds of formal and informal interviews with LGBTQ people in the south as well as years of research into intersections of sexualities, gender, religion, and health. Cigarettes & Wine can be read purely for pleasure or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in sexualities, gender, relationships, families, religion, the life course, narratives, the American south, identities, culture, intersectionality, and arts-based research.

Women between Submission and Freedom

An Interpretation of Social and Political Misogyny

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Huda Sharawi

Women between Submission and Freedom is a cultural, historical, and spiritual inquiry into the nature of contemporary Eastern and Western society which highlights the gender inequality plaguing contemporary Arabian culture. The author has witnessed first-hand the role of cultural influences in her religion and society. Her analysis begins with personal stories and everyday instances of misogynistic behavior suffered by herself and those around her.
The author delivers an important message about the deception and brainwashing of women in these communities. She bears witness to a culture which has taught women to be submissive and accept the fact that their societal value only exists in relation and deference to men. Whether through direct or indirect pressure, such communities reduce the innate human value of women, at the same time as the patriarchal system reduces them to virtual slavery. This systematic denigration includes not only the misogynistic mentality, but the historical suppression of women’s ideas and creations.
The author explores the portrayal of women in a range of religions that employ gender-based social intimidation under the cloak of religion. The interpretation of these verses is based on the societal values and politics of those who lead and protect the patriarchal system. To them, religion is not an ethos, but a weapon.

Feminism in Community

Adult Education for Transformation

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Leona M. English and Catherine J. Irving

Winner! 2016 Cyril O. Houle Award from the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE).
The Cyril O. Houle Award was established in 1981 to honor the scholarship and memory of Cyril O. Houle, Professor of Adult Education at the University of Chicago. It is given annually by the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) for a book published in English in the previous year that reflects universal concerns of adult educators.
About The Book
In this award-winning book, the authors draw upon their earlier research examining how feminists have negotiated identity and learning in international contexts or multisector environments. Feminism in Community focuses on feminist challenges to lead, learn, and participate in nonprofit organizations, as well as their efforts to enact feminist pedagogy through arts processes, Internet fora, and critical community engagement.
The authors bring a focused energy to the topic of women and adult learning, integrating insights of pedagogy and theory-informed practice in the fields of social movement learning, transformative learning, and community development. The social determinants of health, spirituality, research partnerships, and policy engagement are among the contexts in which such learning occurs. In drawing attention to the identity and practice of the adult educator teaching and learning with women in the community, the authors respond to gender mainstreaming processes that have obscured women as a discernible category in many areas of practice.

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Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek

Feminist Theory and Pop Culture synthesizes feminist theory with modern portrayals of gender in media culture. This comprehensive and interdisciplinary text includes an introductory chapter written by the editor as well as nine contributor chapters of original content. Included in the text:
Historical illustration of feminist theory
Application of feminist research methods for the study of gender
Feminist theoretical perspectives such as the male gaze, feminist standpoint theory, Black feminist thought, queer theory, masculinity theory, theories of feminist activism and postfeminism
Contributor chapters cover a range of topics from Western perspectives on Belly Dance classes to television shows such as GIRLS, Scandal and Orange is the New Black, as well as chapters which discuss gendered media forms like “chick lit”, comic books and Western perspectives of non-Western culture in film
Feminist theory as represented in the different waves of feminism, including a discussion of a fourth wave
Pedagogical features
Suggestions for further reading on topics covered
Discussion questions for classroom use

The Male Clock

A Futuristic Novel about a Fertility Crisis, Gender Politics, and Identity

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William Marsiglio and Kendra Siler-Marsiglio

As speculative fiction informed by social science and biomedical perspectives, The Male Clock propels readers into a futuristic, yet believable world transformed by SGEV—a debilitating virus that drastically compromises men’s ability to procreate. Set mostly in the years 2034-2042, Jordan Giordano, a prominent American journalist, navigates a world steeped in personal misfortune and public controversy. Jordan chronicles his intimate struggle to become a father and family man while doing investigative reporting related to the ever changing social landscape with its radically altered sexual politics, heated public debates, and new technologies. The troubled era is defined by its upswing in baby farming, pharma company transgressions, new S. W. A. T. -based and bioterrorism technologies, sperm retrieval companies, sperm ID cards, devices preventing wet dreams, a surge in lesbian relationships and male prostitution, sperm-donating priests, and more.
Because the novel explores the gendered dimensions to family, interpersonal relations, reproductive and public health, and identity issues it can serve as a provocative supplemental text for diverse courses in sociology, psychology, gender studies, sexualities, history, public health, and related fields. The plot should resonate with young people as well as persons thinking about or trying to have children. Ultimately, The Male Clock will compel people to question how individuals and groups cope with unwanted social change that challenges our identities and social conventions.

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Edited by Leila Gómez, Asunción Horno-Delgado, Mary K. Long and Núria Silleras-Fernández

Teaching Gender through Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Texts and Cultures provides a dynamic exploration of the subject of teaching gender and feminism through the fundamental corpus encompassing Latin American, Iberian and Latino authors and cultures from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. The four editors have created a collaborative forum for both experienced and new voices to share multiple theoretical and practical approaches to the topic. The volume is the first to bring so many areas of study and perspectives together and will serve as a tool for reassessing what it means to teach gender in our fields while providing theoretical and concrete examples of pedagogical strategies, case studies relating to in-class experiences, and suggestions for approaching gender issues that readers can experiment with in their own classrooms. The book will engage students and educators around the topic of gender within the fields of Latin American, Latino and Iberian studies, Gender and Women’s studies, Cultural Studies, English, Education, Comparative Literature, Ethnic studies and Language and Culture for Specific Purposes within Higher Education programs.

Alliances for Advancing Academic Women

Guidelines for Collaborating in STEM Fields

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Edited by Penny J. Gilmer, Berrin Tansel and Michelle Hughes Miller

This unique book provides important guidelines and examples of ways STEM (e. g., science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) faculty and administration can collaborate towards goals of recruiting, mentoring, and promoting leadership to academic women faculty. Based on the experiences of faculty across five Florida universities, including one national laboratory, each chapter highlights one aspect of a multi-institutional collaboration on an NSF ADVANCE-PAID grant dedicated to achieving these three goals.
Highlighting the importance of coordination, integration, and flexibility, each chapter details strategies and challenges of establishing a multi-site collaboration, assessing climate in STEM departments, addressing differential institutional readiness and infrastructure, and implementing change. The authors suggest ways to build on intrainstitutional strengths through interinstitutional activities, including shared workshops, research, and materials.
Separate chapters focus on recruiting women into STEM departments, mentoring women faculty, and providing leadership opportunities to women. A theoretical chapter includes Cultural historical activity theory as a lens for examining the alliances’ activities and evaluation data. Other chapters present research on women STEM faculty, contributing insights about STEM women’s sense of isolation. Chapters include a reflective metalogue written by a social scientist. The book closes with lessons learned from this collaboration.