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Education, Knowledge and Liberation for All Citizens
This book supports the formal education of all Indigenous children who live in different circumstances in different countries. It takes Indigenous philosophy as its starting point, while recognising that in many colonial and post-colonial circumstances, Indigenous knowledge, culture and language may not be valued. For this reason, Indigenous and non-Indigenous theorists and authors are included to demonstrate the recognised links between Indigenous and non-Indigenous understandings and practices of culture, knowledge and learning and therefore common approaches to formal education. Chapters are arranged in an integrated fashion to discuss contextual issues regarding global political and economic influences and the notion of what it means to participate fully in society.
The Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam appears in substantial segments each year, both online and in print. The new scope includes comprehensive coverage of Islam in the twentieth century and of Muslim minorities all over the world.
This Part 2019-6 of the Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam will contain 52 new articles, reflecting the great diversity of current scholarship in the fields of Islamic Studies.
By examining the great economic and political transformations of our time, Juan Luis Manfredi-Sánchez reveals how cities and their hinterlands have become part of globalisation. The global city has joined the group of actors who develop diplomatic, political and communicative action in a manner that is de facto and lawful. Thus, the city is involved in the formulation of foreign policy at the same time that it proposes its own political agenda, which may or may not be aligned with its own country. The city thereby becomes a source of innovation in the field of diplomacy. The Covid-19 pandemic is accelerating the political and diplomatic role of cities, which have become epicentres of prevention and response in the face of this public health crisis.
Volume Editors: Tasos Barkatsas and Patricia McLaughlin
In this book, 37 international academics illustrate how authentic assessment is an effective measure of intellectual achievement as it requires the demonstration of deep understanding and complex problem solving through the performance of exemplary tasks. By exploring the concept of authentic assessment in both tertiary and school education, the authors in these chapters argue that authentic assessment is not only the measurement of significant intellectual accomplishments but also an important pedagogical structure.

Authentic assessment is a concept more closely defined as an umbrella term that seeks to immerse learners in environments where they can gain highly practical and lifelong learning skills. Authentic assessment has been on the educational agenda for a number of years and keeps being a powerful tool for assessing students’ 21st century competencies in the context of global educational reforms.

Contributors are: Pınar Akyıldız, Fatma Nur Aktaş, Chrysoula Arcoudis, Tasos Barkatsas, Michael Belcher, Antonios Bouras, Athina Chalkiadaki, Jere Confrey, Rebecca Cooper, Yüksel Dede, Paul Denny, Zara Ersozlu, Ivan Fortunato, Linda Hobbs, Marj Horne, Fragkiskos Kalavasis, Katerina Kasimatis, Belinda Kennedy, Gillian Kidman, Huk Yuen Law, Susan Ledger, Kathy Littlewood, Jiabo Liu, Michelle Ludecke, Tricia McLaughlin, Juanjo Mena, Andreas Moutsios-Rentzos, Greg Oates, Anastasia Papadopoulou, Fabiano Pereira dos Santos, Angela Rogers, Gráinne Ryan, Rebecca Seah, Meetal Shah, Hazel Tan, Naomi Wilks-Smith, Dallas Wingrove, Qiaoping Zhang and Xiaolei Zhang.
This volume offers a Naming praxis with which teachers might more closely align with their ethical ideals in the midst of their daily practice and relationships with students. Framed ontologically in Maxine Greene’s existential-phenomenological notion of Becoming, the author explicates Greene’s Naming as a praxis within her own early teaching experiences through the interpretive methods of currere and teacher lore. This study evolves in epistolary conversation with Maxine Greene, teacher colleagues, and new teachers. It demonstrates the possibilities of applying critical reflective and discursive dialogue to the tensions of a teacher’s life of practice in order to identify the obstacles to and the opportunities of the Becoming of the teacher and the student(s) in the educational encounter.
Volume Editor: Lauren Cifuentes
The rapid rise of e-learning worldwide means that campuses are creating new positions in distance learning leadership, often at the vice-president or vice-provost level. Frequently, those applying for such positions are recently graduated doctoral students or faculty members who have never served in administration. Unlike any other book to date, this Guide to Administering Online Learning provides easy access to an overview of tasks to be accomplished or maintained and perspectives to consider in order to direct dynamic online initiatives. In it, experienced distance learning teachers and administrators share their insights regarding what must be done to administer effective online learning, including theoretical insights as well as practical principles. They provide comprehensive guidelines for addressing issues and needs that distance learning administrators currently face: barriers to adoption, policies, legalities, ethics, strategic planning, emerging technologies, design of professional development, management of the course development process, quality assurance, student support, and recruitment and marketing. This book is a timely offering from those who have effectively led distance learning initiatives for those who are interested in leading distance learning for the next generation of learners. Each chapter includes questions, prompts, or activities to help readers relate the concept to their own experiences.
Volume Editors: Jennifer Beech and Matthew Wayne Guy
As the recent pandemic illustrated, many folks are only one or two paychecks away from bankruptcy. The economic disparities made starkly clear in the wake of shutdowns have brought home the need for thinking critically about class in ways that many U.S. citizens have traditionally resisted. This collection of memoirs and cultural analyses by established and newer scholars from a variety of disciplines seeks to reintroduce class in sophisticated, yet accessible, ways so that students may increase their critical literacy and consider the power of rhetoric to fight for equitable distribution of income and class power.

Contributors are: : Sarah Attfield, Jennifer Beech, Phil Bratta, Ryan Cooper Carl, Christina V. Cedillo, José M. Cortez, William DeGenaro, David Engen, Kelli R. Gill, Abby Graves, Matthew Wayne Guy, Katherine Highfill, Nancy Mack, Heather Palmer, Irvin Peckham, Valerie Murrenus Pilmaier, Philip L. Simpson, William Thelin and Edward J. Whitelock.
Author: Hugh Morrison
At Christmas 1936, Presbyterian children in New Zealand raised over £400 for an x-ray machine in a south Chinese missionary hospital. From the early 1800s, thousands of children in the British world had engaged in similar activities, raising significant amounts of money to support missionary projects world-wide. But was money the most important thing? Hugh Morrison argues that children’s education was a more important motive and outcome. This is the first book-length attempt to bring together evidence from across a range of British contexts. In particular it focuses on children’s literature, the impact of imperialism and nationalism, and the role of emotions.
Volume Editor: Vicki Stewart Collet
This volume is a valuable reference for literacy scholars and educators. In this encyclopaedic reference of prominent literacy terms, you will find citations of theorists and research findings to validate the content and lead you into a deeper dive for those terms of particular interest. Whether read cover to cover to provide an overview of the field or used as a side-table reference, The Language of Literacy Education offers valid, current information about important topics in the field. The 297 indexed terms expand our 87 main entries to encompass relevant terms in literacy education.

Contributors are: Johnny B. Allred, Leah R. Cheek, Vicki Stewart Collet, Rebecca Carpenter de Cortina, Judy L. Fields, Seth D. French, Savanna L. Gragg, Angelia C. Greiner, Megan Yates Grizzle, Kathryn Hackett-Hill, Holly Sheppard Riesco, Afton Schleiff and Wyann Stanton.