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An Anglican Practical Theology of Interreligious Marriage
In Intimate Diversity Paul Smith explores theological implications of interreligious marriage. Taking a practical theology approach which begins with lived experience and works through a pastoral cycle involving interpretation, normative discussion and a pragmatic outcome, the book challenges the Church of England (or other denominations) fulfil three tasks: theological, pastoral and missional.

Paul Smith accepts the reality of marriage that involves couples from different religious traditions and proposes ways of justifying such marriage based on normative Christian traditions. He takes a broadly missional approach, advocating the positive role that the Church of England can play in fostering good interreligious relations in society whilst offering sympathetic pastoral support of couples who marry across religious divides.
The influence of the Bible in human history is staggering. Biblical texts have inspired grand social advancements, intellectual inquiries, and aesthetic achievements. Yet, the Bible has also given rise to hatred, violence, and oppression – often with deadly consequences. How does the Bible exert such extraordinary influence? The short answer is rhetoric. In Influence: On Rhetoric and Biblical Interpretation, Michal Beth Dinkler demonstrates that, contrary to popular opinion, rhetoric is not inherently “empty” or disingenuous. Rhetoric refers to the art of persuasion. Dinkler argues that the Bible is by nature rhetorical, and that understanding the art of persuasion is therefore vital for navigating biblical literature and its interpretation. Influence invites readers to think critically about biblical rhetoric and the rhetoric of biblical interpretation, and offers a clear and compelling guide for how to do so.
Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation
In Learning the Language of Scripture, Mark Randall James offers a new account of theological interpretation as a sapiential practice of learning the language of Scripture, drawing on recently discovered Homilies on the Psalms by the influential early theologian Origen of Alexandria (2nd-3rd c. C.E). Widely regarded as one of the most arbitrary interpreters, James shows that Origen’s appearance of arbitrariness is a result of the modern tendency to neglect the role of wisdom in scriptural interpretation. James demonstrates that Origen offers a compelling model of a Christian pragmatism in which learning and correcting linguistic practice is a site of the transformative pedagogy of the divine Logos.
Author: Abraham Smith
In this study, Abraham Smith introduces the nature, history, and interventions of two theoretical-political cultural productions: Black/Africana studies (the systematic and rigorous study of Africa and African descendants) and Black/Africana biblical studies (a biblical studies’ subfield that analyzes and appraises the strategies of reception and the historical and contemporary impact of the Christian bible for people of African descent). Both cultural productions were formally introduced in U.S. educational institutions in the late 1960s as a part of the Black Freedom movement. Both have long and deep intellectual antecedents on the one hand and ever-evolving recent interventions that challenge a narrow politics of identity on the other. Through the interrogation of keywords (such as race, family, and Hip Hop or cartographies, canons, and contexts), moreover, the study examines how these two theoretical-political projects question the settled epistemologies or prevailing intellectual currencies of their respective times.
Terror and Intrigue
In Gnostic Countercultures, fourteen scholars investigate countercultural aspects associated with the gnostic which is broadly conceived with reference to the claim to have special knowledge of the divine, which either transcends or transgresses conventional religious knowledge. The papers explore the concept of the gnostic in Western culture from the ancient world to the modern New Age. Contributors trace the emergence, persistence, and disappearance of gnostic religious currents that are perceived to be countercultural, inverted, transgressive and/or subversive in their relationship to conventional religions and their claims to knowledge. The essays represent a selection of the papers delivered at the international congress Gnostic Countercultures: Terror and Intrigue convened at Rice University, March 26-28, 2015. The essays were originally published in Gnosis 1.1-2 (2016) and are available for the first time under separate cover.
In Apostles of Revolution? Marxism and Biblical Studies Christina Petterson sheds light on the collaboration between Biblical studies and liberal ideology. Marxist analysis of the bible is spreading, but clarity about what constitutes Marxist readings and Marxist categories of analysis is lacking – a lack of clarity compounded by the different strands within Marxist politics, and its subtle resonances in biblical scholarship. The author examines the interplay between Biblical studies and liberal ideology in two ways. First, by presenting and discussing some of the central Marxist categories of analysis, namely history, ideology and class, and how these categories have been co-opted into biblical studies and in the process lost their radical edge. Second, by discussing the emergence of the discipline of biblical studies during the Enlightenment, and to what extent the containment strategies of biblical studies overlap with those of capitalism.
Author: Amy J. Erickson
Ephraim Radner, Hosean Wilderness, and the Church in the Post-Christendom West offers the first monograph-length treatment of the compelling and perplexing contemporary Anglican theologian Ephraim Radner. While unravelling his distinctive approach to biblical hermeneutics and ecclesiology, it queries the state of today's secularized church through a theological interpretation of an equally enigmatic writer: the prophet Hosea. It concludes that an eschatological posture of waiting and a heuristic of poesis should dictate the church's shape for an era in which God is stripping the church of its foregoing institutional forms.
In Latina/o/x Studies and Biblical Studies Jacqueline M. Hidalgo introduces Latina/o/x studies for a biblical studies audience. She examines crucial themes that bridge the two fields, themes such as identity and difference with special attention to ethnicity and race; migration with attention to homing, diaspora, transnationalism, and citizenship. She discusses the place of Latina/o/x studies in relevant Hebrew Bible and New Testament scholarship on these topics. Ultimately this essay argues that Latina/o/x studies’ epistemological commitments to complexity, relationality, particularity, and collaborative knowledge-making can help ground critical interpretive approaches in biblical studies. She also imagines a way in which biblical studies—capaciously encompassing the study of Jewish and Christian literature in the ancient world as well as Jewish and Christian biblical reception and rejection histories, and the very category of scriptures more broadly—could deepen Latina/o/x studies' own thinking about canon formation and history.
While postmodernism remains an ambiguous and messy phenomenon to represent, it also remains a compelling prophetic voice in the ongoing development of contemporary biblical studies. In Critical Entanglements: Postmodern Theory and Biblical Studies, Andrew P. Wilson tracks the various strands of postmodernism threaded through the discipline, drawing on a range of evocative biblical readings as well as key examples from the art world. Wilson demonstrates that the scholarly “entanglement” with postmodern theory provides a valuable critical sensibility to biblical readings, and referring to specific examples from reception history, one that has the potential to showcase biblical studies at its best. When it comes to reading practices, scholarly voices and identities, postmodern theory shows that biblical scholarship is ethically oriented and has an expansive sense of the text and textual effects. Wilson plots the distinctive ways in which postmodern theory has shaped scholarship of the bible while continuing to beckon in unanticipated ways from unexpected vantage points.
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Course adoption for this paperback is available when ordering 8 or more copies at 52 euro per copy, free shipping and one invoice. Please contact Liesbeth Hugenholtz at hugenholtz@brill.com

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Die dritte, mehrbändige Auflage des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons zum Alten Testament (HALAT) von Koehler & Baumgartner erschien zwischen 1967 und 1995. Das Werk behandelt sämtliche Lexeme aus der Hebräischen Bibel, bezieht aber auch außerbiblische Belege und antike Übersetzungen ein und bietet zudem oft ausführliche Sachdiskussionen und umfangreiche Angaben zu (seinerzeit aktueller) Fachliteratur.

Die hier vorliegende Konzise und aktualisierte Ausgabe des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons (KAHAL) basiert auf HALAT, konzentriert sich aber ganz auf die lexikographische Behandlung der biblischen Lexeme. Die etymologischen Einträge sind auf dem Stand der gegenwärtigen Semitistik neu erarbeitet. Eigennamen werden ohne Etymologie, aber in Umschrift aufgeführt.

Mit KAHAL wird Fachleuten wie Studierenden der Theologie und benachbarter Disziplinen ein handliches und aufdatiertes Hilfsmittel zum Studium der Hebräischen Bibel an die Hand gegeben.

Verantwortlich für die Etymologien sind folgende Wissenschaftler:
Prof. Dr. Manfried Dietrich (Universität Münster),
Juniorprofessor Dr. des. Viktor Golinets (Universität Basel/Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg),
Prof. Dr. Regine Hunziker-Rodewald (Université de Strasbourg),
Dr. Dirk Schwiderski (Universität Heidelberg).


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The third edition of Hebräisches und Aramäisches Lexikon zum Alten Testament (HALAT) by Koehler & Baumgartner appeared in a series of fascicles between 1967 and 1995. It deals with the lexemes of the whole Hebrew Bible, and includes citations from extra-biblical sources and the ancient versions as well as much discussion of the secondary literature then available.

The Konzise und aktualisierte Ausgabe des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons (KAHAL) is based on HALAT but it focuses on the lexicographic treatment of the biblical lexemes. The etymological material has been revised to reflect the current status of studies in comparative Semitic philology. Proper names are all now transcribed but without any proposed etymologies.

KAHAL offers scholars and students of the Hebrew Bible and theology a handy and up-to-date work of reference.

The following scholars are responsible for the etymologies:
Prof. Dr. Manfried Dietrich (Universität Münster),
Juniorprofessor Dr. des. Viktor Golinets (Universität Basel/Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg),
Prof. Dr. Regine Hunziker-Rodewald (Université de Strasbourg),
Dr. Dirk Schwiderski (Universität Heidelberg).