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Der Tod der schönen Antike
1862 erscheint Gustave Flauberts Roman Salammbô. Ort und Handlung sind in ferner Vergangenheit angesiedelt. Karthago ist ein blinder Fleck auf der Landkarte der historischen Überlieferung. Gerade deswegen wählt Flaubert diese Stadt.
Nordafrikanische Landschaften, Stadtansichten der Seerepublik Karthago, pompöser Reichtum und kulturelle Artifizialität in Speisen, Sitten und Kleidung, monumentale Schlachten, grausame Bilder des Krieges und der ausschweifenden Gewalt an Mensch und Tier bilden die Szenen des neuen Romans. »Leute von schlechtem Geschmack« sind nach Flaubert solche, die »verschönern, reinigen und sich illusionieren, die verändern, kratzen und wegnehmen« und gleichwohl meinen, sie seien Klassiker. Die Aufsprengung der normativen Antike-Ansicht bedeutet für Flaubert, Klischees und abgenutzte Phrasen aufzubrechen sowie neue Sprachformen zu erfinden. Er eröffnet damit den Blick auf eine archaische Antike und auf das Phänomen der Gewalt in der Moderne.
Volume Editors: Tasos Barkatsas and Patricia McLaughlin
In this book, 37 international academics illustrate how authentic assessment is an effective measure of intellectual achievement as it requires the demonstration of deep understanding and complex problem solving through the performance of exemplary tasks. By exploring the concept of authentic assessment in both tertiary and school education, the authors in these chapters argue that authentic assessment is not only the measurement of significant intellectual accomplishments but also an important pedagogical structure.

Authentic assessment is a concept more closely defined as an umbrella term that seeks to immerse learners in environments where they can gain highly practical and lifelong learning skills. Authentic assessment has been on the educational agenda for a number of years and keeps being a powerful tool for assessing students’ 21st century competencies in the context of global educational reforms.

Contributors are: Pınar Akyıldız, Fatma Nur Aktaş, Chrysoula Arcoudis, Tasos Barkatsas, Michael Belcher, Antonios Bouras, Athina Chalkiadaki, Jere Confrey, Rebecca Cooper, Yüksel Dede, Paul Denny, Zara Ersozlu, Ivan Fortunato, Linda Hobbs, Marj Horne, Fragkiskos Kalavasis, Katerina Kasimatis, Belinda Kennedy, Gillian Kidman, Huk Yuen Law, Susan Ledger, Kathy Littlewood, Jiabo Liu, Michelle Ludecke, Tricia McLaughlin, Juanjo Mena, Andreas Moutsios-Rentzos, Greg Oates, Anastasia Papadopoulou, Fabiano Pereira dos Santos, Angela Rogers, Gráinne Ryan, Rebecca Seah, Meetal Shah, Hazel Tan, Naomi Wilks-Smith, Dallas Wingrove, Qiaoping Zhang and Xiaolei Zhang.
K-8 Lesson Plans for Ecological and Social Change
Eco-Mathematics Education strives to show how everyone can experience the embedded connection between mathematics and the natural world. The authors’ sincere hope is that by doing so, we can radically change the way we come to understand mathematics, as well as humanity’s place in the ecosystem. The book hopes to accomplish this by providing in-depth lesson plans and resources for educators and anyone interested in teaching and learning mathematics through an ecological aesthetic perspective. All lessons are based on the inquiry method of teaching, aligned to standards, incorporate art projects inspired by famous artists, and utilize recycled and/or natural materials as much as possible.
This volume offers a Naming praxis with which teachers might more closely align with their ethical ideals in the midst of their daily practice and relationships with students. Framed ontologically in Maxine Greene’s existential-phenomenological notion of Becoming, the author explicates Greene’s Naming as a praxis within her own early teaching experiences through the interpretive methods of currere and teacher lore. This study evolves in epistolary conversation with Maxine Greene, teacher colleagues, and new teachers. It demonstrates the possibilities of applying critical reflective and discursive dialogue to the tensions of a teacher’s life of practice in order to identify the obstacles to and the opportunities of the Becoming of the teacher and the student(s) in the educational encounter.
Selected Papers of Mark Olssen
Author: Mark Olssen
Inspired by the writings of Michel Foucault, Olssen’s writings traverse philosophy, politics, education, and epistemology. This book comprises a selection of his papers published in academic journals and books over twenty-five years. Taken as a whole, the papers represent a redirection of the core axioms and directions of western ontology and philosophy in relation to how history, the subject, and education are theorised within the western philosophical tradition. Olssen’s writings not only contain a powerful critique and revision of western liberalism from a poststructuralist perspective, they both explicate and extend Michel Foucault’s challenge to the core axioms and assumptions underpinning western thought. As Stephen Ball suggests in his Foreword to this volume, “Olssen uses Foucault to explore issues… Olssen’s Foucault is not a lonely nihilist but a troubled provocateur who encourages in us toward the political project of self-formation – our relation to ourselves and always, to others."
Volume Editors: Jennifer Beech and Matthew Wayne Guy
As the recent pandemic illustrated, many folks are only one or two paychecks away from bankruptcy. The economic disparities made starkly clear in the wake of shutdowns have brought home the need for thinking critically about class in ways that many U.S. citizens have traditionally resisted. This collection of memoirs and cultural analyses by established and newer scholars from a variety of disciplines seeks to reintroduce class in sophisticated, yet accessible, ways so that students may increase their critical literacy and consider the power of rhetoric to fight for equitable distribution of income and class power.
Volume Editors: Radhika Iyengar and Christina T. Kwauk
The global education community, guided for decades by the concept of Education for Sustainable Development, has done little to support the radical transformation of education systems needed to respond to climate change. Part of this inertia rests in five roadblocks to quality education identified in a Brookings report, and about which stakeholders from the fields of ESD, GCED, GE, and HR education came together in April 2020 to begin discussing ways of addressing.

This edited volume picks up that conversation by laying out elements of a shared vision, or roadmap, for the global education sector in climate action. The volume includes perspectives that span multiple continents, disciplines, and positionalities within the education system – from policymakers to teachers to youth. It curates exiting literature, surfaces in-depth case studies, and presents overviews of conceptual frameworks on a diverse range of topics relating to systems transformation, monitoring and accountability mechanisms, lessons from the field, teacher support, as well as activism and advocacy by students.

Curriculum and Learning for Climate Action: Toward an SDG 4.7 Roadmap for Systems Change offers researchers, practitioners, donors, and decisionmakers insights into entry points for education systems change needed to reorient our relationship with our planetary systems.
Volume Editor: Lauren Cifuentes
The rapid rise of e-learning worldwide means that campuses are creating new positions in distance learning leadership, often at the vice-president or vice-provost level. Frequently, those applying for such positions are recently graduated doctoral students or faculty members who have never served in administration. Unlike any other book to date, this Guide to Administering Online Learning provides easy access to an overview of tasks to be accomplished or maintained and perspectives to consider in order to direct dynamic online initiatives. In it, experienced distance learning teachers and administrators share their insights regarding what must be done to administer effective online learning, including theoretical insights as well as practical principles. They provide comprehensive guidelines for addressing issues and needs that distance learning administrators currently face: barriers to adoption, policies, legalities, ethics, strategic planning, emerging technologies, design of professional development, management of the course development process, quality assurance, student support, and recruitment and marketing. This book is a timely offering from those who have effectively led distance learning initiatives for those who are interested in leading distance learning for the next generation of learners. Each chapter includes questions, prompts, or activities to help readers relate the concept to their own experiences.
Author: Nancy A. Wasser
“I just cannot write” or “I am not a good writer” are familiar complaints from students in academia. Many of them claim they cannot express themselves clearly in written text, and their lack of this skill impedes them in their academic career. In this book, Nancy A. Wasser argues that teachers can help solve this when they start viewing writing not as secondary to reading, but as the equally important side of the same coin. Those who cannot read, will not be able to write.

Wasser explains how teaching and regular practicing of writing skills from an early age onwards helps children grow into students who are self-aware of their voices. By employing narrative as a process of learning to write and a way to read, teachers can teach children the art of writing, while also making children more aware of their own constructions of narrative. Combining the focus on individual and group expression in writing lessons, students can trace and reflect on their own life transformations through their writing process.

Good writers are not born that way, but made through effort and practice. Changes in curriculum may not only lead to better-expressed citizens, but also to more balance between teacher and children voices.
Author: Patricia Leavy
Tess Lee is a world-famous novelist. Her inspirational books explore people’s innermost struggles and the human need to believe that there is light at the end of the tunnel. Jack Miller is a former federal agent. After spending decades immersed in a violent world, a residue remains. The night Tess and Jack met, their connection was palpable. She examined the scars on his body and said, “I’ve never seen anyone whose outsides match my insides.” The two embarked on an epic love story. Now in their fourth, blissful year of marriage, one catastrophic event will change everything and push their relationship to the brink. Can Tess move through this new trauma? Will Jack’s need for vengeance destroy their relationship? When trust is violated, can there be forgiveness? In order to find their way through to the end, Tess and Jack will need to go back to the beginning.

Supernova is a novel about walking through our past traumas, moving from darkness to light, and the ways in which love—from lovers, friends, or the art we experience—heals us and helps us learn to forgive ourselves and others. Written as unfolding action, Supernova is a poignant novel that moves fluidly between melancholy, humor, and joy. It can be read entirely for pleasure, selected for book clubs, or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in communication, psychology, social work, sociology, or women’s studies/gender studies.