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Edited by Theodosia Prodromou

New digital technologies offer many exciting opportunities to educators who are looking to develop better teaching practices. When technologies are new, however, the potential for beneficial and effective implementations and applications is not yet fully recognized. This book is intended to provide teachers and researchers with a wide range of ideas from researchers working to integrate the new technology of Augmented Reality into educational settings and processes. It is hoped that the research and theory presented here can support both teachers and researchers in future work with this exciting new technology.

Contributors are: Miriam Adamková, Gilles Aldon, Panayiota Anastasi, Ferdinando Arzarello, Martina Babinská, Zuzana Berger Haladova, Robert Bohdal, Francisco Botana, Constadina Charalambous, Eva Csandová, Omer Deperlioglu, Monika Dillingerová, Christos Dimopoulos, Jiří Dostál, Jihad EL-Sana, Andrej Ferko, Michael N. Fried, Marian Fuchsová, Marianthi Grizioti, Tomáš Hlava, Markus Hohenwarter, Kateřina Jančaříková, Konstantinos Katzis, Lilla Korenova, Utku Köse, Dušan Kostrub, Zoltán Kovács, Blanka Kožík Lehotayová, Maria Kožuchová, Chronis Kynigos, Ilona-Elefteryja Lasica, Zsolt Lavicza, Álvaro Martínez, Efstathios Mavrotheris, Katerina Mavrou, Maria Meletiou-Mavrotheris, Peter Ostradicky, Georgios Papaioannou, Miroslava Pirhacova Lapsanska, Stavros Pitsikalis, Corinne Raffin, Tomás Recio, Cristina Sabena, Florian Schacht, Eva Severini, Martina Šipošová, Zacharoula Smyrnaiou, Nayia Stylianidou, Osama Swidan, Christos Tiniakos, Melanie Tomaschko, Renata Tothova, Christina Vasou, and Ibolya Veress-Bagyi.

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Patricia Leavy

Film follows three women who moved to Los Angeles to pursue their dreams. Tash Daniels aspires to be a filmmaker. Her short film was rejected from festivals, she has a stack of rejected grant proposals, and she lost her internship at a studio when her boss harassed her, forcing her to take a job as a personal shopper. Lu K is a hot deejay slowly working her way up the club scene, but no one is doing her any favors. Fiercely independent, she’s at a loss when she meets Paisley, a woman who captures her heart. Monroe Preston is the glamorous wife of a Hollywood studio head. As a teenager she moved to LA in search of a “big” life, but now she wonders if reality measures up to fantasy. When a man in their circle finds sudden fame, each of these women is catapulted on a journey of self-discovery. As the characters’ stories unfold, each is forced to confront how her past has shaped her fears and to choose how she wants to live in the present. Film is a novel about the underside of dreams, the struggle to find internal strength, the power of art, and what it truly means to live a “big” life. Frequently shown bathed in the glow of the silver screen, the characters in Film show us how the arts can reignite the light within. With a tribute to popular culture, set against the backdrop of Tinseltown, Film celebrates how the art we make and consume can shape our stories, scene by scene. Although fictional, Film is loosely grounded in interview research. It can be read entirely for pleasure or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in women’s studies/gender studies, sociology, psychology, communication, popular culture, media studies, or qualitative inquiry. Film can be read as a stand-alone novel or as a sequel to the bestselling novel, Blue.

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Edited by Becky Shelley, Kitty te Riele, Natalie Brown and Tess Crellin

The transformative power of education is widely recognised. Yet, harnessing the transformative power of education is complex for exactly those people and communities who would benefit the most. Much scholarship is available describing the ways in which educational access, opportunity and outcomes are unequally distributed; and much scholarship is dedicated to analysing and critiquing the ‘problems’ of education.

This volume gratefully builds on such analysis, to take a more constructive stance: examining how to better enable education to fulfil its promise of transforming lives.

Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education returns overall to a broader language of educational change rather than reduce our sense of scale and scope of ‘transformation’ to what might be measured in or by schools. It offers a series of practical, local but system wide and socially responsible practices, policies and analyses to support the ways that education can work at its best. The projects described here vary in scale and scope but are rooted in a wider sense of community and social responsibility so that education is considered as a necessary sustainable process to ensure productive futures for all.

Its contributors include not only scholars, but also professional experts and young people. The book’s aim is to share and advance authentic possibilities for enabling all children and young people to flourish through the transformative power of education.

Edited by Cynthia Nicol, Jo-ann Archibald Q’um Q’um Xii, Florence Glanfield and A. J. Sandy Dawson

Living Culturally Responsive Mathematics Education with/in Indigenous Communities explores challenges and possibilities across international contexts, involving Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars, teachers and Elders responding to calls for improved education for all Indigenous students. Authors from Australia, New Zealand, United States, Micronesia, and Canada explore the nature of culturally responsive mathematics education. Chapters highlight the importance of relationships with communities and the land, each engaging critically with ideas of culturally responsive education, exploring what this stance might mean and how it is lived in local contexts within global conversations. Education researchers and teacher educators will find a living pathway where scholars, educators, youth and community members critically take-up culturally responsive teachings and the possibilities and challenges that arise along the journey.

Contributors are: Dayle Anderson, Dora Andre-Ihrke, Jo-ann Archibald Q'um Q'um Xiiem, Maria Jose Athie-Martinez, Robin Averill, Trevor Bills, Beatriz A. Camacho, A. J. (Sandy) Dawson, Dwayne Donald, Herewini Easton, Tauvela Fale, Amanda Fritzlan, Florence Glanfield, Jodie Hunter, Roberta Hunter, Newell Margaret Johnson, Julie Kaomea, Robyn Jorgensen, Jerry Lipka, Lisa Lunney Borden, Dora Miura, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Cynthia Nicol, Gladys Sterenberg, Marama Taiwhati, Pania Te Maro, Jennifer S. Thom, David Wagner, Evelyn Yanez, and Joanne Yovanovich.

Power and Possibility

Adult Education in a Diverse and Complex World

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Edited by Fergal Finnegan and Bernie Grummell

Power has been a defining and constitutive theme of adult education scholarship for over a century and is a central concern of many of the most famous and influential thinkers in the field. Adult education has been particularly interested in how an analysis of power can be used to support transformative learning and democratic participation. In a fragile and interdependent world these questions are more important than ever. The aim of this collection is to offer an analysis of power and possibility in adult education which acknowledges, analyses and responds to the complexity and diversity that characterises contemporary education and society.

Power and Possibility: Adult Education in a Diverse and Complex World explores the topic of power and possibility theoretically, historically and practically through a range of perspectives and in relation to varied areas of interest within contemporary adult education. It is concerned with addressing how power works in and through adult education today by exploring what has changed in recent years and what is shaping and driving policy. Alongside this the book explores ways of theorising learning, power and transformation that builds and extends adult education philosophy. In particular it takes up the themes of diversity and solidarity exploring barriers and possibilities for change.

Artistic Mentoring as a Decolonizing Methodology

A Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists Pedro Rafael González Chavajay and Paula Nicho Cúmez

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Kryssi Staikidis

To expand the possibilities of “doing arts thinking” from a non-Eurocentric view, Artistic Mentoring as a Decolonizing Methodology: A Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists Pedro Rafael González Chavajay and Paula Nicho Cúmez is grounded in Indigenous perspectives on arts practice, arts research, and art education. Mentored in painting for eighteen years by two Guatemalan Maya artists, Kryssi Staikidis, a North American painter and art education professor, uses both Indigenous and decolonizing methodologies, which involve respectful collaboration, and continuously reexamines her positions as student, artist, and ethnographer searching to redefine and transform the roles of the artist as mentor, historian/activist, ethnographer, and teacher.

The primary purpose of the book is to illuminate the Maya artists as mentors, the collaborative and holistic processes underlying their painting, and the teaching and insights from their studios. These include Imagined Realism, a process excluding rendering from observation, and the fusion of pedagogy and curriculum into a holistic paradigm of decentralized teaching, negotiated curriculum, personal and cultural narrative as thematic content, and the surrounding visual culture and community as text.

The Maya artist as cultural historian creates paintings as platforms of protest and vehicles of cultural transmission, for example, genocide witnessed in paintings as historical evidence. The mentored artist as ethnographer cedes the traditional ethnographic authority of the colonizing stance to the Indigenous expert as partner and mentor, and under this mentorship analyzes its possibilities as decolonizing arts-based qualitative inquiry. For the teacher, Maya world views broaden and integrate arts practice and arts research, inaugurating possibilities to transform arts education.

Edited by Kirill Dmitriev, Julia Hauser and Bilal Orfali

Insatiable Appetite: Food as Cultural Signifier in the Middle East and Beyond explores the cultural ramifications of food and foodways in the Mediterranean, and Arab-Muslim countries in particular. The volume addresses the cultural meanings of food from a wider chronological scope, from antiquity to present, adopting approaches from various disciplines, including classical Greek philology, Arabic literature, Islamic studies, anthropology, and history. The contributions to the book are structured around six thematic parts, ranging in focus from social status to religious prohibitions, gender issues, intoxicants, vegetarianism, and management of scarcity.

Educating Media Literacy

The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education

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Allison T. Butler

Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.

Engaging Learners with Semiotics

Lessons Learned from Reading the Signs

Ruth Gannon-Cook and Kathryn Ley

Semiotics has explained the cognitive mechanisms of a complex, subtle and important phenomenon affecting all human interactions and communications across socio-cultural, socio-economic groups. Semiotics has captured a durable and enriching functionality from multiple disciplines including psychology, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, marketing and their multidisciplinary off-spring, such as, educational psychology, consumer psychology, visual literacy, media studies, etc. Semiotic treatises have explored critical factors affecting the relationship between any intended message and the message recipient’s interpretation. The factors that shape interpretation inherently affect learning and often directly affect learner engagement with the content. Learning environments have been culturally-laden communication experiences which academics, largely segmented by discipline, have described but often cloaked in semiotic jargon.

Each chapter integrates example after example of semiotics in everyday activities and events, such as stories, graphics, movies, games, infographics, and educational strategies. The chapters also present the most salient semiotic features for learning environments. The book describes semiotics as a communications phenomenon with practical implications for educators to enhance courses and programs with semiotic features in any educational environment but especially in mediated e-learning environments.

Enhancing Science Learning through Learning Experiences outside School (LEOS)

How to Learn Better during Visits to Museums, Science Centers, and Science Fieldtrips

Sandhya Devi Coll and Richard K. Coll

The authors provide practical, research-informed, guidelines and detailed lesson plans that improve learning of chemical, physical, biological, and Earth & space sciences. The context for learning is the myriad of exciting opportunities provided by informal science institutions such as zoos, museums, space centers and the outdoors. Many such institutions seek to educate the public and inspire budding scientists. Visits outside school help students relate science to everyday life, providing strong motivation to learn science for all abilities. This book shows the key to making such visits effective, is when they are linked to classroom learning using a learning management system, drawing upon modern students’ fascination with digital technologies and mobile devices.