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Crossing Frontiers

Cultural Exchange and Conflict

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Edited by Barbara Burns and Joy Charnley

This volume brings together two very popular and active research fields: Swiss Studies and Intercultural Studies. It includes contributions on the movement of ideas, literatures, and individuals from one culture to another or one language to another, and the ways in which they have been either assimilated or questioned. All of the writers explore this general theme; some come from a literary angle, some look at linguistic inventiveness and translation, whilst others study the problems faced when crossing geographical and cultural borders or presenting ideas which do not ‘travel’ well. By emphasising the connections, borrowings and mutual influences between Switzerland and other countries such as Germany, Hungary, France, the UK, and the Americas, the articles reaffirm the importance for Switzerland of intellectual openness and cultural exchange.

Exiles, Emigrés and Intermediaries

Anglo-Italian Cultural Transactions

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Edited by Barbara Schaff

This volume explores the dynamic and productive cultural forces engendered by exiles, wanderers, and diasporic communities in Britain and Italy over more than five centuries. It investigates the historic resonance of transnational encounters and movements between two European cultures that look back on a long history of cross-fertilisation. Drawn from a range of academic disciplines including literary studies, history, musicology, art history and bibliography, it presents the ways in which exiles, émigrés, intermediaries and their attendant cultural perspectives interact with the sometimes repressive, sometimes productive religious or political systems and ideologies that they encounter. This volume pays tribute to the stimulating exchange, circulation, and appropriation that has occurred between Britain and Italy, showing that the condition of displacement can lead not only to the articulation of loss and grief, but also to fruitful forms of interaction.

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Edited by Jason Harding

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. This series of International Ford Madox Ford Studies was founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in him. Each volume is based upon a particular theme or issue; and relates aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time.
Modernist periodicals and editorial theory have been very productive areas in recent research. This volume focuses on Ford and editing. Ford was one of the greatest editors of Modernist magazines. He founded the English Review in Edwardian London, publishing Henry James, Joseph Conrad, H. G. Wells, Ezra Pound, Wyndham Lewis, and D. H. Lawrence. His editorial relationships with all of these writers are examined in detail here, as are those with Jean Rhys, Ernest Hemingway, and Basil Bunting, connected with the transatlantic review launched by Ford in post-war Paris, which also carried experimental work by James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, and Tristan Tzara.
These seventeen essays bring together distinguished scholars and poets, as well as younger experts on Modernism and its magazine culture. This collection provides a wealth of new research on the management, cultural politics, and editorial stance of Ford’s magazines; on the impact of his editorial contacts on his own and others’ work; and on editorial approaches to his writing, including his best-known novels, The Good Soldier and Parade’s End.

Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma

The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering

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Edited by Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben

This collection constitutes the first volume in Rodopi’s Neo-Victorian Series, which explores the prevalent but often problematic re-vision of the long nineteenth century in contemporary culture. Here is presented for the first time an extended analysis of the conjunction of neo-Victorian fiction and trauma discourse, highlighting the significant interventions in collective memory staged by the belated aesthetic working-through of historical catastrophes, as well as their lingering traces in the present. The neo-Victorian’s privileging of marginalised voices and its contestation of master-narratives of historical progress construct a patchwork of competing but equally legitimate versions of the past, highlighting on-going crises of existential extremity, truth and meaning, nationhood and subjectivity. This volume will be of interest to both researchers and students of the growing field of neo-Victorian studies, as well as scholars in memory studies, trauma theory, ethics, and heritage studies. It interrogates the ideological processes of commemoration and forgetting and queries how the suffering of cultural and temporal others should best be represented, so as to resist the temptations of exploitative appropriation and voyeuristic spectacle. Such precarious negotiations foreground a central paradox: the ethical imperative to bear after-witness to history’s silenced victims in the face of the potential unrepresentability of extreme suffering.

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Edited by Christine Baron and Manfred Engel

Modernist literature and art have been dominated by a disinterest in mere empirical and social reality and a discontent with habitualized perception and the world-view of convention, reason, and pragmatism. This anti-realistic attitude originated in the epistemological scepticism of the early 20th century which was even radicalized by the advent of the »linguistic turn«, constructivism, postmodernism, and poststructuralism. Yet it would be a gross simplification to describe the 20th century flatly and globally as an age of anti-realism. Especially in its second half many neo-realist movements were launched, and non-Western literatures (e.g. »magic realism«) challenged Western modernity and its constructivist epistemology. Today, we can not only read many texts which might be attributed to a »postmodernist realism« but may even be watching the rise of a post-postmodernist realism.
This vast field of research is discussed in a series of theoretical reflections and case studies of selected texts, movies and the internet which geographically embrace Europe, the USA, Africa and Asia. The volume may be of interest for students and scholars of Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, and Media Studies as well as for students and experts in the cultures, authors and artists that are covered in the collection of essays.

A Recipe for Discourse

Perspectives on Like Water for Chocolate

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Edited by Eric Skipper

Slender and yet panoramic in scope, historical and yet relevant to current-day concerns, Laura Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate has provoked from the outset a divergent range of critical opinions. The essays in A Recipe for Discourse: Perspectives on Like Water for Chocolate represent the novel’s problematic nature in their many diverse approaches, perspectives that are certain to awaken in the reader new ways of approaching the text while challenging old ones. This volume’s ‘dialogue’ format, in which essays are grouped thematically, is particularly effective in presenting such a diverse range of viewpoints. The reader will find herein lively discussion on LWFC as it relates to such themes as gastronomy, superstition, mythology, folklore, the Mexican Revolution, magical realism, female identity, alteration, and matriarchy/ patriarchy. It is the editor’s hope that a diverse readership, from undergraduate students to seasoned scholars, will find this volume engaging and enlightening.

Rive Gauche

Paris as a Site of Avant-Garde Art and Cultural Exchange in the 1920s

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Edited by Elke Mettinger, Margarete Rubik and Jörg Türschmann

From the late 19th century onwards Paris had been a congenial locus for bohemian life. By 1920 Montparnasse had superseded Montmartre as the intellectual and artistic heart of the city, inaugurating a decade of unequalled creative achievement and innovative self-performance. These were the years of the ‘Roaring Twenties’ or années folles. “Paris” – as Gertrude Stein famously remarked – “was where the twentieth century was”. The Rive Gauche offered a carnivalesque atmosphere of liberality, where the manifold experiments of the avant-garde could breathe freely.
This volume attempts to do justice to the polyphony of voices and points up the synergies that existed between the creative activities of writers, painters, publishers, photographers and film-makers. The contributors adopt interdisciplinary approaches, casting new light on the rich and diverse artistic world of Paris in the twenties as presented in lesser known works by French artists, English and American expatriates, but also Belgian, Dutch, German, Polish or South American avant-gardists. The collection thus gives the reader a fascinating insight into artistic productions which have hitherto received comparatively little critical attention.

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Edited by Joselyn M. Almeida

In Romanticism and the Anglo-Hispanic Imaginary, the authors assess British Romanticism’s creative and polemical engagements with the Peninsular War, the bid of Spanish American colonies to establish independence with British support, and the impact of travel narratives about Spain and the Americas. The essays analyze questions of language and translation in Anglo-Hispanic literary genealogies, the representation of war and nationalism in poetry, drama, and prose, and the confluence of empire, gender, and authorship in travel narratives. Scholars and students of Romanticism will find in-depth explorations of the relationship between Britain, Spain, and Latin America during the Napoleonic era and its afterlife in cultural memory.

The Secular Visionaries

Aestheticism and New Zealand Short Fiction in the Twentieth Century

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Joel Gwynne

This retrospective study examines short fiction in the context of stylistic tradition in New Zealand’s literary history. By exploring the extent to which the major exponents of twentieth-century short fiction extend the traditions of realism and impressionism as initiated by Katherine Mansfield and Frank Sargeson, this study embraces the stylistic diversity of twentieth-century New Zealand short fiction in both Pakeha and Maori traditions.

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Edited by Debra L. Cumberland

Willa Cather’s The Song of the Lark, the latest in Rodopi’s Dialogue Series, is a collection of thirteen new essays exploring Cather’s 1915 classic novel about the coming-of-age of Thea Kronborg, a gifted young opera singer. As in previous editions in the Dialogue series, this volume on Cather’s novel offers analyses by both new and emerging scholars on complex and controversial issues. Specific areas of focus include: the role of the West and the railroad, race and race relations, the performing arts, as well as Cather’s complex construction of “culture” throughout the novel. Thea’s role as a possible feminist icon receives a fresh, insightful look, while other writers explore the nature of gift and gift-giving as well as the novel’s relation to other literary movements and genres. Scholars and the general public will welcome the ways these new critical insights offer a fresh look at this modern classic.