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A Greek and Arabic Lexicon (GALex)

Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Fascicle 14, ب to بين

Series:

Edited by Gerhard Endress and Dimitri Gutas

From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations.

A Greek and Arabic Lexicon (GALex)

Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Fascicle 13, بيت TO بين

Series:

Edited by Gerhard Endress and Dimitri Gutas

From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations.

Series:

Edited by Antonis Tsakmakis and Antonios Rengakos

This volume on Thucydides, the most important historian of the ancient world, comprises articles by thirty leading international scholars.
The contributions cover a wide range of issues, including Thucydides’ life, intellectual milieu and predecessors, Thucydides and the act of writing, his rhetoric, historical method and narrative techniques, narrative unity in the History, the speeches, Thucydides’ reliability as a historian, and his legacy through the centuries. Other topics dealt with include warfare, religion, individuals, democracy and oligarchy, the invention of political science, Thucydides and Athens, Sparta, Macedonia/Thrace, Sicily/South Italy, Persia, and the Argives.
The volume aims to provide a survey of current trends in Thucydidean studies which will be of interest to all students of ancient history.

Brill's Companion to Thucydides was awarded Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2007 .

Judean Antiquities Books 1-4

Translation and Commentary

Louis Feldman

Flavius Josephus is without a doubt the most important witness to ancient Judaism from the close of the biblical period to the aftermath of the destruction of the temple in 70 CE. His four surviving works--- Judean War, Judean Antiquities, Life, and Against Apion---provide the narrative structure for interpreting the other, more fragmentary written sources and physical remains from this period. His descriptions of the Temple, the Judean countryside, Jewish-Roman relations and conflicts, and groups and institutions of ancient Judea have become indispensable for the student of early Judaism, the Classicist, and the reader of the New Testament alike.
The priestly aristocrat Josephus was born in 37 CE and died around the year 100. After fighting against the Romans in the war of 66-74 and surrendering in the earliest phase of the campaign, he moved to Rome where he began a productive literary career. His four surviving works in thirty Greek volumes are widely excerpted for historical purposes, but still not often read in their literary and historical contexts. This project aims to assist every serious reader of Josephus by providing a new literal translation, along with a commentary suggesting literary and historical connections.

Please note that Judean Antiquities Books 1-4 is also available in hardback, ISBN 90 04 10679 0 (still available)

Edited by Gareth L. Schmeling

From classics and history to Jewish rabbinic narratives and the canonical and noncanonical gospels of earliest Christianity, the relevance of studying the novel of the later classical periods of Greek and Rome is widely endorsed. Ancient novels contain insights beyond literary theories and philosophical musings to new sources for understanding the popular culture of antiquity. Some scholars, in fact, refer to ancient novels as “alternative histories,” for they tell history implicitly rather than with the intentional biases of the historian. The Novel in the Ancient World surveys the new approaches and insights to the ancient novel and wrestles with issues such as the development, transformation, and christianization of the novel (Spirit-inspired versus inspired by the Muses).

This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.

Recreating Ancient History

Episodes from the Greek and Roman Past in the Arts and Literature of the Early Modern Period

Karl A. E.. Enenkel, Jan de Jong and Jeanine de Landtsheer

The papers in this volume offer examples of how historians, writers, playwrights, and painters in the early modern period used ancient history as a rich field of raw material that could be used, recycled, and adapted to new needs and purposes. They focused on classical antiquity as a source from which they could recreate the past as a way of understanding and legitimizing the present. The contributors to this volume have addressed a number of important, common issues that span a wide range of subjects from fifteenth-century Italian painting to the teaching of Greek history in eighteenth-century Germany. This volume is of interest for historians of the early modern period from all disciplines and for all those interested in the reception of classical antiquity.


This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.

Series:

Edited by David Frankfurter

This volume deals with the origins and rise of Christian pilgrimage cults in late antique Egypt. Part One covers the major theoretical issues in the study of Coptic pilgrimage, such as sacred landscape and shrines' catchment areas, while Part Two examines native Egyptian and Egyptian Jewish pilgrimage practices. Part Three investigates six major shrines, from Philae's diverse non-Christian devotees to the great pilgrim center of Abu Mina and a Thecla shrine on its route. Part Four looks at such diverse pilgrims' rites as oracles, chant, and stational liturgy, while Part Five brings in Athanasius's and an anonymous hagiographer's perspectives on pilgrimage in Egypt. The volume includes illustrations of the Abu Mina site, pilgrims' ampules from the Thecla shrine, as well as several maps.

P.W. Pestman

The New Papyrological Primer is a fully revised and expanded edition of David and Groningen's 1964 standard introduction to Greek papyrological texts. The current edition contains 81 Greek texts, arranged in a chronological order, which illustrate various aspects of life in Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine Egypt. Each text is provided with a short commentary and explanatory notes, which aim to allow students to understand the text and to place it accurately in its social context. A lengthy introduction provides general background information, data about the texts examined and discussion of a number of commonly neglected topics. A glossary of Greek terms is appended. The work contains numerous plates, illustrations and maps.

Naiditch