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Edited by Ronan Crowley and Dirk Van Hulle

New Quotatoes, Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age offers fourteen original essays on the genetic dossiers of Joyce’s fiction and the ties that bind the literary archive to the transatlantic print sphere of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Availing of digital media and tools, online resources, and new forms of access, the contributions delve deeper than ever before into Joyce’s programmatic reading for his oeuvre, and they posit connections and textual relations with major and minor literary figures alike never before established. The essays employ a broad range of genetic methodologies from ‘traditional’ approaches to intertextuality and allusion to computational methods that plumb Large-scale Digitisation Initiatives like Google Books to the possibilities of databasing for Joyce studies.

Contributors: Scarlett Baron, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Ronan Crowley, Sarah Davison, Tom De Keyser, Daniel Ferrer, Finn Fordham, Robbert-Jan Henkes, John Simpson, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle, Chrissie Van Mierlo, and Wim Van Mierlo.

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Michał Obszyński

Manifestes et programmes littéraires aux Caraïbes francophones étudie les textes manifestaires et programmatiques publiés aux Caraïbes francophones durant le XXe siècle. Il fait apparaître les enjeux esthétiques et idéologiques qui sous-tendent les débats littéraires en Haïti et aux Antilles françaises. Il montre également l’évolution de ces manifestes au gré des mutations socio-politiques et intellectuelles de cette période.
De la génération de La Ronde à la littérature-monde, en passant par, entre autres, l’indigénisme, la négritude, le réalisme merveilleux et la créolité, Michał Obszyński dresse un large panorama des principaux projets littéraires de la Caraïbe francophone. Son ouvrage permet de mieux comprendre l’émergence de ces courants littéraires et montre le rôle vital du manifeste dans leur formation et leur diffusion.


Manifestes et programmes littéraires aux Caraïbes francophones analyses the manifestoes and programmatic texts published in the French speaking Caribbean since the beginning of the twentieth century until present times. It uncovers the aesthetic and ideological issues underlying the literary debates in Haiti and the French West Indies. It also shows the evolution of these manifestos according to the socio-political and intellectual changes of that period.
From the generation of La Ronde to the concept of littérature-monde, through, inter altra, indigénisme, négritude, réalisme merveilleux or créolité, Michał Obszyński provides a broad overview of the major literary projects of the French speaking Caribbean. His work sheds light on the emergence of these literary movements and shows the vital role of the manifesto in their establishment and propagation.

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Edited by Susana Araújo, Marta Pacheco Pinto and Sandra Bettencourt

At a time when the mass media insist on bombarding us with news about natural, political and economic disasters, words, ideas and images associated with such “crises” and “catastrophes” shape to a great extent collective memory and current imagination. Fear and Fantasy in a Global World seeks to stir the debate on the processes and meanings of, as well as on the relations between, fear and fantasy in the globalized world. Collective fears and fantasies are analysed from a number of cross-disciplinary perspectives, promoted by the epistemological underpinnings of comparative literature. In various ways and from different disciplinary angles, the 17 essays here gathered respond to and scrutinize key questions related to the imaginaries of fear and fantasy, as well as their relations to trauma, crisis, anxiety, and representations of both the conscious and the unconscious.

Contributors: Alexandra Hills, Ana Filipa Prata, Brecht de Groote, Christin Grunert, Christopher Bollas, Daniela Di Pasquale, David Vichnar, Edith Beltrán, Gero Guttzeit, Hande Gurses, Harriet Hulme, James Rushing Daniel, João Pedro da Costa, Margarita García Candeira, Marija Sruk, Martijn Boven, and Ortwin de Graef.

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Edited by Max Saunders and Sara Haslam

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. He is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which was adapted by Tom Stoppard for the acclaimed 2012 television series, starring Benedict Cumberbatch.
This volume marks the centenary of The Good Soldier, with eighteen essays by established experts and new scholars. It includes groundbreaking work on the novel’s narrative technique, chronology, and genre; plus pioneering work considering the treatment of bodies and minds; eugenics; poison; and surveillance. Innovative comparative studies discuss Ford’s novel in relation to Henry James, Violet Hunt, H. G. Wells, Franz Kafka, Jean Rhys, David Jones, and Lawrence Durrell.

Narrated Communities – Narrated Realities

Narration as Cognitive Processing and Cultural Practice

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Edited by Hermann Blume, Christoph Leitgeb and Michael Rössner

Culture studies try to understand how people assume identities and how they perceive reality. In this perspective narration, as a basic form of cognitive processing, is a fundamental cultural technique. Narrations provide the coherence, temporal organization and semantic integration that are essential for the development and communication of identity, knowledge and orientation in a socio-cultural context.
In essence, Anderson’s “Imagined Communities” need to be thought of as “Narrated Communities” from the beginning. Narration is made up by what people think; and vice versa, narration makes up people's thoughts. What is considered "fictitious" or "real" no longer separates narratives from an "outside" they refer to, but rather represents different narratives.
Narration not only constructs notions of what was “real” in retrospect, but also prospectively creates possible worlds, even in the (supposedly hard) sciences, as in e.g. the imaginative simulation of physical processes. The book’s unique interdisciplinary approach shows how the implications of this fundamental insight go far beyond the sphere of literature and carry weight for both scholarly and scientific disciplines.

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Maria-Sabina Draga Alexandru

This book starts with a consideration of a 1997 issue of the New Yorker that celebrated fifty years of Indian independence, and goes on to explore the development of a pattern of performance and performativity in contemporary Indian fiction in English (Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy and Vikram Chandra). Such fiction, which constructs identity through performative acts, is built around a nomadic understanding of the self and implies an evolution of narrative language towards performativity whereby the text itself becomes nomadic. A comparison with theatrical performance (Peter Brook’s Mahabharata and Girish Karnad’s ‘theatre of roots’) serves to support the argument that in both theatre and fiction the concepts of performance and performativity transform classical Indian mythic poetics. In the mythic symbiosis of performance and storytelling in Indian tradition within a cyclical pattern of estrangement from and return to the motherland and/or its traditions, myth becomes a liberating space of consciousness, where rigid categories and boundaries are transcended.

Locating Italy

East and West in British–Italian Transactions

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Edited by Kirsten Sandrock and Owain Wright

Locating Italy: East and West in British-Italian Transactions is part of a series of books that examines cross-cultural processes between Britain and Italy. The volume explores for the first time British-Italian exchanges in terms of East-West, rather than North-South. In so doing, it reveals that Italy has long been a meeting point of East and West as much as one of North and South. Comprising essays from the fields of history, politics, the philosophy of language, linguistics, literature, and the arts, the collection illustrates that the dynamics of British–Italian transactions have long been shaped by a fascinating process of location and relocation. Locating Italy is pathbreaking in questioning the traditional categories of North, South, East, and West in interactions between these two countries and their respective cultures.

Provocation and Negotiation

Essays in Comparative Criticism

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Edited by Gesche Ipsen, Timothy Mathews and Dragana Obradović

This collection of essays takes on two of the most pressing questions that face the discipline of Comparative Literature today: “Why compare?” and “Where do we go from here?”. At a difficult economic time, when universities all over the world once again have to justify the social as well as academic value of their work, it is crucial that we consider the function of comparison itself in reaching across disciplinary and cultural boundaries.
The essays written for this book are by researchers from all over the world, and range in topic from the problem of translating biblical Hebrew to modern atheism, from Freud to Marlene van Niekerk, from the formation of one person’s identity to experiences of globalisation, and the relation of history to fiction. Together they display the ground-breaking, ideas which lie at the heart of an act as deceptively simple as comparing one piece of writing to another.

The Time before Death

Twentieth-Century Memoirs

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Constantin V. Ponomareff

This collection of fifteen essays deals with the literary memoirs of major twentieth-century writers and focuses on the spiritual, physical and moral devastation of 20th century life. They are comparative and cross-cultural. There is no other collection of essays with this range brought under one cover.

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David Leon Higdon

Wandering into Brave New World explores the historical contexts and contemporary sources of Aldous Huxley’s 1932 novel which, seventy years after its initial publication remains the best known and most discussed dystopian work of the twentieth century. This new study addresses a number of questions which still remain open. Did his round-the-world trip in 1925-1926 provide material for the novel? Did India’s caste system contribute to the novel’s human levels? Is there an overarching pattern to the names of the novel/s characters? Has the role of Hollywood in the novel been underestimated? Is Lenina Crown a representative 1920s “flapper”? Did Huxley have knowledge of and sources for his Indian reservation characters and scenes quite independent of and more accurate than those of D. H. Lawrence’s writings? Did Huxley’s visit to Borneo contribute anything to the novel? New research allows substantive answers and even explains why Huxley linked such figures as Henry Ford and Sigmund Freud. It also shows how the novel overcomes its intense grounding in 1920s political turmoil to escape into the timelessness of dystopian fiction.