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Edited by Emanuel Tov

The Dead Sea Scrolls represents perhaps the most significant historical manuscript discovery in recent history. Brill’s Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Non-Biblical Texts offers a unique opportunity to study state of the art photographs of these ancient scripts, and understand their meaning using the translations of text and interpretations for missing fragments.

The Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Non-Biblical Texts provides users with a comprehensive tool for the study of the non-biblical texts from the Judean Desert (the “Dead Sea Scrolls”). It contains high resolution images of the Non-Biblical Dead Sea Scroll fragments and all the texts, in the original languages and in translation. It enables content searching using a sophisticated inventory, and examining finer details of the original texts through search options and zoom possibilities for the images. Never before has such comprehensive information been available in one place.

The complete collection consists of the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Non-Biblical Texts and the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts. Used side by side, these databases offer the user access to all the Dead Sea Scrolls texts.

This online product is based on The Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library CD-ROM, published by Brill and Brigham Young University, 1999.
The World Council of Churches Archives Online offers access to the unique archival materials of the World Council of Churches Archives, such as the collection from WWII period, the Correspondence of the General Secretary, the documents on the Relations with the Roman Catholic Church, and the Dialogues with the People of Living Faiths. Those collections include personal correspondence of notable scholars, theologians and politicians, as well as newspaper articles, press clippings, press releases, telegrams, minutes, manuscripts and personal notes held by the WCC in Geneva. The following collections are scheduled to be made available digitally in the following years: Correspondence of the General Secretariat, the Program to Combat Racism, the Dialogues with the People of Living Faiths, a.o.
Already published in the series: World Council of Churches Online: World War II Era Records World Council of Churches Online: Relations with the Roman Catholic Church
The Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online collections consists of the following collections:
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 1: Pioneer Orientalists: The Manuscript Collections of Scaliger, Raphelengius and Golius from Leiden University Libraries
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 2: The Ottoman Legacy of Levinus Warner: 140 volumes from the Warner Collection, totaling 45,809 pages of Ottoman Turkish, Arabic, and Persian texts. All these manuscripts were acquired by the great scholar Levinus Warner during his stay in Istanbul from 1644 until his death in 1665
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 3: Arabic Manuscripts from the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest: The manuscript holdings of the Oriental Collection in the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, consisting of 200 manuscripts.
The Prize Papers archive, part of the archives of the High Court of Admiralty kept in The National Archives (TNA) Kew, is commonly regarded as one of the most valuable archives in the field of maritime history.

In the course of its many naval engagements the British Royal Navy seized numerous enemy ships. Documents pertaining to tens of thousands of these seized ships (“prizes”), Dutch and French, Spanish and Portuguese, but also Danish, Swedish, German, Italian and American have been preserved. Every ship's file contains at least one document in English: transcriptions of the interrogations by the Prize Courts of the captain and other crew members aboard ships taken as lawful prizes.

This huge collection is of interest not only to maritime historians, but also to social, economic, political and cultural historians too. The English authorities enquired about the origin, the route and planned destination, tonnage, freight and crew members, about citizenship, national allegiance, and the personal migration history of the interrogated crew members. The answers were interpreted into English, and written down by professional secretaries. This results in a wealth of information, standardized in its presentation, always in English. As the Prize Papers are international in nature, they enable comparisons between different maritime nations.

Brill has digitized the interrogations, and made them available online to researchers all over the world. Prize Papers Online provide images of each interrogation , while the answers to the fourteen most researched questions have been transcribed and stored in a searchable database. Names of places have been standardized according to authorized LoC conventions. Because of the large scope, the product is divided into three collections, each matching a (set of) war(s) in which England was involved from the second half of the seventeenth until the end of the eighteenth century, and offered separately or as a complete set to academic institutions worldwide through Brill’s online platform for research collections.

Prize Papers Online consists of:
Prize Papers Online 1: American Revolutionary War and Fourth Anglo-Dutch War.
Prize Papers Online 2: Seven Years' War and War of the Austrian Succession.
Prize Papers Online 3: First, Second and Third Anglo-Dutch War and War of the Spanish Succession.
Prize Papers Online Atlas (Open Access).