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D.H Heilijgers

The Kubjikāmatatantra in its Kulālikāmnāya version represents the primary literary source for the cult of the Hindu goddess Kubjikā. Three out of its twenty-five chapters, that is chapters 14-16, are devoted to a discussion of five cakras forming a system hitherto unknown. These five cakras are the seat of a great number of goddesses - called the Devīs, the Dūtīs, the Mātṛs, the Yoginīs and the Khecarīs, respectively - and, to a lesser degree, of male deities as well.

Heilijgers’ study presents a detailed examination of the esoteric doctrine concerning these cakras. After an introduction and a chapter on some general features of the flve cakras, each of the next five chapters deals with one separate cakra, discussing its presiding deities, its location in the human body and its symbolism. The second part contains the Sanskrit text of chapters 14-16 of the Kubjikāmatatantra, the annotated translation of these chapters and some appendices.

The book offers a valuable contribution to a more thorough understanding of and insight into the Kubjikā doctrine, which occupies an important position within the Śakta oriented Hindu Tantric tradition.

The Rāsa Māna ke Pada of Kevalarāma

A Medieval Hindi Text of the Eighth Gaddī of the Vallabha Sect

Series:

Alan W. Entwistle

This book of the well-known Braj specialist, Prof Dr A.W. Entwistle (University of Washington), focuses on the medieval tradition of the eighth branch of the Vallabha sect.

The lengthy introduction deals with the sectarian background of the branch, including a survey of the relevant tradition and history of medieval Vaiṣṇava devotion as a whole and the Vallabha sect in particular. It discusses the structure of the Puṣṭimārga and its gaddīs, or branches, since Rāsa Māna ke Pada is part of the literary heritage of the sect’s Eighth Gaddī which, until partition in 1947, was based at Dera Ghazi Khan (now in Pakistan). It gives a , survey of the life and works of the founders of this gaddī, ŚrI Lālajī, and of his grandson Kevalarāma.

Due attention is also paid to the language of the text and in an appendix a comparative etymological glossary is given that cites examples from other Braj Bhāṣā authors in order to support interpretations of the more obscure words and idioms.

The main part of the book consists of a critical edition of the Rāsa Māna ke Pada, a collection of poems attributed to Kevalarāma, and an annotated translation into English.

The Battle for Junk Ceylon

The Syair Sultan Maulana

Series:

C. Skinner

The Battle for Junk Ceylon presents a new scholarly edition of the text of the Malay “ballad” known as the Syair Sultan Maulana, together with an English translation. This long poem was written during the second decade of the 19th century by the secretary to the Lakasamana (Admiral) of the sultanate of Kedah. It gives an eye-witness account if the events which occurred during the early part of the reign of Sultan Ahmad Tajuddin, in particular the part played by the Kedah fleet in helping the Siamese to expel the Burmese form the island of Phuket (“Junk Ceylon”) on the west coast of southern Thailand.
The accuracy and relative lack of bias on the part of the author make this Malay text a primary source of some importance, and accordingly the editor has concentrated his attention on the historical features of the text, in particular the military and naval aspects of the Junk Ceylon campaign, thereby also making use of sources in Thai in order to paint a remarkably clear picture of the course of the events.

Series:

Stuart Robson

Critical edition and translation of Wanban Wideya. In the extensive introduction, Robson introduces the term Middle Javanese and the Panji story, discusses this Middle-Javanese romance from a literary viewpoint and provides a summary of the plot. Following the text and translation a commentary, a glossary, and a list of names found in the text are given.

Series:

G.W.J. Drewes

New edition and complete translation of the sixteenth-century Javanese Muslim text “The Admonitions of Seh Bari”. In his introduction, Drewes discusses the manuscript, script, spelling, punctuation, author, contents of the work, main ideas of the work, the Catechism drawn from this text, and a comparison of the Catechism with the main text.

Series:

S.O. Robson

This edition of the Classical Malay prose work, the Hikajat Andakén Penurat includes an English translation and an Introduction explaining the place of the work in Malay literature. The Hikajat Andakén Penurat tells the story of the prince Raden Andakén Penurat and his beloved, Kèn Tambuhan. It is closely related to the Shair Kèn Tambuhan, a poem that has appeared in several editions. The story is relatively short and well written; it is representative of its genre. The book is especially intended for readers who have little or no knowledge of Malay.