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The Paippalādasaṃhitā of the Atharvaveda

A New Edition with Translation and Commentary

Series:

Arlo Griffiths

This work presents a new edition of two kāṇḍas ("books") of the Paippalādasaṃhitā, generally considered to be among the most important Vedic texts, yet still only partially available in published form. In so doing, it aims to provide a model for future first and new editions of other kāṇḍas. The edition constituted in this work is a new edition, that constitutes a major improvement on the editio princeps, including dozens of improved readings, providing a more methodical presentation of the transmitted manuscript evidence, and based on a more representative sample of manuscripts. General editorial deliberations are laid down in an elaborate Introduction, which explains and justifies the methodology that has been adopted; specific editorial problems are addressed in an elaborate philological commentary. All passages edited or cited in the commentary have been translated. The work is completed with a complete index verborum to the two edited kāṇḍas and an index locorum of Paippalādasaṃhitā passages cited in the commentary.

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Edited by J. Noorduyn and A. Teeuw

Preserved on undated palm-leaf manuscripts, Old Sundanese texts are generally in poor condition and unavailable to a wider audience. There are limited texts in any form of Sundanese, and only limited knowledge of Old Sundanese. In presenting three long Old Sundanese poems, Noorduyn and Teeuw, in a heretofore unequalled English-language study of Old Sundanese literature, bring to the light works of importance for further linguistic, literary and historical research.
The three poems, The Sons of Rama and Rawana, The ascension of Sri Ajnyana and The story of Bujangga Manik: A pilgrim's progress were undiscovered before this book. The first two were found in a nineteenth-century manuscript collection of the former Batavian Society and are now in the National Library of Indonesia in Jakarta, while the third was donated to the Bodleian Library in Oxford as early as 1627, though it was not identified as an Old Sundanese poem until the 1950s.

Abhinavagupta's Philosophy of Revelation

An Edition and Annotated Translation of Mālinīślokavārttika I, 1-399

Series:

Jürgen Hanneder

The first part of the ‘Versified Commentary on the Mālinītantra’ (Mālinīślokvārttika) by the tenth-century theologian Abhinavagupta, which is translated here for the first time, presents a philosophy of Śaiva revelation, conceived of as a descent of the highest non-dual form of knowledge, through the different levels of speech, into the knowledge embodied in the canon of Tantras or Agamas on which the Śaiva religion is based. The aim of the text is to demonstrate the logic behind the claim of the monistic Tantric schools on which Abhinavagupta bases his philosophy.

The present volume deals in its introduction with the scriptural background of the Śaiva religion because that is a prerequisite for understanding many of the arguments in the text. The translation is accompanied by a re-edition of the Sanskrit text with the help of two manuscripts not consulted before, and a running commentary. A fragment of the Śrīkaṇṭī, which is probably the source for some of Abhinavaguptas theories of the Śaiva canon, is transcribed in an appendix.

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William Collins

This study presents the text and translation of an oral epic, or guritan, relating the exploits of Radin Suane, which was recorded during anthropological fieldwork among the Besemah, in the remote highlands of South Sumatra. Documentation of an epic in Besemah, a little known Sumatran-Malay language, will be useful for comparative purposes to specialists in Malaysian and Indonesian languages and literatures. This work is also intended to serve students of ethnography, folklore and oral poetry, as well as general readers who may not be familiar with Sumatran culture. Accordingly, an extensive commentary has been provided to give a cultural context for understanding this epic.

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Edited by T. Goudriaan and J.A. Schoterman

The two main constituents of the Hindu ritual-speculative tradition, the Vedic and the Tantric, are often considered to be more or less antagonistic. The actual situation is less simple: there are resemblances, intersections and combinations, which tend to fuse both elements into a continuous tradition. The Kubjikā Upaniṣad is a unique document which illustrates this continuity.

The text consists of twenty-five chapters, which have never before been edited or translated. It belongs to the corpus of the younger, so-called ‘sectarian’ Upaniṣads. The critical edition was prepared by Schoterman from three manuscripts. After his untimely death, Goudriaan finalized the edition and added the translation, an introduction, and an appendix in which four more (fragmentary) manuscripts are evaluated. The text is basically Tantric; it reveals mantras and mandṇḍalas of the goddess Kubjikā and other members of her pantheon, supplemented by a digression on the morning-worship of the Goddess. The Vedic element consists of more than 100 Atharvavedic stanzas, sometimes of high literary quality, integrated into the Kubjikan ritual system. In addition, there are descriptions of magical rites in a true Atharvanic vein. All this results in a not perfectly harmonized, yet undoubtedly intriguing and partly still mysterious, text, which shows the development and practice of Goddess worship in South Asia from an unexpected point of view.

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D.H Heilijgers

The Kubjikāmatatantra in its Kulālikāmnāya version represents the primary literary source for the cult of the Hindu goddess Kubjikā. Three out of its twenty-five chapters, that is chapters 14-16, are devoted to a discussion of five cakras forming a system hitherto unknown. These five cakras are the seat of a great number of goddesses - called the Devīs, the Dūtīs, the Mātṛs, the Yoginīs and the Khecarīs, respectively - and, to a lesser degree, of male deities as well.

Heilijgers’ study presents a detailed examination of the esoteric doctrine concerning these cakras. After an introduction and a chapter on some general features of the flve cakras, each of the next five chapters deals with one separate cakra, discussing its presiding deities, its location in the human body and its symbolism. The second part contains the Sanskrit text of chapters 14-16 of the Kubjikāmatatantra, the annotated translation of these chapters and some appendices.

The book offers a valuable contribution to a more thorough understanding of and insight into the Kubjikā doctrine, which occupies an important position within the Śakta oriented Hindu Tantric tradition.

The Rāsa Māna ke Pada of Kevalarāma

A Medieval Hindi Text of the Eighth Gaddī of the Vallabha Sect

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Alan W. Entwistle

This book of the well-known Braj specialist, Prof Dr A.W. Entwistle (University of Washington), focuses on the medieval tradition of the eighth branch of the Vallabha sect.

The lengthy introduction deals with the sectarian background of the branch, including a survey of the relevant tradition and history of medieval Vaiṣṇava devotion as a whole and the Vallabha sect in particular. It discusses the structure of the Puṣṭimārga and its gaddīs, or branches, since Rāsa Māna ke Pada is part of the literary heritage of the sect’s Eighth Gaddī which, until partition in 1947, was based at Dera Ghazi Khan (now in Pakistan). It gives a , survey of the life and works of the founders of this gaddī, ŚrI Lālajī, and of his grandson Kevalarāma.

Due attention is also paid to the language of the text and in an appendix a comparative etymological glossary is given that cites examples from other Braj Bhāṣā authors in order to support interpretations of the more obscure words and idioms.

The main part of the book consists of a critical edition of the Rāsa Māna ke Pada, a collection of poems attributed to Kevalarāma, and an annotated translation into English.

The Battle for Junk Ceylon

The Syair Sultan Maulana

Series:

C. Skinner

The Battle for Junk Ceylon presents a new scholarly edition of the text of the Malay “ballad” known as the Syair Sultan Maulana, together with an English translation. This long poem was written during the second decade of the 19th century by the secretary to the Lakasamana (Admiral) of the sultanate of Kedah. It gives an eye-witness account if the events which occurred during the early part of the reign of Sultan Ahmad Tajuddin, in particular the part played by the Kedah fleet in helping the Siamese to expel the Burmese form the island of Phuket (“Junk Ceylon”) on the west coast of southern Thailand.
The accuracy and relative lack of bias on the part of the author make this Malay text a primary source of some importance, and accordingly the editor has concentrated his attention on the historical features of the text, in particular the military and naval aspects of the Junk Ceylon campaign, thereby also making use of sources in Thai in order to paint a remarkably clear picture of the course of the events.

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S.O. Robson

This edition of the Classical Malay prose work, the Hikajat Andakén Penurat includes an English translation and an Introduction explaining the place of the work in Malay literature. The Hikajat Andakén Penurat tells the story of the prince Raden Andakén Penurat and his beloved, Kèn Tambuhan. It is closely related to the Shair Kèn Tambuhan, a poem that has appeared in several editions. The story is relatively short and well written; it is representative of its genre. The book is especially intended for readers who have little or no knowledge of Malay.