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Atlas of Southeast Europe

Geopolitics and History. Volume Three: 1815-1926

Series:

Hans H.A. Hötte

Edited by Gábor Demeter and Dávid Turbucs

This atlas offers a survey of the history of Southeast Europe from 1815-1926, from the eve of the Second Serbian Uprising until the conclusion of the First World War for the Ottoman Empire. It covers modern-day Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Romania (Wallachia and Transylvania), Dalmatia, Greece and Cyprus.

Edited by Sijmen Tol and René Genis

Within international linguistics, the study of Slavic languages enjoys considerable interest. The extensive coverage of Slavic languages in the Linguistic Bibliography is evidence of this. The Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics, 2000-2014 brings together the details of over 67,000 unique publications, carefully selected, classified, cross-referenced and indexed by professional bibliographers: it gives a complete overview of the field of studies since the beginning of this century. All contributing bibliographers are specialized Slavists themselves, guaranteeing the quality of the descriptions and annotations. The selection includes over thirty publication languages including publications in Finnish, Estonian, Greek, Albanian, Dutch, English, German, Japanese, Hebrew as well as other languages. Marc L. Greenberg’s Introduction gives an overview of the state of scholarship in Slavic linguistics and the directions in which the field is headed. The 3 volumes are thematically and geographically ordered in the sections General, Slavic, South Slavic, West Slavic and East Slavic. All references are classified according to a sophisticated classification scheme (over 100 subject classes), refined with an extensive language and subject keyword index.
Key features:
• Over 67,000 records;
• Covering all Slavic languages including minor and even extinct ones e.g. Bosnian, Pomeranian, Rusyn, High and Low Sorbian as well as Church Slavonic;
• Titles are given in their original languages, with translations provided whenever relevant;
• Titles in Cyrillic script are uniformly transcribed in Latin script according to current scientific standards.
Scope
The Bibliography of the History and Archaeology of Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages is a fundamental source of information for the study of the history and archaeology of medieval East Central and Eastern Europe, an area of great interference and symbiosis of influences from Scandinavia, Western Europe, the steppe lands of Eurasia, as well as Byzantium. The bibliography provides comprehensive coverage of all publications, in all languages, pertaining to this vast area of the European continent and its impact on European history from about 500 to the aftermath of the Mongol invasion of 1241. The bibliography aims to encourage further research, but also to provide guidance through an enormous amount of information available in a variety of languages and a great multitude of publications. It offers search capabilities which are particularly useful for very narrowly defined research goals, thus encouraging comparative work with materials from other parts of Europe.

Key features
• Contains over 65,000 bibliographical records
• Updated annually, with approximately 1,000 to 2,000 new records added
• All titles in languages other than English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish are translated into English
• Full browsing possibilities: the bibliography is browsable via filters, inlcuing publication date, format, language, and subject keywords
• Fully searchable: full text search, keyword search, author search, title search
• Over 5,000 keywords, covering geographical, chronological, and thematic categories, allowing both general and specific searches; unclear keywords are clarified by illustrations

Subjects included in the Bibliography of the History and Archaeology of Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages:
• history and art history
• archaeology, bioarchaeology, and zooarchaeology
• linguistics and philology
• paleography, epigraphy, and manuscript studies
• numismatics and sigillography
• climate history and paleobotany

Publication forms included in the Bibliography of the History and Archaeology of Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages:
• books (monographs)
• articles from journals, including e-journals
• chapters from edited volumes, including Festschriften and conference proceedings
• reviews and review articles
• bibliographies
• PhD dissertations and MA theses
• critical editions and translations of primary sources

Endorsements
"This Bibliography opens the door to a wealth of titles of articles and books dealing with the written and archaeological data for western Eurasian history from the Baltic, the Middle Danube and the Adriatic to Byzantium, the Urals and beyond. As one might expect from the editor’s track-record, a very wide range of materials has undergone judicious selection and characterization, particularly with reference to archaeological publications, for the period from c. 500 until the new order which the Mongols brought to much of Western Eurasia in the mid-thirteenth century. Keywords guide the novice further into the subject, step by step, while the specialist can zero in on the topic, technical term or author of their choice. Matters of literary, cultural or general history receive their due, and one can pursue such topics as Law and Liturgy in a Dalmatian city, the Rus Metropolitan Ilarion’s Sermon on Law and Grace, or the ritual goings-on at the Polish town of Gniezno in 1000 with equal ease. Given the fragmented and multilingual nature of the subject matter and the countless problems of interpretation raised by our all too scanty narrative sources, the navigation-aids provided in this Bibliography will be invaluable for students and scholars alike. The directions are given clearly enough to make sense even to a digital non-native (such as myself)."
Jonathan Shepard, University of Oxford.

"The Bibliography of the History and Archaeology of Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages is an essential tool for scholars interested in the history of the region. It offers a comprehensive list of more than 65,000 bibliographic entries in major western languages. In addition it brings also the vast production of historians and archaeologists published in local languages, usually unnoticed by western scholars. The bibliography is a modern, first-hand heuristic tool for anyone interested in medieval history and archaeology of East and East Central Europe. It is user friendly and provides thousands of entries fully classified by date and key words, including full bibliographical record."
Dusan Zupka, Comenius University, Bratislava.
Brill offers two collections of Russian military intelligence on Asia, namely the Archive Series and the Secret Prints. Together, they comprise a wealth of hitherto virtually unknown data about Asia that were gathered before the 20th century by explorers, military attachés, diplomats, academics, and others.
Brill in cooperation with the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, for the first time brings together a unique collection of rare primary sources on a vital and dynamic part of the history of Turkey, Russia, the Middle East and Western Europe Russian-Ottoman Relations. During the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, the balance of power between Russia and the Ottoman Empire was constantly monitored in Western Europe, where several powers had designs of their own on some of the Ottoman territories. In Germany and France, in particular, all kinds of accounts, opinions, and plans were published that were influenced by, or aimed to influence, Russian-Ottoman relations. They include publications of relevant government documents, diplomatic reports, travel accounts that provided new details about hitherto relatively unknown regions, and fiercely political (and polemical) tracts and pamphlets designed to rally public support for one power or the other. Published across Europe over a period of two centuries, these sources provide detailed insights not only in the military ebb and flow of Russian-Ottoman relations, but also in their effects on European public opinion.

This series currently consists of 4 parts:
Part 1: The Origins 1600-1800
Part 2: Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853
Part 3: The Crimean War 1854-1856
Part 4: The End of the Empires, 1857-1914