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Author: Jeehei Park
In this work, Jeehei Park proposes Greek and Roman cosmopolitanism as a constructive category through which to navigate a reading of human diversity and communal unity in Paul’s letters. Park takes a thorough look at the cosmopolitan ideas of Diogenes of Sinope, Philo, Plutarch, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius to establish Paul as an interlocutor who critically participated in the discourse of cosmopolitanism. Park characterizes Paul’s understanding of unity with the distinctive phrase “heterogeneous unity,” in which human differences are respected and embraced rather than being universalized or homogenized. This book offers a novel analysis of Paul’s rhetoric about citizenship in Philippians and its adoption of Greek and Roman cosmopolitanism as an interpretive contour.
Author: Gohar Muradyan
Greek myths were, to some extent, familiar to medieval Armenian authors, mainly through translations of late classical and early Christian writings; they also appear in original works, but this knowledge was never profound or accurate. Both translators and Armenian authors, as well as later scribes, while translating, renarrating and copying short mythical stories, or mentioning or just alluding to them often related the stories and the familiar or unfamiliar names occurring in them correctly, but sometimes they made mistakes, chiefly corrupting names not well-known to them, and sometimes, even details of the plot.
This is the first study which brings together the references to ancient Greek myths (154 episodes) in medieval Armenian literature by including the original Armenian and Greek (if extant) text and translation. With appendices listing the occurrences of Greek gods, their Armenian equivalents, images, altars, temples, and rites, the Aesopian fables and the Trojan war.
Author: René Bloch
In the Hellenistic period, Jews participated in the imagination of a cosmopolitan world and they developed their own complex cultural forms. In this panoramic and multifaceted book, René Bloch shows that the ancient Jewish diaspora is an integral part of what we understand as Hellenism and argues that Jewish Hellenism epitomizes Hellenism at large. Relying on Greek, Latin and Hebrew sources, the fifteen papers collected in this volume trace the evidence of ancient Jews through meticulous studies of ruins, literature, myth and modern reception taking the reader on a journey from Philo’s Alexandria to a Roman bust in a Copenhagen museum
Critical Edition, Translation and Commentary
The apocryphal Apocalypse of Paul (Visio Pauli) plunges us right into the heart of early-Christian conceptions of heaven and hell. Its vivid eyewitness account of otherworldly punishment and reward was translated into many different languages and inspired numerous later authors, among whom Dante. This book offers a re-edition and English translation of the ancient Coptic version. An exhaustive commentary makes the text accessible and situates it in the time and place where it was written, fourth-century Egypt. As this new study shows, the Coptic version is by far the best available witness of the original Apocalypse of Paul.
Author: David Phillips
Authoritative, Based on the Best Syriac Text, and Fully Annotated The Bible of Edessa is an authoritative translation of the Peshitta, the Syriac version of the Hebrew Bible. It is named after the city of Edessa in upper Mesopotamia, the birthplace of the Peshitta and home to the form of Aramaic now called Syriac.
The Bible of Edessa is based on the oldest and best Syriac manuscripts, as made available in the Leiden–Amsterdam Peshitta edition. Its volumes also come with an introduction and extensive annotations. The Bible of Edessa is authorized by the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) and published by the Amsterdam Peshitta Institute under supervision of an international editorial board.
Volume Editors: Heleen E. Zorgdrager and Pieter Vos
In many societies all over the world, an increasing polarization between contrasting groups can be observed. Polarization arises when a fear born of difference turns into ‘us-versus-them’ thinking and rules out any form of compromise. This volume addresses polarizations within societies as well as within churches, and asks the question: given these dynamics, what may be the calling of the church? The authors offer new approaches to polarizing debates on topics such as racism, social justice, sexuality and gender, euthanasia, and ecology and agriculture in various contexts. They engage in profound theological and ecclesiological reflection, in particular from the Reformed tradition.

Contributors to this volume are: Najib George Awad, Henk van den Belt, Nadine Bowers Du Toit, Jaeseung Cha, David Daniels, David Fergusson, Jan Jorrit Hasselaar, Jozef Hehanussa, Allan Janssen, Klaas-Willem de Jong, Viktória Kóczián, Philipp Pattberg, Louise Prideaux, Emanuel Gerrit Singgih, Peter-Ben Smit, Thandi Soko-de Jong, Wim van Vlastuin, Jan Dirk Wassenaar, Elizabeth Welch, Annemarieke van der Woude, and Heleen Zorgdrager.
Getting a doctorate in Europe is supremely attractive for young Catholic priests from developing countries. They attain prestige, career advancement, and – in many cases – the opportunity to move permanently from impoverished countries to some of the world’s wealthiest. But do they submit rigorous, original doctoral research in keeping with universal academic standards? This study examines theological dissertations by international students accepted by major Austrian universities and shows that academic incompetence, plagiarism, and negligent supervision are seriously damaging theological institutions – in Europe and abroad. By looking the other way, advisors and administrators do their students and the church a disservice.
Proceedings of the Tenth Meeting of the International Organization for Qumran Studies (Aberdeen, 5–8 August, 2019)
Volume Editors: Pieter B. Hartog and Andrew Perrin
Approaching the Qumran scrolls as an intrinsic part of Hellenistic and Roman antiquity, this volume shows how the authors and collectors of the Scrolls shared the interests of other inhabitants of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East and engaged in the same debates and dialogues as others in the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Thus, this volume offers an invitation to both Scrolls scholars and academics working on other disciplines to create opportunities for interdisciplinary research and exchange.
Trauma Literature and the Joseph Story
Author: Caralie Cooke
This book reads the Joseph novella alongside contemporary trauma novels in order to analyze the loss of the assumptive world of the writer and readers of the Joseph novella. In turn, it re-thinks trauma theory in light of the “religious,” understood as the belief in and relationship to a God who orders the universe. Thus, this book argues that when we read the Joseph novella alongside contemporary trauma novels, we see a story written by people trying to reconstruct their assumptive world after the shattering of their old one, highlighting the significance of the religious dimension in trauma theory.
This volume focuses on Christianity in Attica and its metropolis, Athens, from Paul’s initial visit in the first century up to the closing of the philosophical schools under the reign of Justinian I in the sixth century. Underscoring the relevance of epigraphic resources and the importance of methodological sophistication in analysing especially archaeological evidence, it readdresses many questions on the basis of a larger body of evidence and aims to combine literary, epigraphic, and archaeological evidence in order to create the outlines of a narrative of the rise and development of Christianity in the area. It is the first interdisciplinary study on the local history of Christianity in the area.