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Author: Gábor Takács
This is the third and final volume of the Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian. It comprises the Egyptian words with initial m-. The amount of material offered, the extensive treatment of scholarly discussions on each item, and the insights into the connections of Egyptian and the related Afro-Asiatic (Semito-Hamitic) languages, including many new lexical parallels, will make it an indispensable tool for comparative purposes and an unchallenged starting point for every linguist in the field.
The reader will find the etymological entries even more detailed than those of the introductory volume, due to the full retrospective presentation of all etymologies proposed since A. Erman's time, and thanks to an extremely detailed discussion of all possible relevant data even on the less known Afro-Asiatic cognates to the Egyptian roots.
Author: Gábor Takács
The multi-volume Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian by Gábor Takács "promises to open a new chapter in Egyptian and Afro-Asiatic comparative lingustics" (A. Dolgopolsky, in Israel Oriental Studies). The amount of material offered, the extensive treatment of scholarly discussions on each item, and the insights into the connections of Egyptian and the related Afro-Asiatic (Semito-Hamitic) languages, including many new lexical parallels, will make it an indispensable tool for comparative purposes and an unchallenged starting point for every linguist in the field.
This second volume is in fact the first volume of the very etymological dictionary. It comprises the Egyptian words with initial b-, p-, and f-. The reader will find the etymological entries even more detailed than those of the introductory volume, due to the full retrospective presentation of all etymologies proposed since A. Erman's time, and thanks to an extremely detailed discussion of all possible relevant data even on the less known Afro-Asiatic cognates to the Egyptian roots.
The present volume is the long-awaited lexicon of Egyptian coffin texts. In 1961 A. de Buck published his important seven-volume Egyptian Coffin Texts. The major Egyptian dictionaries having appeared before that date, De Buck's 1961 corpus of texts was left without lexicographical covering since then.
The importance of these texts, however, is considerable for a variety of reasons; they are one of the most important literary texts of classical Egypt; the many variants greatly enlarge our understanding of grammar and linguistic structures; the coffin texts are magical texts, the effectiveness of which depended upon the exact reproductions of the original spells.
Included are all the variant hieroglyphic forms, and the fragments, often reconstructed, contained in De Buck's volume 7. Special features are a list (reproduction) of yet unreadable hieroglyphs, as well as a list of the cryptic writings, contained in the coffin texts.
The dictionary is shaped after Erman & Grapow's Wörterbuch der Ägyptischen Sprache and Faulkner's Egyptian Dictionary.