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Editor: Stefan Schorn
This volume is part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It contains new editions of the Greek paradoxographers of the Imperial Period and of uncertain date, fragmentary and non-fragmentary alike. It also includes the fragments of the related types of works On Rivers and On Stones. For the first time, all these texts have been provided with a comprehensive commentary. Together with volume IV E 1, this will constitute a new corpus of Greek paradoxography which will make Greek thought on the marvelous accessible to scholars of antiquity and later times.
Editor: Falko Daim
This compendium examines the history and culture of the Byzantine world from the foundation of Constantinople (324) to the Ottoman conquest of the city, which brought the final downfall of the Byzantine Empire (1453). A detailed 100-page introduction is followed by discussion of 15 key topics, including politics and government, people and society, legislation and legal practice, the army and navy, church and religion, nature and the environment, art and architecture, languages, literature, education and culture, medicine and music. Because the work forms part of Brill's New Pauly, particular attention is paid to aspects of continuity with the ancient world, and of innovation.
Ranging in time from the end of the Bronze Age to the dawn of the so-called historical period (12th-6th centuries BC), this compendium presents the first complete survey of the early history of all the cultures along the coasts of the Mediterranean. In addition to the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans, these also include many other peoples, such as the Iberians, Ligurians, Thracians, Phrygians, Luwians, Aramaeans and Libyans. The volume brings together the knowledge gained from material, textual and pictorial sources in all disciplines working in this field, including Near Eastern, Phoenician, Carthaginian and biblical archaeology, Aegean and North African studies, Villanovan studies and Etruscology, Iberology, early Greek historiography and Dark Ages studies. As a whole, this period was characterized by the intermingling of cultures around the Mediterranean Rim, and the main focus of content is therefore on contacts, the transfer of culture and knowledge and key common themes, such as mobility, religion, resources, languages and writing. With indices and numerous tables and maps of Pauly quality.
This English version has been edited by John Noel Dillon and translated by Duncan A. Smart
SEG LXII covers the publications of the year 2012, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2011 but pertaining to material from 2012.
SEG LXI covers the publications of the year 2011, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2010 but pertaining to material from 2011.
SEG LX covers the publications of the year 2010, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2009 but pertaining to material from 2010.
Author: Pietro Zaccaria
As part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography, this volume, by Pietro Zaccaria, contains new editions of the Hellenistic biographers of the first century BC and the Hellenistic biographers of uncertain date. More than one hundred fragments from biographies of philosophers, statesmen, and orators, penned by eleven Greek biographers, are critically edited, translated into English, and provided with comprehensive commentary. For each biographer, an introduction discusses the author’s dates, life, and works. By offering the first complete corpus of late Hellenistic biography preserved in fragments, this volume contributes to our knowledge and understanding of Hellenistic historiography and of ancient biography as a whole.
Lipsius' Saturnaliengespräche, eine textkritische Ausgabe mit Übersetzung, Einführung und Anmerkungen
Thema von Lipsius’ Saturnaliengespräche (1582) sind die Gladiatorenspiele. Alle Aspekte werden beleuchtet, zum Beispiel, welche Arten Gladiatoren es gab: da waren Kriminelle, aber auch hohe Beamte dabei, die – manchmal freiwillig – als Gladiatoren funktionierten. Die detaillierte Beschreibung schließt gut an bei seinen anderen historiographischen Werken, wie De Amphitheatro (1584). Am Ende der Saturnaliengespräche steht eine schwungvolle Rede über die bewundernswerten Beständigkeit der Gladiatoren. Lipsius spricht in verschiedenen Briefen über sie als leuchtende Vorbilder. Das passt zu seinem Vorhaben, die Stoa von Neuem bekannt zu machen. Er hatte dabei Erfolg, denn seine stoische Lehre erhielt viel Zuhörerschaft. De Constantia, das er 1584 zum ersten Mal publizierte, erfuhr zahllose Auflagen und Übersetzungen.

In his Saturnalian dialogues (1582), Lipsius describes all aspects of gladiatorial combat, for example, that a great variety of people – criminals but also highly placed officials – took part in the combats, sometimes as volunteers. This detailed description fits into Lipsius’ other historiographical works, such as De Amphitheatro, published in 1584. After an elaborate exposition about gladiators, in the last chapter of the Saturnalian dialogues he gives an impassioned speech about their admirable constancy despite extremely hard circumstances. In several letters, Lipsius also refers to gladiators as proper models to be imitated. His main aim, here and elsewhere, was the promotion of his Stoic ethic – a goal that would ultimately prove successful: De Constantia, first published in 1584, has gone through a large number of reprints, editions and translations.
This Index volume to Brill’s New Pauly: Encyclopedia of the Ancient World relates to the Antiquity volumes (volumes 1–15) and apart from indices, it also provides new materials to aid the reader in the study of the Ancient World. The first part of the volume consists of systematic guides, arranged by theme, to the entries relating to subjects and to persons. A concordance of geographical names helps the reader find ancient places by looking up the modern equivalents. An index of the maps and illustrations and a list of all contributors to these volumes completes the indices. The second half of this volume contains entirely new matter. It presents various lists and tables detailing laws and law codes, treaties, papyri, ostraka and manuscripts; weight, volume and monetary systems; as well as chronologies and time calculation systems. Together these form an indispensible gateway to the more than 15,000 entries of this part of the Encyclopedia.