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Editor: Seokwoo Lee
The Encyclopedia is also available online.

Incorporating the work of numerous leading scholars, the Encyclopedia of Public International Law in Asia provides a detailed description of the practice and implementation of international law in various Asian states. The Encyclopedia covers the introduction of Western international law and the resulting shift from the older Asian order; the development of modern international law; and the impact that all of this has had on Asian states.

Offered online and in print as three geographically-organized volumes – Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, and Central and South Asia – this reference work provides valuable information for all those interested in the historical development, implementation, and application of international law in Asia. Although there is general acknowledgement of the great variety of cultures among Asian countries, strong themes of familiarity, mutual understanding, coherence, and solidarity persists among them as a result of the numerous mutual cultural and religious contacts and interconnections that developed over the course of centuries. This examination of international law and its application in Asia reveals the shared history of the continent, as well as its unique development in each Asian state.

Each jurisdiction included in the Encyclopedia follows a standard structure for the broadest comparative advantage and starts with a Country Snapshot (Date of Independence, Date of Admission to the United Nations, Geographical Size, Population, Demographic Information, Form of Government, System of Law), followed by a State Report Overview (Executive summary of state report, Key highlights of unique state practice).

Coverage of the jurisdictions include the following items/chapters (where applicable):

THE STATE IN INTERNATIONAL LAW
History and Theoretical Approach of [The State] in International Law
Statehood & Sovereignty
Territory & Jurisdiction
Sovereign/State Immunity
State Responsibility
Relationship between International & Domestic Law

INSTITUTIONAL RELATIONS
Treaties
Diplomatic & Consular Relations
International & Regional Organisations
Individuals & Non-State Actors
International Relations & Cooperation
Settlement of Disputes

PARTICULAR INTERNATIONAL LAW SUBJECTS
International Economic Law
International Environmental Law
Law of the Sea
Air Law & Law of Outer Space
Human Rights
International Humanitarian Law
International Criminal Law
Use or Threat of Force
A Study with Critical Edition and Translation of the Legal Texts from Zhangjiashan Tomb no. 247
Law, State, and Society in Early Imperial China has been accorded Honorable Mention status in the 2017 Patrick D. Hanan Prize (China and Inner Asia Council (CIAC) of the Association for Asian Studies) for Translation competition.

In Law, State, and Society in Early Imperial China, Anthony J. Barbieri-Low and Robin D.S. Yates offer the first detailed study and translation into English of two recently excavated, early Chinese legal texts. The Statutes and Ordinances of the Second Year consists of a selection from the long-lost laws of the early Han dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE). It includes items from twenty-seven statute collections and one ordinance. The Book of Submitted Doubtful Cases contains twenty-two legal case records, some of which have undergone literary embellishment. Taken together, the two texts contain a wealth of information about slavery, social class, ranking, the status of women and children, property, inheritance, currency, finance, labor mobilization, resource extraction, agriculture, market regulation, and administrative geography.
The dictionary online includes two sets: one in traditional Chinese with English and French translations and the other in simplified Chinese with English and French translations. The print edition of the dictionary in traditional Chinese and simplified Chinese respectively will be published in 2019.

The Ricci Dictionary of Chinese Law (Chinese-English, French), developed by the Ricci Association since 2006, is the very first trilingual dictionary on Chinese law. The dictionary includes approximately 24,000 legal terms in Chinese (legal terms per se as well as terms which are often used in a legal context), as well as English and French translations of these terms. A team of around 40 French, Chinese and English-speaking lawyers, scholars, law students and proofreaders contributed to the dictionary under the supervision and guidance of the Ricci Association.

The dictionary focuses on "Chinese law," i.e. legal terms used by legal professionals working on Chinese legal documents. In the minds of the editors of the dictionary, law includes "actual" law (i.e., instruments and decisions of governmental authorities and courts which are legally enforceable against anyone falling in their scope), "past" law (i.e., laws that were "actual" some time ago but are not anymore) as well as law as a subject of theoretical discussion and an academic discipline. The dictionary includes 20 branches, including Ancient Law, Administrative Law, Admiralty Law, Banking and Financial Law, Civil Law, Commercial Law, Company Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Environmental Law, Institutions, Insurance Law, International Private Law, International Public Law, International Trade Law, IP Law, Jurisprudence, Labour Law, Procedure, and Tax Law. The terms included in the branches of international element (e.g., International Private Law, International Public Law and International Trade Law) can generally be characterized as relating to actual law or law as an academic discipline.

The dictionary would be invaluable to:
- lawyers in English and French speaking countries working with/on PRC (People’s Republic of China) legal documents in Chinese;
- Chinese lawyers and Chinese students;
- professional translators;
- academics working with PRC legal documents in Chinese in the fields of Chinese studies, legal studies and comparative social science studies;
- students outside China studying PRC legal documents; and
- journalists commenting on Chinese legal issues.