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The Wortatlas der arabischen Dialekte / Word Atlas of Arabic Dialects (WAD) intends to provide an unprecedented survey of the lexical richness and diversity of the Arabic dialects as spoken from Uzbekistan to Mauretania and Nigeria, from Malta to Sudan, and including the Ki-Nubi Creole as spoken in Uganda and Kenya. The multilingual word atlas consists of four volumes in total with some 500 onomasiological maps in full colour. Each map presents a topic or notion and its equivalents in Arabic as collected from the dialectological literature (dictionaries, grammars, text collections, ethnographic reports, etc.), from the editors’ own field work, from questionnaires filled out by native speakers or by experts for a certain dialect region, and also from the internet. Polyglot legends in German, English, French, Spanish, Italian accompany the maps to facilitate further access. Each map is followed by a commentary in German, providing more details about the sources and the individual forms, and discussing semantic and etymological issues. All quotations are in their original language. The maps mainly show lexical types, detailed and concrete forms are given in the commentaries. An introduction is provided in Volume 1 in both German and English. Indices of all lexemes in the atlas will be available for each volume. The first volume Band I: Mensch, Natur, Fauna und Flora / Volume 1: Mankind, Nature, Fauna and Flora contains subjects such as ‘family members’, ‘professions’, ‘human qualities’. The second volume, Band II: Materielle Kultur, deals with material culture (‘house’, ‘utensils’, ‘food’, ‘clothing’, ‘vehicles’, etc.). The third volume Band III: Verben, Adjektive, Zeit und Zahlen focuses on verbs, and adjectives. The forth volume Band IV: Funktionswörter und Phraseologisches contains functionwords and some phraseological items. The atlas is indispensable for everyone interested in the modern spoken Arabic language, as well as for dialectologists and for semanticists.
The Wortatlas der arabischen Dialekte / Word Atlas of Arabic Dialects (WAD) intends to provide an unprecedented survey of the lexical richness and diversity of the Arabic dialects as spoken from Uzbekistan to Mauretania and Nigeria, from Malta to Sudan, and including the Ki-Nubi Creole as spoken in Uganda and Kenya. The multilingual word atlas consists of four volumes in total with some 500 onomasiological maps in full colour. Each map presents a topic or notion and its equivalents in Arabic as collected from the dialectological literature (dictionaries, grammars, text collections, ethnographic reports, etc.), from the editors’ own field work, from questionnaires filled out by native speakers or by experts for a certain dialect region, and also from the internet. Polyglot legends in German, English, French, Spanish, Italian accompany the maps to facilitate further access. Each map is followed by a commentary in German, providing more details about the sources and the individual forms, and discussing semantic and etymological issues. All quotations are in their original language. The maps mainly show lexical types, detailed and concrete forms are given in the commentaries. An introduction is provided in Volume 1 in both German and English. Indices of all lexemes in the atlas will be available for each volume.
The first volume Band I: Mensch, Natur, Fauna und Flora / Volume 1: Mankind, Nature, Fauna and Flora contains subjects such as ‘family members’, ‘professions’, ‘human qualities’.
The second volume, Band II: Materielle Kultur, deals with material culture (‘house’, ‘utensils’, ‘food’, ‘clothing’, ‘vehicles’, etc.).
The third volume Band III: Verben, Adjektive, Zeit und Zahlen focuses on verbs, and adjectives.
The forth volume Band IV: Funktionswörter und Phraseologisches contains functionwords and some phraseological items.
The atlas is indispensable for everyone interested in the modern spoken Arabic language, as well as for dialectologists and for semanticists.
(Maqālīd al-ʿulūm) A Gift for the Muzaffarid Shāh Shujāʿ on the Definitions of Technical Terms
Maqālīd al-ʿulūm (Keys to the Sciences) is a significant source on definitions of Arabic scientific terms in the post-classical period. Composed by an anonymous author, it contains over eighteen hundred definitions in the realm of twenty-one religious, literary, and rational sciences. The work was dedicated to the Muzaffarid Shāh Shujāʿ, who ruled over Shiraz and its neighbouring regions from 759/1358 to 786/1384. The present volume contains a critical edition of Maqālīd al-ʿulūm based on its three extant manuscripts. In the introduction, the editors review previous scholarship on the text, present an overview of patronage at the court of Shāh Shujāʿ and identify some of the sources used by the author of the work. They suggest that the work in its structure mirrors Abū ʿAbdullāh Khwārazmī’s Mafātīḥ al-ʿulūm, completed in 366/976.
This atlas is based on large-scale fieldwork conducted in Galilee in the mid-nineties of last century. Galilee is the area with the highest percentage of arabophones in Israel and displays a rather complex dialectal situation. The reshuffling of large parts of the population after 1948 led to a considerable degree of dialectal diversity in many places. Moreover, many points of investigation show, besides the notorious Bedouin-sedentary dichotomy, a significant sociolinguistic variation with respect to age, sex, and denomination.The atlas contains seventy-three phonetic and phonologial maps, in addition to eighty morphological and thirty-eight lexical maps.Ten maps deal with the classification of the dialects.The atlas is of interest to semitists, dialectologists and variationists.
Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Fascicle 14, ب to بين
From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations.
Authors: Maria Bulakh and Leonid Kogan
The Arabic-Ethiopic Glossary by al-Malik al-Afḍal by Maria Bulakh and Leonid Kogan is a detailed annotated edition of a unique monument of Late Medieval Arabic lexicography, comprising 475 Arabic lexemes (some of them post-classical Yemeni dialectisms) translated into several Ethiopian idioms and put down in Arabic letters in a late-fourteenth century manuscript from a codex in a private Yemeni collection. For the many languages involved, the Glossary provides the earliest written records, by several centuries pre-dating the most ancient attestations known so far. The edition, preceded by a comprehensive linguistic introduction, gives a full account of the comparative material from all known Ethiopian Semitic languages. A detailed index ensures the reader’s orientation in the lexical treasures revealed from the Glossary.
Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Fascicle 13, بيت TO بين
From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations.
Author: Peter Behnstedt
Editor / Translator: Gwendolin Goldbloom
Since the author's publication of Die nordjemenitischen Dialekte. Teil 1: Atlas in 1985, a lot of new field work has been done in North Yemen and adjacent areas with new data especially from the extreme north of Yemen and neighbouring areas in Saudi Arabia. These are considered to be the most archaic Arabic dialect areas. The publication of a new atlas of the region in English therefore suggested itself. The atlas consists of 192 fully coloured maps with 30 phonetical and phonological maps, 100 morphological and 60 lexical ones. Depending on the subject the maps are accompanied by shorter or longer commentaries and paradigms. The book is of interest to Arabists, Semitists and dialectologists.
The Wortatlas der arabischen Dialekte / Word Atlas of Arabic Dialects (WAD) intends to provide an unprecedented survey of the lexical richness and diversity of the Arabic dialects as spoken from Uzbekistan to Mauretania and Nigeria, from Malta to Sudan, and including the Ki-Nubi Creole as spoken in Uganda and Kenya. The multilingual word atlas consists of four volumes in total with some 500 onomasiological maps in full colour. Each map presents a topic or notion and its equivalents in Arabic as collected from the dialectological literature (dictionaries, grammars, text collections, ethnographic reports, etc.), from the editors’ own field work, from questionnaires filled out by native speakers or by experts for a certain dialect region, and also from the internet. Polyglot legends in German, English, French, Spanish, Italian accompany the maps to facilitate further access. Each map is followed by a commentary in German, providing more details about the sources and the individual forms, and discussing semantic and etymological issues. All quotations are in their original language. The maps mainly show lexical types, detailed and concrete forms are given in the commentaries. An introduction is provided in Volume 1 in both German and English. Indices of all lexemes in the atlas will be available for each volume.
The first volume Band I: Mensch, Natur, Fauna und Flora / Volume 1: Mankind, Nature, Fauna and Flora contains subjects such as ‘family members’, ‘professions’, ‘human qualities’.
The second volume, Band II: Materielle Kultur, deals with material culture (‘house’, ‘utensils’, ‘food’, ‘clothing’, ‘vehicles’, etc.).
The third volume Band III: Verben, Adjektive, Zeit und Zahlen focuses on verbs, and adjectives.
The forth volume Band IV: Funktionswörter und Phraseologisches contains functionwords and some phraseological items.
The atlas is indispensable for everyone interested in the modern spoken Arabic language, as well as for dialectologists and for semanticists.