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The study of Islamicate intellectual history has witnessed a rapid growth of scholarship on post-classical thinkers and especially on Fakhr al-Dīn al-Rāzī (d. 1210 CE), one of the leading theologians and philosophers of his time. However, there is presently a lack of methodological tools and reference works in Rāzī studies. This book is the first bibliographical work entirely devoted to this thinker. It surveys the modern historiography on Rāzī from the nineteenth century onward and includes more than 1000 specialized entries written in European languages, Arabic, Persian, and Turkish. The bibliography also provides a preface, an introductory essay, annotations to the entries, and various indices to help students and experts navigate the complex field of Rāzī studies.
Written by the poet-painter Karel van Mander, who finished it in June 1603, the Grondt der edel, vry schilderconst (Foundation of the Noble, Free Art of Painting) was the first systematic treatise on schilderconst (the art of painting / picturing) to be published in Dutch (Haarlem: Paschier van Wes[t]busch, 1604). This English-language edition of the Grondt, accompanied by an introductory monograph and a full critical apparatus, provides unprecedented access to Van Mander’s crucially important art treatise. The book sheds light on key terms and critical categories such as schilder, manier, uyt zijn selven doen, welstandt, leven and gheest, and wel schilderen, and both exemplifies and explicates the author’s distinctive views on the complementary forms and functions of history and landscape.
Lawāmiʿ al-Naẓar fī Taḥqīq Maʿānī al-Mukhtaṣar is Aḥmad b. Yaʿqūb al-Wallālī's (d. 1128/1716) commentary on al-Sanūsī's (d. 895/1490) compendium of logic, al-Mukhtaṣar. Al-Wallālī was the first commentator on al-Sanūsī's compendium after the author's autocommentary. In this publication, Ibrahim Safri offers a critical edition of this work, together with a study of the author's life and oeuvre.
Safri also tries to show the indirect influence of Avicennism on logic in the Maghribī tradition in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. On the basis of his writings on logic and philosophical theology, al-Wallālī was considered a master of rational sciences by his contemporaries.
Editor / Translator: Oliver Kahl
ʿAlī ibn Sahl Rabban aṭ-Ṭabarī's Indian Books, completed in the year 850 CE as an appendix to his medico-philosophical chef-d'œuvre "Paradise of Wisdom", belong to the most remarkable texts in Arabic scientific literature. The Indian Books offer a unique, interpretative summary of the main tenets of Ayurvedic medicine, as understood by Arabic-speaking scholars on the basis of now lost translations from Sanskrit. The present book centres around a critical edition and annotated translation of this crucial text, framed by a detailed introduction and extensive glossaries of terms. Ṭabarī's learned exposé of Ayurveda also throws a more nuanced light on the allegedly uncontested supremacy of Greek humoralism in 9th-century Arabic medicine.
The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History offers 400 years of early modern history in one work. Experts from all over the world have joined in a presentation of the scholarship on the great era between the mid-15th to the mid-19th centuries. The perspective is European. That does not mean, however, that the view on the rest of the world is blocked. On the contrary: the multifaceted interrelatedness of European and other cultures is scrutinized extensively.

The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History addresses major historical questions:
- which ideas, inventions, and events changed people’s lives?
- in which ways did living conditions change?
- how do political, social, and economic developments interlock?
- which major cultural currents have begun to become apparent?
- how did historical interpretation of certain phenomena change?
The individual articles are connected to one another as in a web of red threads. The reader who follows the threads will keep coming upon new
and unexpected contexts and links.
The Fatimid Egyptian Convert Who Shaped Christian Views of Islam
Author: David Bertaina
Būluṣ ibn Rajāʾ (ca. 955–ca. 1020) was a celebrated writer of Coptic Christianity from Fatimid Egypt. Born to an influential Muslim family in Cairo, Ibn Rajāʾ later converted to Christianity and composed The Truthful Exposer (Kitāb al-Wāḍiḥ bi-l-Ḥaqq) outlining his skepticism regarding Islam. His ideas circulated across the Middle East and the Mediterranean in the medieval period, shaping the Christian understanding of the Qurʾan’s origins, Muḥammad’s life, the practice of Islamic law, and Muslim political history. This book includes a study of Ibn Rajāʾ’s life, along with an Arabic edition and English translation of The Truthful Exposer.
In Alfonso de Cartagena’s 'Memoriale virtutum' (1422), María Morrás and Jeremy Lawrance offer a critical edition of an anthology of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, compiled and significantly altered by the major Castilian intellectual of the day, Bishop Alfonso de Cartagena, and addressed to the heir to the throne of Portugal, Crown Prince Duarte.
The work is a speculum principis, an education of a future king in the virtues suitable to a statesman. Cartagena’s choice of Aristotle was a harbinger of Renaissance ideas. The “memorial” sheds light on a society in transition, setting new ethical guidelines for the ruling class at the crossroads between medieval feudalism and Renaissance absolutism.