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Mapping Greece, 1420-1800: A History

Maps in the Margarita Samourkas Collection

George Tolias

Mapping Greeceis a richly illustrated history of the cartography of Greece during the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, based on the Margarita Samourka Map Collection (one of the most important collections of its kind in private hands in Greece) that consists of 1,700 maps of Greece. Divided into five chapters, the book contains an introduction, conclusions, and an appendix.
Summarizing the foundations of the mapping of Greece as established by the classical and medieval cartographic tradition with the Ptolemaic revival, the maritime portolan chart, the mappa mundi, and the local cartography of early humanism, this book shows the rise and development of the regional concept of Greece and its establishment of cartographic conventions. Various chapters discuss the standardization of the regional maps of Greece in "the age of the atlas," an era of commercialization of the printed map, and the wide dissemination of these maps. Four prefaces written by George Tolias, Paschallis M. Kitromildes, Christos G. Zacharakis, and Margarita Samourkas discuss each one's thoughts on this ambitious and comprehensive project.
Also discussed is the application of modern surveying technology to the mapping of Greece, the work of astronomers and mariners, topographical commentaries, and the production of maps of ancient geography and historical maps of Greece from the end of the sixteenth century onwards. Richly illustrated in a large format, with an overwhelming number of beautiful maps illustrations, Mapping Greece contains a detailed catalogue of the maps in the Margarita Samourka collection compiled by Leonora Navari. The Margarita Samourka collection includes maps of all parts of Greece and of historical Greek regions. It is significant for its breadth and its chronological development beginning with Italian map engravers and publishers of the sixteenth century to the French reformation of cartography in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Finally, the book provides an overall summary of the series of definitions and perceptions of Greece which emerge in the maps of the region during the centuries of foreign domination, and an assessment of the contribution of maps of Greece to the general history of cartography.

Hendrik D.L. Vervliet

In the course of the early sixteenth century the printed book decoration underwent a double metamorphosis. First stylistically, through the replacement of the previous medieval mostly floral embellishments by new motifs copied from Islamic or Byzantine sources, or borrowed from antiquity. Second technically, by the gradual inclusion of cast ornaments into the printer's bills-of-fount. They increasingly replaced the prestigious, sumptuous and time-consuming hand-painted illumination and decoration, or the less costly and sometimes crude woodcut techniques.
This survey focuses on one pattern of these Renaissance ornaments, namely the vine leaf, or as it is commonly known, the "Aldine" leaf. The design is also known as an ivy leaf or, as palaeographers and some typographers call it, a hedera or floral heart.
As a cast sort the vine leaf was introduced in the early sixteenth-century. It became rapidly one of the most favoured decorative designs in Renaissance typography and has remained a steadfast sort in a printer's case since then. The motif has mainly been studied from a designer's point of view, but a more bibliographically oriented survey seems to be missing. To fill up this void this survey aims to register all sixteenth-century sorts known.
Next to a facsimile in true scale, the bibliography contains the punchcutter's name, the size, occurrences, type-specimens, preserved artefacts and notes.

Women in Revolutionary Debate

Female Novelists from Burney to Austen

Stephanie Russo

In the later eighteenth and earlier nineteenth centuries novels were believed to have the power to shape and/or change behaviour, and, by implication, affect the political landscape of society on a large scale. The English response to the French Revolution can be traced through a reading of the novels of the period. The French Revolution in itself was indelibly associated with the domestic arena, and, thus, by extension, with women. Again and again in novels of the period, and particularly in women's novels, the stability, or otherwise, of the family reflects the stability of government and of the nation. It was through the medium of the novel that women could enter the debate on revolution, using their novels as means through which to explore many of the dominant social and political issues of the day.
The novel, more often than not set in the family home, was a medium uniquely suited to an exploration of revolutionary ideologies in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The emerging form of the novel offered a unique opportunity for women to present new, challenging perspectives on the revolutionary crisis of the 1790s. The works of Frances Burney, Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, Maria Edgeworth, Mrs Bullock and Jane Austen, all occupy an important place in this debate, and indeed, in the history of the novel. They demonstrate that women were at the forefront of development of the form of the novel itself.

Series:

Peter C.J. van der Krogt and Elger Heere

In the 16th, 17th and 18th century the Netherlands had a thriving map production and publishing industry. Johannes Blaeu and Abraham Ortelius are, among others, important names regarding the history of the Dutch cartographic industry. The maps produced in these three centruries are now relatively rare and highly sougth after by a large communicty of collectors, map curators, dealers of antiquities and enthusiasts. The series will give the reader clear, short, no-nonsense yet academically valid information about all Dutch atlas maps regarding a certain country or earea. e.g. England, Germany, France, etc. Each part will mainly address the edition of the atlas(es) in which the maps have been incorporated, the year of publication of the maps, the known states, cartographic references and remarks by the author.

This first volume of the Guides to Dutch Atlas Maps series offers a descriptive catalogue of all the maps of England, and particular parts of the country, published in Dutch atlases between 1570 and 1650. All the maps in the atlases of Ortelius, Mercator-Hondius, Janssonius, Blaeu and their followers are recorded.

Line, Shade and Shadow

The Fabrication and Preservation of Architectural Drawings

Lois Olcott Price

As documents of the built environment, as source material for architectural historians and preservation architects, and as stunning works of art, architectural drawings serve a wide and diverse audience.
This book explores the materials and techniques used in their fabrication while illustrating their evolution from the eighteenth through the twentieth century. In addition to documenting the drafting process, this exploration also contributes to an understanding of the development of architectural design, the architectural profession, and the manufacturers that served its drafting and reprographic needs.
Because architectural drawings survive in great numbers and in large, often unstable formats, preservation and access issues present major challenges for institutions that hold research collections. This book provides a comprehensive look at both the problems and the solutions. It is beautifully illustrated with examples from major collections and includes extensive source citations.
The first three chapters discuss: the development of drafting-specific drawing, detail, and tracing papers and cloths; the changing media and techniques used in drafting, rendering, and mounting working, detail, and presentation drawings; the use of drawing instruments and correction and copying methods; and the introduction, development, and identification of blueprints and other photo-reproduction processes, including the history, chemistry, and working procedure for each process. The fourth and final chapter includes: an introduction to preservation, collection management, storage, and exhibition specifically for architectural drawings and photo-reproductions; and descriptions of specific conservation treatments with an assessment of their appropriateness for different deterioration issues and types of drawings.

The University of Mary Washington Center for Historic Preservation has awarded the 2011 Historic Preservation Book Prize to Line, Shade and Shadow: The Fabrication and Preservation of Architectural Drawings by Lois Olcott Price.

Series:

Paula van Gestel-Van het Schip, Joop Kaashoek, Jaap Molenaar, Rob J. Poelijoe, Henk Schipper and Hans van der Zwan

The decision to embark on researching maps in books has resulted in a publication, presenting an unique combination of maps, plans and views. It concerns those, tucked away in historical and geographical works on Russia and Poland, prior to 1800 and published in the Netherlands. Both maps and books are elaborately described, analysed and indexed; much attention has been lavished on their authors, engravers and publishers to boot. The cartographic subdivision of the maps according to their regions brings to light the specific interrelation between the various works by differing authors.
The comprehensive introduction describes the history of Russia and Poland from various points of view for specific subjects and comes richly illustrated with over 100 images. The cartobibliography contains illustrations for each of the over 700 maps described and the bibliography features a large number of title pages and portraits in addition. This unusual combination of research objectives should appeal to map and book historians and collectors alike. A large folding view of the city of Moscow by Cornelis de Bruijn (1711) has been added in facsimile at the back of this publication. Summaries in Russian and Polish complete this publication.
In English with Polish and Russian summary.
Maps in Books of Russia and Poland is part 13 of the Utrecht Studies on the History of Cartography (Explokart).

Ortelius Atlas Maps

An Illustrated Guide. Second Revised Edition

M. van den Broecke

This renowned book has been out of print for a couple of years, but a second, corrected, revised and grangerized edition is now available. This very practical and informative manual gives an extensive overview and a description of all the maps that appeared in the famous first atlas by Abraham Ortelius, the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 and all later editions. The book gives illustrated information on every map of the various editions that have appeared of the Ortelius Atlas and provides valuable information on the dating, number of copies printed, editions and the origin of the maps. Titles pages and portraits of Ortelius are also extensively described.

Agnes M.L. Kerssemakers

Collected and described by Agnes M. L. Kerssemakers.
In this extensive catalogue the author describes some 9,000 printed books, pamphlets, papers, periodicals, almanacks, broadsides, posters, prints, caricatures, photographs, manuscripts and memorabilia which were collected by her over the course of many years.
This is a collection of mainly ad hoc propaganda and enlightenment, but also entertainment like songs and literature, including editions of almost the entire Malik-Verlag. Complemented with pictorial surveys of social bodies or activities, as well as the great works of the social Fathers, like Babeuf, Morelly, Rousseau, Moses Hess, Flora Tristan, Marx and Lenin. The catalogue has been enriched with 161 full colour illustrations.

Series:

Edited by Koert van der Horst

In 2011 we have completed one of our most prestigious projects; the publication of the facsimile of the Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem bound in eight volumes. To celebrate this occasion we have published an accompanying publication with background information on the Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem and the production of the facsimile.
In this book, various experts on the Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem describe the many aspects of this unique compilation atlas from the 17th century. The book contains contributions by Roelof van Gelder on the Atlas of Laurens van de Hem and his library, a detailed description of the life and works of the collector and the making of his Atlas; Truusje Goedings on the coloration of the Atlas; Erlend de Groot on the art historical aspects of a series of drawings from the Atlas; Peter van der Krogt on the Atlas Maior by Blaeu, which served as the point of departure for the Atlas; Benjamin Schmidt on the printed maps from the Atlas, and Dick Gaasbeek on the making of the facsimile of the Atlas, including a detailed description of the photography, the printing and the binding. Together with an introduction by Günter Schilder, this book further contains a catalogue with the numbers and titles of, and brief information on all the maps and images present in the 8 volumes of the facsimile.
Extend your series of the catalogue of the Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem of the Austrian Library. Illustrated and annotated catalogue, now with an additional 8th volume about the history of the history of the Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem and the challenges of making the facsimile.

See also: http://www.blaeuvanderhem.com

The History of the Library in Western Civilization, Volume IV

From Cassiodorus to Furnival: Classical and Christian Letters, Schools and Libraries in the Monasteries and Universities, Western Book Centres

Series:

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

This work is the fourth part in an important, five-volume series addressing the unique role libraries have played in building and preserving Western culture. Mr. Staikos has become one of our foremost scholars on library history, writing such books as this as well as works like "The Great Libraries," a classic in its field.
This fourth volume discusses the publishing procedure for secular and religious writings of late antiquity and the factors that led to the impoverishment of the monumental libraries in Rome. New centers of learning grew up in the monasteries, where great libraries containing educational and instructive books and representative works of Christian literature came into being. Monastic libraries were founded throughout Europe, including the regions with Celtic and Anglo-Saxon populations: those at Monte Cassino, Bobbio, St. Gallen, Fulda, Cluny and elsewhere are dealt with extensively. Mention is also made of the libraries founded in universities and of the new philosophy of forming school libraries, as in Bologna and Paris.