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Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

This examines the papyrus books collected by Plato himself, a habit which began when he was still 'studying' under Socrates and continued throughout his years of teaching in the Academy. The book deals extensively with the works of the Ionian and Eleatic Natural Philosophers, as well as of the Pyhagoreans, which informed the composition of Plato's Dialogues. Furthermore, through this process the fabric of Sophistic literature composed at Athens is unfolded and the pioneers who introduced the study of Mathematics in the Academy are discussed in brief. Finally, a large chapter in the book deals with the architecture of the Academy, including topographical surveys and scale plans which reveal interesting facts about the ideas that went into its design, and the use of its facilities.

Finding their Way at Sea

The Story of the Portolan Charts, the Cartographers Who Drew Them and the Mariners Who Sailed by Them

Richard Pflederer

With an introduction by Tony Campbell.
The story of sea charts, of manuscript portolan charts in particular, is a story intimately intertwined with the history of the western world during some of the most significant and eventful periods of recorded history. Through these astonishingly beautiful and functional charts, we can trace developments in trade and warfare, exploration and colonial domination from the late medieval period through the Renaissance and into the Age of European Enlightenment.
Beginning with their introduction in the late thirteenth century, these sometimes quaintly fanciful portolan charts enjoyed an important place in the navigator's sea chest until they were finally superceded in the eighteenth century by their cheaper but far less charming printed cousins. In the mid-fifteenth century when the Europeans first ventured beyond their home waters and into the open oceans, their successes and their sometimes-heroic failures were documented on charts of the newly discovered oceans and coasts. These new charts, although depicting faraway coasts and employing the latest navigational techniques, were drawn on vellum in the same style as Mediterranean Sea charts. They served the dual purposes of recording information gleaned from previous voyages and guiding the mariners of subsequent voyages.

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan

A Historical Introduction and Cartobibliography of European Printed Maps of Japan before 1800

Series:

Jason C. Hubbard

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan systematically categorizes and provides an overview of all the European printed maps of Japan published to 1800. The author has undertaken a review of the literature, conducted an exhaustive investigation in major libraries and private collections, analyzed these findings and then compiled information on 125 maps of Japan. The introduction contains information about the mapping to 1800, the typology of Japan by western cartographers, an overview on geographical names on early modern western maps of Japan and a presentation of the major cartographic models developed for this book.

In English with Japanese summary.

Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici. New Edition. Vol. IV A (2 Vols.)

The "Galérie agréable du monde" by Pieter van der Aa (1728)

Series:

Peter C.J. van der Krogt

This latest part of the Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici series contains the description of one single "atlas" only: the Galérie agréable du monde, published by Pieter van der Aa in Leiden in 1728. The work is described page-by-page in the form of a catalogue. Every description is accompanied by a small photo. Large-format digital photographs of all the sheets – both textual and graphic – have been placed on the accompanying DVD, so that this volume is in effect a digital facsimile of the Galérie agréable.
In two volumes.

Hendrik D.L. Vervliet

In the course of the early sixteenth century the printed book decoration underwent a double metamorphosis. First stylistically, through the replacement of the previous medieval mostly floral embellishments by new motifs copied from Islamic or Byzantine sources, or borrowed from antiquity. Second technically, by the gradual inclusion of cast ornaments into the printer's bills-of-fount. They increasingly replaced the prestigious, sumptuous and time-consuming hand-painted illumination and decoration, or the less costly and sometimes crude woodcut techniques.
This survey focuses on one pattern of these Renaissance ornaments, namely the vine leaf, or as it is commonly known, the "Aldine" leaf. The design is also known as an ivy leaf or, as palaeographers and some typographers call it, a hedera or floral heart.
As a cast sort the vine leaf was introduced in the early sixteenth-century. It became rapidly one of the most favoured decorative designs in Renaissance typography and has remained a steadfast sort in a printer's case since then. The motif has mainly been studied from a designer's point of view, but a more bibliographically oriented survey seems to be missing. To fill up this void this survey aims to register all sixteenth-century sorts known.
Next to a facsimile in true scale, the bibliography contains the punchcutter's name, the size, occurrences, type-specimens, preserved artefacts and notes.

Ortelius Atlas Maps

An Illustrated Guide. Second Revised Edition

M. van den Broecke

This renowned book has been out of print for a couple of years, but a second, corrected, revised and grangerized edition is now available. This very practical and informative manual gives an extensive overview and a description of all the maps that appeared in the famous first atlas by Abraham Ortelius, the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 and all later editions. The book gives illustrated information on every map of the various editions that have appeared of the Ortelius Atlas and provides valuable information on the dating, number of copies printed, editions and the origin of the maps. Titles pages and portraits of Ortelius are also extensively described.

Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici. New Edition. Vol. IV (3 Vols.)

The Town Atlases, Braun & Hogenberg, Janssonius, Blaeu, De Wit/Mortier and Others

Series:

Peter C.J. van der Krogt

Descriptive and illustrated bibliography of all town atlases by Braun & Hogenberg, Blaeu, Janssonius, De Wit and other Dutch publishers.
Three volumes.

The Medieval Book

Glosses from Friends & Colleagues of Christopher de Hamel

Edited by Richard A. Linenthal, James H. Marrow and William Noel

This book was presented on the occasion of Christopher de Hamel's sixtieth birthday, and celebrates his many accomplishments during his years at Sotheby's and more recently as the Gaylord Donnelley Fellow Librarian of the Parker Library at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Christopher de Hamel has described more medieval manuscripts than any other living scholar, and the sale catalogues that have come from his hands set new standards of quality and stimulated new generations of collectors, both institutional and private. This book is a tribute to his learning, his industry, imagination, spirit and good fellowship and his capacity to inspire others. Among the contributors are collectors, colleagues, librarians, curators, students of book history and scholars. The contributions are divided under the rubrics Books, The Book Trade and Collectors and Collecting, composing a varied collection of 40 highly interesting articles, including an introduction on Christopher de Hamel and a bibliography of his writings.

Printed Cookbooks in Europe, 1470-1700

A Bibliography of Early Modern Culinary Literature

Henry Notaker

First edition. This is the first bibliography to list all known editions of printed cookbooks published in Europe before 1700. More than a hundred titles in at least 650 editions were printed in fourteen different languages. Some household encyclopedias with culinary sections have also been included. Many of the editions described have never before been listed in modern bibliographies.
Cookbooks from this period are no longer only of interest to collectors and antiquarians. Food history is taught as an academic subject in an increasing number of universities, and this bibliography will be a useful tool for students of culinary literature, as a source for the history of cuisine and food culture. Also, book and literary historians are turning their attention to different forms of non-fiction that had not been properly studied until now: practical handbooks and didactic "how-to" books, of which cookbooks are distinctive examples. Information provided here about the locations of known copies, modern reprints, and facsimile editions will facilitate these studies.
The bibliography gives the full title and physical description of each work. Annotations provide details about contents, biographical data about authors and publishers, information about the sources of the recipes, translations, and plagiarisms. A historical introduction analyzes the development of the cookbook as a genre during the first two centuries of printing, with reference to authorship, publishing history, didactic methods, culinary processes, and differences in gender.

Courtiers and Cannibals, Angels and Amazons

The Art of the Decorative Cartographic Titlepage

Rodney Shirley

This book aims to preserve and bring forward for wider appreciation the outstanding works of art that many engraved titlepages and frontispieces represent.
Over the time period covered by the present publication – roughly from the 1470s to the 1870s – very many printed books opened with an attractive decorative titlepage or frontispiece; sometimes both. In this book a limited selection has been made from the extremely wide field of known titlepages, mainly by a focus on subject matter which is primarily cartography, geography, history and topography, together with associated disciplines such as astronomy, travel and exploration. A selection of 100 main and approx. 70 supplementary entries adequately covers specimens of different styles, formats, and national characteristics over a four-hundred year time period from the late 15th century onwards. The choice of decorative titlepages or frontispieces includes examples emanating from Italy, Germany (including Switzerland and Austria), the Netherlands (including Flanders), France, Spain, England and some later examples published in the United States.