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Brill’s Companions to European History is a peer reviewed series research companions providing high-level and up-to-date surveys of themes, persons, movements, currents, events in European history from 400 AD to the present. Written by the foremost specialists in the respective fields, they offer balanced accounts, along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. The books are normally multi-author volumes, thoroughly planned out at an editorial level to ensure comprehensiveness and cohesion, maximising their value to the student and scholar.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.

"Brill's Companions to European History have become essential research guides to cardinal topics in the field." - Robert Jones Clines, in: Journal of Jesuit Studies, 6 (2019)
European Expansion and Indigenous Response is a peer-reviewed book series that seeks to understand the process of European expansion, interchange and connectivity in a global context in the early modern and modern period. It will seek to understand this transformative process and period in cultural, economic, social, and ideological terms in Africa, the Indian Ocean, Central and East Asia and the Pacific Rim. This series will provide a forum for varied scholarly work - original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources translations - on these exciting global mixtures and their impact on culture, politics and society in the period from the Portuguese navigators of the late fifteenth century until the end of ‘Company’ rule in British India in the mid-nineteenth century. It will move beyond the traditional isolated and nation bound historiographical emphases of this field which have isolated continents and nation-states and toward a broader intellectual terrain, encouraging whenever possible non-European perspectives. It will also encourage a wider disciplinary approach to early modern studies. Themes in this series will include the exchange of ideas and products, especially through the medium of trading companies; the exchange of religions and traditions; the transfer of technologies; the development of new forms of political, social and economic policy, as well as identity formation. It will seek out studies that employ diverse forms of analysis from all scholarly disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, history, (including the history of science), linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, and religious studies. In addition, it will include works translated from French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor George Bryan Souza or the Publisher at Brill Wendel Scholma.


Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 2,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Abstract

This article introduces the new dataset Cohort Component Population Estimates for Ireland, 1911–1920 (www.doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-854673). The dataset provides vital statistics and cohort component population estimates at a spatially-disaggregated level for the island of Ireland for the period 1911–1920. The raw data were digitised by the authors using official UK government statistics. The population estimates were then derived by the cohort component method. These data provide novel intercensal population estimates at the county level that will be beneficial for researchers working in historical demography, as well as in economic and social history. The data provided can be readily reused and extended by other researchers to produce further series and indicators. An example application of the data in this manner is , who combine these population estimates with mortality statistics from the Spanish flu pandemic to demonstrate how demographic composition affects the interpretation of data on public health crises.

Open Access
In: Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences
History of European Political and Constitutional Thought is a peer-reviewed series of monographs, edited collections, and newly edited primary sources. It promotes the study of European traditions of political and constitutional thought from classical antiquity to the twentieth century. The series brings to its geographical, historical and thematic focus the full range of methods established in the field, from contributions on the conventional canon to comparative, transnational, global and critical approaches, while also aiming to foster new methodologies.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Publisher at Brill Wendel Scholma.


Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.
Free access
In: Frankokratia

Editors’ Abstract

Because the subject of the previous contribution, Chrysovalantis Kyriacou’s “The Cypriot Peasant Revolt of 1426. Mentalities and Resistance in the Eastern Mediterranean,” is complex, controversial, and current in Cypriot politics and society, the author, the journal editors, and the three external readers agreed to reveal their identities and to establish a dialogue in the following manner: once Dr Kyriacou had revised his paper on the basis of the comments of the referees, they would write a companion article from their perspective. In this response, Grivaud, Nicolaou-Konnari, and Trélat argue that, given that the absence of revolts led by the Greek population of Cyprus during the island’s Lusignan rule (1192-1474/89) has fuelled many debates amongst scholars, it is not surprising that the so-called “Cypriot Peasant Revolt” of 1426-1427, an unicum, acquires the characteristics of mythology if interpreted to represent the emergence of the Greek peasantry as a political actor, inspired by the intention to overturn the equilibrium established on the island since Richard the Lionheart’s conquest. They thus offer what they term a detached assessment of the meagre historical evidence.

In: Frankokratia
Author: Philippe Devaux

Résumé

La parution posthume des Inséparables invite à distinguer les deux modalités d’ écriture par lesquelles Beauvoir a fait revivre la figure majeure pour elle de Zaza (1907-1929), son amie d’ enfance et de jeunesse : la fiction puis l’ autobiographie ; et cela à la lumière des appréciations de l’ autrice et du pacte de lecture propre à chaque modalité d’ écriture. Ces approches successives sur plusieurs décennies témoignent de la fascination constante de Beauvoir pour Zaza et incitent le lecteur à prolonger l’ exploration beauvoirienne par les écrits mêmes de Zaza.

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
Author: Debra Bergoffen

Abstract

Two crises of our age, refugee statelessness and sexual violence, converge in the lives of refugee women. This article examines this convergence by analyzing the meanings of refugee-camp sexual aggression and refugee women’s responses to it. Aligning Giorgio Agamben’s and Hannah Arendt’s ideas of refugee desubjectification with Simone de Beauvoir’s concept of gendered subjectivity, the author argues that refugee-camp men use sexual violence to reinstate their gendered subjectivity. In rejecting men’s demand that women accept their prerefugee, compromised subjectivity, refugee-camp women are rewriting the gendered subjectivity contract.

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies