Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Inclusive Education x
  • Culture & Education x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All Modify Search

Reel Big Bullies

Teaching to the Problem

Series:

Brian C. Johnson and James E. Vines

Talk with students about bullying in their schools/communities and three themes are likely to emerge: a) there’s nothing anyone can do about it, b) bullying is necessary as it builds character, and c) there needs to be more educational programming in the schools designed to curb bullying behavior.

Contrast those sentiments with the helplessness teachers and administrators feel. Many will tell you that current state and federal guidelines tie their hands until after an incident occurs. In other words, a student must get hurt before the school is able to do anything. Reel Big Bullies is designed for regular anti-bullying campaigns and will not cost struggling districts thousands of dollars to implement as it provides teachers with educational resources to complement regular instruction in classrooms.

Using clips from Hollywood blockbusters like Knocked Up, The Emperor’s New Groove, The Benchwarmers and others, Reel Big Bullies is designed to help students, administrators, teachers and counselors create a safer school environment for all students. It is also intended to help all students understand the terrible toll bullying can take on its targets, and to encourage students to stand up for their classmates who are being bullied.

The book’s framework follows the three themes above and discusses the pertinent legal and policy decisions affecting educational intervention. With the already busy (overwhelmed) teacher in mind, we describe nearly 200 film clips teachers can show in class to promote and spark discussions with students in middle and high schools.

Places of Privilege

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Identities, Change and Resistance

Series:

Edited by Nicole Oke, Christopher Sonn and Alison Baker

Places of Privilege examines dynamics of privilege and power in the construction of place in a period of the rapid social transformation of places, borders and boundaries. Drawing on inter-disciplinary perspectives, the book examines place as a site for the making and re-making of privilege, while considering new meanings of community, and examining spaces for cultural identity and resistance. Chapters point to a range of conceptual resources that can be utilised to produce critical analyses of place-making. As the authors point out, power and privilege shape place but these dynamics are in turn shaped by the specific place based histories and social dynamics within which they are located.

Contributors are: Lutfiye Ali, Alison M. Baker, Paola Bilbrough, Tony Birch, Jora Broerse, Sally Clark, Josephine Cornell, Yon Hsu, Lou Iaquinto, Karen Jackson, Shose Kessi, Rebecca Lyons, Chris McConville, Nicole Oke, Amy Quayle, Alexandra Ramirez, Kopano Ratele, Christopher C. Sonn, and Ramón Spaaij.

Series:

Edited by Shibao Guo and Lloyd Wong

Canada’s history, since its birth as a nation one hundred and fifty years ago, is one of immigration, nation-building, and contested racial and ethnic relations. In Immigration, Racial and Ethnic Studies in 150 Years of Canada: Retrospects and Prospects scholars provide a wide-ranging overview of this history with a core theme being one of enduring racial and ethnic conflict and inequality. The volume is organized around four themes where in each theme selected racial and ethnic issues are examined critically. Part 1 focuses on the history of Canadian immigration and nation-building while Part 2 looks at situating contemporary Canada in terms of the debates in the literature on ethnicity and race. Part 3 revisits specific racial and ethnic studies in Canada and finally in Part 4 a state-of-the-art is provided on immigration and racial and ethnic studies while providing prospects for the future.

Contributors are: Victor Armony, David Este, Augie Fleras, Peter R. Grant, Shibao Guo, Abdolmohammad Kazemipur, Anne-Marie Livingstone, Adina Madularea, Ayesha Mian Akram, Nilum Panesar, Yolande Pottie-Sherman, Paul Pritchard, Howard Ramos, Daniel W. Robertson, Vic Satzewich, Morton Weinfeld, Rima Wilkes, Lori Wilkinson, Elke Winter, Nelson Wiseman, Lloyd Wong, and Henry Yu.

Counter-Hegemonic Teaching

Counter-Hegemonic Perspectives for Teaching Social Studies, the Foundations, Special Education Inclusion, and Multiculturalism

Series:

Lee Elliot Fleischer

We've Scene it All Before

Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training

Series:

Brian C. Johnson

A revolutionary tool for corporate and academic trainers, We’ve Scene It All Before harnesses the power of mainstream Hollywood film to enhance educational sessions about diversity and social justice. This resource manual offers practical guidance on how to effectively use the concept of difference as a starting point towards true inclusion.
Seasoned and novice trainers will appreciate the suggested strategies and best practices on facilitating diversity dialogues, which are coupled with a set of twenty-five definitions that introduce and raise awareness of the personal and systemic nature of difference, discrimination, and power. Workshops on human relations and workplace diversity must move beyond the superficial “celebration” of diversity to the dismantling of systems of privilege and oppression that create environments where members of the organization are disenfranchised and disempowered.
Using clips from a variety of genres of mainstream film allows the trainer to make intercultural concepts visible and offers a way for us to challenge our own values and assumptions. Participants will enjoy the presentations more as they view some of their favorite films in a whole new way; using this familiar medium creates a common basis for entering the discussions all the while giving us the permission to talk about serious and often controversial subjects.
We’ve Scene It All Before: Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training is a learning tool which will be tremendously useful in reducing resistance and increasing thoughtful cross-cultural dialogue.