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Volume-editor Giorgos Papantoniou, Demetrios Michaelides and Maria Dikomitou-Eliadou

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Volume-editor Giorgos Papantoniou, Demetrios Michaelides and Maria Dikomitou-Eliadou

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Roberta Menegazzi

Abstract

The excavations conducted during the last century at the site of Seleucia on the Tigris brought to light over 11,000 terracotta figurines that form an extraordinarily rich repertoire, originating from the dialogue between Greek and local traditions. Figurines from Seleucia highlight close contacts with terracottas coming from the eastern Mediterranean area, showing on the other hand an equally intense bond with Mesopotamian production. This paper aims to illustrate how the encounter and exchange between Greek and local culture led to the creation of a new iconographic and formal language, resulting in a dramatic renewal of the old Mesopotamian repertoire and in a deep re-elaboration of western subjects.

Series:

Volume-editor Giorgos Papantoniou, Demetrios Michaelides and Maria Dikomitou-Eliadou

Series:

Abdalla Nabulsi

Abstract

A substantial number of plaster objects, mainly figurines, were retrieved during excavations in the Byzantine cemetery of Khirbet es-Samrā, in northern Jordan. Most objects were plaques classified in three main types: geometric, zoomorphic and anthropomorphic. The report provides a general description of each type and an overview of parallel finds elsewhere, including those made of other materials. The report deals with problems related to the restoration of the largely fragmentary objects and their dating, which, based on archaeological evidence and radiocarbon dating, was roughly estimated to be between the fifth and seventh century AD. The objects were suggested to have reached the area through trade routes, but the iconographic evidence was not sufficient and local production remains possible. Though some were objects of daily use, the available evidence tends to associate them with local funerary customs in which mirrors were particularly prevalent. The diversity of the plaster objects seems not strictly religiously motivated but rather market oriented. Further studies in different directions are needed to answer still open questions.1

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Rebecca Miller Ammerman

Abstract

The site of Sant’Angelo Vecchio at the Greek city-state of Metapontion in southern Italy is notable for a group of kilns dating to the later fourth century BCE that are associated with the production of moulded terracotta figurines and plaques. In addition to investigating technical practices of a coroplastic workshop, this large assemblage of terracottas allows for preliminary assessment of their production with varied, but well-defined, imagery against the local consumption of terracottas with the same imagery at sanctuaries and farmhouses throughout the territory of Metapontion and, in some cases, at neighbouring Greek city-states as well as Lucanian sites.1

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Argyroula Doulgeri-Intzesiloglou and Polyxeni Arachoviti

Abstract

During the last 35 years, the excavations at the ancient city of Pherai, in Thessaly, have brought to light rich material, as well as important documentation relating to the production of terracotta figurines, as part of the intensive activity of the Pheraian ceramic workshops of the Hellenistic period. In this paper some characteristics of the local production are presented by referring to the workshops and the techniques, the contextualisation, the chronology and the use of the terracotta figurines at the city of Pherai, as well as to the possible relationships and influences from other regions.1

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Solenn de Larminat

Abstract

About 850 terracotta figurines have been found in Roman Africa since the late 19th century, in various contexts. Based on this large quantitative database, similarities and differences between figurines found in sacred and funeral contexts will be analysed. Likewise, we will see how the figurines’ spatial analysis at different sites (provinces, necropoleis, graves), the anthropological studies, the meticulous observations of the ritual treatment of the objects (breakage and reversal) and the study of associations figurines in tombs contribute to the definition of their function and allow us to move past the initial impressions conveyed by these figurative materials.

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Angele Rosenberg-Dimitracopoulou

Abstract

A series of terracottas representing youths with softly articulated musculature that stand in an s-curve emerged in Boeotia around the middle of the fifth century BCE. These soft youths predate the famous sculptor Praxiteles by approximately seventy-five years yet they share the stylistic characteristics commonly associated with his statues in marble and bronze. This paper conceptualises the terracottas as evidence of a visual trend or phenomenon in light of the type’s development in fifth century terracottas rather than in relation to Praxiteles’ personal style.1

Series:

Eleni Asderaki-Tzoumerkioti, Manos Dionyssiou, Argyroula Doulgeri-Intzesiloglou and Polyxeni Arachoviti

Abstract

Non-invasive XRF analyses analysis has been performed on more than 250 terracotta figurines from Pherai in order to determine the quality of the pigments that have survived on their surface, as well as other materials that have been used for their decoration. During the analysis the existence of tin metal foil was revealed. In most cases it is poorly preserved and obscured by a thick layer of soil and salts. Tin foil was identified in 10% of the examined pieces, and the results have been confirmed with a scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The thickness of the foil was also measured, and the organic binding medium, with which it was attached to the surface of the figurines, was determined.1