Browse results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 87 items for :

  • Book History x
  • Status (Books): Published x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All

Material Culture and Queenship in 14th-century France

The Testament of Blanche of Navarre (1331-1398)

Series:

Marguerite Keane

In Material Culture and Queenship in 14th-century France: The Testament of Blanche of Navarre (1331-1398) Marguerite Keane considers the object collection of the long-lived fourteenth-century French queen Blanche of Navarre, the wife of Philip VI (d. 1350). This queen’s ownership of works of art (books, jewelry, reliquaries, and textiles, among others) and her perceptions of these objects is well -documented because she wrote detailed testaments in 1396 and 1398 in which she described her possessions and who she wished to receive them. Keane connects the patronage of Blanche of Navarre to her interest in her status and reputation as a dowager queen, as well as bringing to life the material, adornment, and devotional interests of a medieval queen and her household.

Series:

Edited by Ronan Crowley and Dirk Van Hulle

New Quotatoes, Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age offers fourteen original essays on the genetic dossiers of Joyce’s fiction and the ties that bind the literary archive to the transatlantic print sphere of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Availing of digital media and tools, online resources, and new forms of access, the contributions delve deeper than ever before into Joyce’s programmatic reading for his oeuvre, and they posit connections and textual relations with major and minor literary figures alike never before established. The essays employ a broad range of genetic methodologies from ‘traditional’ approaches to intertextuality and allusion to computational methods that plumb Large-scale Digitisation Initiatives like Google Books to the possibilities of databasing for Joyce studies.

Contributors: Scarlett Baron, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Ronan Crowley, Sarah Davison, Tom De Keyser, Daniel Ferrer, Finn Fordham, Robbert-Jan Henkes, John Simpson, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle, Chrissie Van Mierlo, and Wim Van Mierlo.

Series:

Edited by Christoph Ehland and Cornelia Wächter

Scholars of the middlebrow have demonstrated that the preferences and choices of both women writers and women readers have suffered considerably from the dismissive attitude of earlier critics. George Eliot’s famous attack on ‘Silly Novels by Lady Novelists’ set the tone for the long tradition of gendered disputes over the literary merit of works of fiction – a controversy which eventually coalesced with a class-based hegemony of taste in the so-called Battle of the Brows.

The new research presented in this volume demonstrates that this gendered inflection of the critical debate is not only one-sided but tends to obfuscate the significance the middlebrow literary spectrum had for the wider dissemination of new concepts of gender. By exploring the scope of middlebrow media culture between 1890 and 1945, from household magazines to popular novels, the essays in this volume give evidence of the relative proximity that existed between middlebrow writers and the avant-garde in their concern for gender issues.

Contributors: Nicola Bishop, Elke D’hoker, Petra Dierkes-Thrun, Stephanie Eggermont, Christoph Ehland, Wendy Gan, Emma Grundy Haigh, Kate Macdonald, Louise McDonald, Tara MacDonald, Isobel Maddison, Ann Rea, Cornelia Wächter, Alice Wood

Religious Orders and Religious Identity Formation, ca. 1420-1620

Discourses and Strategies of Observance and Pastoral Engagement

Series:

Edited by Bert Roest and Johanneke Uphoff

This volume deals with the transformative force of Observant reforms during the long fifteenth century, and with the massive literary output by Observant religious, a token of a profound pastoral professionalization that provided religious and lay people alike with encompassing models of religious perfection, as well as with new tools to shape their religious identity. The essays in this work contend that these models and tools had an ongoing effect far into the sixteenth century (on all sides of the emerging confessional divide). At the same time, the controversies surrounding Observant reforms resulted in new sensibilities with regard to religious practices and religious nomenclature, which would fuel many of the early sixteenth-century controversies.
Contributors are Michele Camaioni, Anna Campbell, Fabrizio Conti, Anna Dlabačová, Sylvie Duval, Koen Goudriaan, Emily Michelson, Alison More, Bert Roest, Anne Thayer, Johanneke Uphoff, Alessandro Vanoli, Ludovic Viallet, and Martina Wehrli-Johns.

Imagining the Text

Ekphrasis and Envisioning Courtly Identity in Wirnt von Gravenberg's Wigalois

Series:

James H. Brown

In Imagining the Text, James Brown examines ekphrasis – the verbal representation of a visual representation – in Wirnt von Gravenberg’s thirteenth-century Arthurian romance Wigalois, one of the most popular and enduring stories in the Middle High German literary tradition. Through close reading of the text and examining illustrated Wigalois manuscripts, early print editions, and frescoes, Brown explores how ekphrasis structures the narrative, harmonizes potential conflicts in the text, and contributes to the construction of courtly identity. Imagining the Text demonstrates that the vibrant symbiosis of word and image is crucial to the poem’s sustained popularity for more than six hundred years, and contributes to the history of the book and to the study of medieval and modern modes of perception.

Series:

Anna Welch

In Liturgy, Books and Franciscan Identity in Medieval Umbria, Anna Welch explores how Franciscan friars engaged with manuscript production networks operating in Umbria in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries to produce the missals essential to their liturgical lives. A micro-history of Franciscan liturgical activity, this study reassesses methodologies pertinent to manuscript studies and reflects on both the construction of communal identity through ritual activity and historiographic trends regarding this process.
Welch focuses on manuscripts decorated by the ateliers of the Maestro di Deruta-Salerno (active c. 1280) and Maestro Venturella di Pietro (active c. 1317), in particular the Codex Sancti Paschalis, a missal now owned by the Australian Province of the Order of Friars Minor.

Edited by Angus Phillips

Logos – the international journal of the publishing community – celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2015. Since its first publication it has gained a reputation for publishing insightful and clear-headed articles about publishing, and this tradition continues to the present day, with the addition in recent years of academic articles reflecting the growth in the discipline of publishing studies.

The present collection provides the opportunity to mark this milestone in the journal’s history by reprinting over thirty articles in book form. The selection has been made with a view to representing the full span of the life of the journal, with a good spread across the years of publication from 1990 onwards. The articles selected are ones that have stood the test of time and have something interesting to say. There is broad international coverage, from Argentina to China, from Iran to Kenya, and a wide selection of topics including publishing, bookselling, libraries, censorship, and book history. The new introduction, written by the journal’s editor-in-chief, Angus Phillips, places the articles in perspective, highlighting their currency and foresight.

The volume will be essential reading for both industry professionals and students of book history and publishing studies.

Featured articles are by Maarten Aascher, Marc Aronson, Diana Athill, Betty Ballantine, Michael Bhaskar, Marie-Franҫoise Cachin and Sylvie Ducas-Spaes, Henry Chakava, John Curtis, Tomás Eloy Martínez, Joseph J. Esposito, Richard Fisher, Gordon Graham, Arash Hejazi, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén, Albert Henderson, Philip Jarvis and Sue Thomson, Eva Kneissl, Miha Kovač and Rüdiger Wischenbart, Michael Krüger, Laura J. Miller, Ian Norrie, Angus Phillips, Frances Pinter, Oliviero Ponte di Pino, Tatjana Praštalo, Tim Rix, Tom Rosenthal, Jerome Rubin, John Ryden, Tim Waterstone, and Francis Whitehead.

Discovering the Riches of the Word

Religious Reading in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Series:

Edited by Sabrina Corbellini, Margriet Hoogvliet and Bart Ramakers

The contributions to Discovering the Riches of the Word. Religious Reading in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe offer an innovative approach to the study of religious reading from a long term and geographically broad perspective, covering the period from the thirteenth to the seventeenth century and with a specific focus on the fifteenth and the sixteenth centuries.
Challenging traditional research paradigms, the contributions argue that religious reading in this “long fifteenth century” should be described in terms of continuity. They make clear that in spite of confessional divides, numerous reading practices continued to exist among medieval and early modern readers, as well as among Catholics and Protestants, and that the two groups in certain cases even shared the same religious texts.

Contributors include: Elise Boillet, Sabrina Corbellini, Suzan Folkerts, Éléonore Fournié, Wim François, Margriet Hoogvliet, Ian Johnson, Hubert Meeus, Matti Peikola, Bart Ramakers, Elisabeth Salter, Lucy Wooding, and Federico Zuliani.

Jan Moretus and the Continuation of the Plantin Press (2 Vols.)

A Bibliography of the Works published and printed by Jan Moretus I in Antwerp (1589-1610)

Series:

Dirk Imhof

Honourable Mention at 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography (2018)

The Plantin Press was one of the best known printing-publishing enterprises in the sixteenth century. In many ways, this bibliography builds and expands upon Leon Voet’s well-known publication The Plantin Press.
This bibliography of Jan Moretus I, Christopher Plantin's successor, documents the activities of the Plantin Press during the years 1589 till 1610. It contains descriptions of his own editions and other works printed by him. The extensive bibliography contains 704 descriptions of the Jan Moretus editions and lists over 500 announcements that he printed for the city of Antwerp.

Series:

Agnieszka Helman-Ważny

In Archaeology of Tibetan Books, Agnieszka Helman-Ważny explores the varieties of artistic expression, materials, and tools that have shaped Tibetan books over the millennia. Digging into the history of the bookmaking craft, the author approaches these ancient texts primarily through the lens of their artistry, while simultaneously showing them as physical objects embedded in pragmatic, economic, and social frameworks. She provides analyses of several significant Tibetan books—which usually carry Buddhist teachings—including a selection of manuscripts from Dunhuang from the 1st millennium C.E., examples of illuminated manuscripts from Western and Central Tibet dating from the 15th century, and fragments of printed Tibetan Kanjurs from as early as 1410. This detailed study of bookmaking sheds new light on the books' philosophical meanings.